Show Posts

This section allows you to view all posts made by this member. Note that you can only see posts made in areas you currently have access to.


Messages - DSJ™

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 995
1
Watto's Junk Yard / Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« on: August 21, 2015, 02:53 PM »
What a picture, clicky link & click the pic for a high-rez pic.  8)

Looking Up at Mars Rover Curiosity in 'Buckskin' Selfiet

Get your ass to Mars! 

You Can Send Your Name to Mars Aboard NASA's InSight Landert

I got my ticket!   :P


3
Watto's Junk Yard / Re: Super Hero/Comic Book Movies
« on: August 10, 2015, 12:41 PM »
I just finished watching the Fantastic Bore online. What a piece off crap!   ::)


5
Watto's Junk Yard / Re: '67 Shelby Cobra found after 45 years
« on: August 6, 2015, 11:16 AM »
I'm just hoping this Shelby on Instagram isn't the same one that you're trying to recover.

Sorry, this page isn't available.

The link you followed may be broken, or the page may have been removed.

6
Watto's Junk Yard / Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« on: August 1, 2015, 02:55 AM »
Shot of the Blue Moon I took tonite.


7
Damn! RIP Rowdy!


8
Watto's Junk Yard / Re: '67 Shelby Cobra found after 45 years
« on: July 26, 2015, 12:15 AM »
Good lord! That is a beauty!

9
1/6 Scale Hot Toys Millennium Falcon Revealed

Quote
The model measures approximately 18 feet long by 12 feet wide.

10
Watto's Junk Yard / Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« on: July 20, 2015, 11:25 PM »
46 years ago, I remember well.  8)

"That's one small step for man, one giant leap for mankind" or however he was quoted...  :P



11
Watto's Junk Yard / Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« on: July 20, 2015, 06:00 PM »
A NASA camera on the Deep Space Climate Observatory satellite has returned its first view of the entire sunlit side of Earth from one million miles away. The image was taken July 6, 2015. Credit: nasa.gov




Credit: nasa.gov

“Look again at that dot. That's here. That's home. That's us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every "superstar," every "supreme leader," every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there-on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam.

The Earth is a very small stage in a vast cosmic arena. Think of the endless cruelties visited by the inhabitants of one corner of this pixel on the scarcely distinguishable inhabitants of some other corner, how frequent their misunderstandings, how eager they are to kill one another, how fervent their hatreds. Think of the rivers of blood spilled by all those generals and emperors so that, in glory and triumph, they could become the momentary masters of a fraction of a dot.

Our posturings, our imagined self-importance, the delusion that we have some privileged position in the Universe, are challenged by this point of pale light. Our planet is a lonely speck in the great enveloping cosmic dark. In our obscurity, in all this vastness, there is no hint that help will come from elsewhere to save us from ourselves.

The Earth is the only world known so far to harbor life. There is nowhere else, at least in the near future, to which our species could migrate. Visit, yes. Settle, not yet. Like it or not, for the moment the Earth is where we make our stand.

It has been said that astronomy is a humbling and character-building experience. There is perhaps no better demonstration of the folly of human conceits than this distant image of our tiny world. To me, it underscores our responsibility to deal more kindly with one another, and to preserve and cherish the pale blue dot, the only home we've ever known.”

― Carl Sagan, Pale Blue Dot   :)

12
Watto's Junk Yard / Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« on: July 16, 2015, 06:21 PM »
This new image of an area on Pluto's largest moon Charon has a captivating feature—a depression with a peak in the middle, shown here in the upper left corner of the inset.

The image shows an area approximately 240 miles (390 kilometers) from top to bottom, including few visible craters. “The most intriguing feature is a large mountain sitting in a moat,” said Jeff Moore with NASA’s Ames Research Center, Moffett Field, California, who leads New Horizons’ Geology, Geophysics and Imaging team. “This is a feature that has geologists stunned and stumped.”

This image gives a preview of what the surface of this large moon will look like in future close-ups from NASA's New Horizons spacecraft. This image is heavily compressed; sharper versions are anticipated when the full-fidelity data from New Horizons' Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) are returned to Earth.

The rectangle superimposed on the global view of Charon shows the approximate location of this close-up view.

The image was taken at approximately 6:30 a.m. EDT (10:30 UTC) on July 14, 2015, about 1.5 hours before closest approach to Pluto, from a range of 49,000 miles (79,000 kilometers).


Credit: NASA-JHUAPL-SwR

13
Watto's Junk Yard / Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« on: July 15, 2015, 05:35 PM »
What New Horizons reveals about Pluto


New close-up images of a region near Pluto’s equator reveal a giant surprise -- a range of youthful mountains rising as high as 11,000 feet (3,500 meters) above the surface of the icy body. Credits: NASA/JHU APL/SwRI

Charon’s Surprising, Youthful and Varied Terrain


Credit: NASA-JHUAPL-SwRI

Pages: [1] 2 3 4 5 6 ... 995