Author Topic: The Official Space Exploration Thread  (Read 134444 times)

Offline DSJ™

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #690 on: November 28, 2008, 09:57 PM »
Awesome news on the meteor from last week.

Meteorite pieces found in Saskatchewan

Scientists find space rock that streaked through skies of Western Canada



The remains of a meteor that exploded in the sky near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border on Nov. 20 have been located by University of Calgary researchers south of the city of Lloydminster in an area called Buzzard Coulee.

Offline Rob

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #691 on: November 28, 2008, 10:37 PM »
Excellent!

A few years ago I ended up with a chunk of the Campo Del Cielo meteorite.  It has a little oxidation going on that I need to deal with one of these days - I love the idea of having a space rock sitting on my desk.

« Last Edit: November 28, 2008, 10:38 PM by Rob »

Offline Matt_Fury

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #692 on: November 29, 2008, 12:15 AM »
Cool info on the meteor Dale.  That whole story reminded me of the meteorite in 1990 that could be seen up the entire east coast of the US.  It crashed into a car in Peekskill, NY not too far from where my grandparents lived.

I always wondered if insurance covered that.  :D


Neat paper weight there Rob.  How much did that set you back?

Have any of you heard about Bigelow Aerospace?  They are a private company that actually has two technology demonstrator space stations in orbit!  I read about them in Air & Space Smithsonian and I think it's incredibly cool.

As much as I'm a fan of NASA, I also like to see commercial companies venture into space.
Peacekeeper, when it absolutely, positively has to be nuked in 30 minutes or less.  Or the next nuke's free!

Offline Rob

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #693 on: November 29, 2008, 01:52 AM »
Thanks. :)

It was a Christmas gift - but I'd guess somewhere in the neighborhood of $100 to $150 based on my own eBay searches.

Offline BillCable

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #694 on: November 29, 2008, 08:58 AM »
The remains of a meteor that exploded in the sky near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border on Nov. 20 have been located by University of Calgary researchers south of the city of Lloydminster in an area called Buzzard Coulee.

Buzzard Coulee - gotta be one of the coolest place names I've seen.  Lloydminster isn't too bad either.
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Offline DSJ™

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #695 on: November 29, 2008, 10:28 AM »
Buzzard Coulee sure has a ring to it, I'm sure that will be the meteors name.

More pics on the net on the meteor.



Planetary scientist Alan Hildebrand and graduate student Ellen Milley said they found meteorite fragments in a rural area near the border town of Lloydminster, Alta., late Thursday. (Photo courtesy of Grady Semmens, University of Calgary)



A meteorite fragment is shown next to a hammer for scale. (Photo courtesy of Grady Semmens, University of Calgary)



Graduate student Ellen Milley lays next to a meteorite fragment in a rural area near the border town of Lloydminster, Alta. (Photo courtesy of Grady Semmens, University of Calgary)



Planetary scientist Alan Hildebrand and hold a chunk of meteorite fragment in a rural area near the border town of Lloydminster, Alta. (Photo courtesy of Grady Semmens, University of Calgary)

There was another meteor find back in the 60's, known as the Bruderheim meteorite, quite the find as this one had more than 700 fragments that were recovered. 303 kg of stones, ranging in size from 31 kg to 5 mg.

Rob, any idea on the size/weight of that Campo Del Cielo meteorite? I remember you were looking for a meteorite a few years back. I meteor hype has me interested in getting a piece to display.

Offline DSJ™

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #696 on: November 30, 2008, 09:12 AM »
The STS-126 crew members, Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Eric Boe and mission specialists Don Pettit, Steve Bowen, Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, Shane Kimbrough and Greg Chamitoff, were awakened at 4:55 a.m. EST for what is scheduled to be their flight’s landing day. This morning's wake up music was "Gonna Fly Now," played for Ferguson.

The two landing opportunities at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., are for 1:19 p.m. and 2:54 p.m. Forecasts say rain, perhaps thunderstorms and crosswinds could prevent a landing there.

Two additional landing opportunities are available today at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., at 4:25 p.m. and 6 p.m.

Offline DSJ™

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #697 on: November 30, 2008, 11:58 AM »
NASA waves off first chance for shuttle landing

The weather forecast is "no go" for today's second landing opportunity at Kennedy Space Center. A front is moving through Florida, causing storms to move through the region. Flight controllers are also looking at potential landing opportunities for Monday. The STS-126 crew still has two landing opportunities today at Edwards Air Force Base in California at 4:25 p.m. and 6 p.m. if the weather conditions are not favorable for a Monday landing in Florida.

Entry Flight Director Bryan Lunney gave a "go" for payload bay door closure. This does not necessarily mean that Endeavour will land today. Weather conditions for landing at Kennedy Space Center tomorrow are still being evaluated. A front is moving through Florida, causing storms to move through the region. The STS-126 crew still has two landing opportunities today at Edwards Air Force Base in California at 4:25 p.m. and 6 p.m. if the weather conditions are not favorable for a Monday landing in Florida.

Offline DSJ™

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #698 on: November 30, 2008, 12:51 PM »
NASA: Shuttle to try landing at air base in California

Flight controllers have elected to press ahead with space shuttle Endeavour's landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California at 4:25 p.m. EST today. The deorbit burn is scheduled for 3:19 p.m. The weather forecast in Florida for today and tomorrow is unfavorable for a shuttle landing at Kennedy Space Center.

Offline DSJ™

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #699 on: November 30, 2008, 09:38 PM »
Shuttle Endeavour lands at California air base



Space shuttle Endeavour touches down at Edwards Air Force Base on Nov. 30, 2008, concluding the STS-126 mission. This image captures Endeavour's drag chute as it deployed as the shuttle touched down the base's Runway 4. Credit: NASA/Tony Landis.

Offline Darth_Anton

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #700 on: December 1, 2008, 09:40 AM »
My kids freaked out a little with the sonic boom. When they learned it was the space shuttle, they loved it.
« Last Edit: December 1, 2008, 09:40 AM by Darth_Anton »
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Offline DSJ™

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #701 on: December 10, 2008, 03:40 AM »
Holy ****, this vehicle is sweet!  8)

Secretive Space Vehicle Tested at Private Texas Site

Video - Blue Origin's Goddard Vehicle Test Launch



Blue Origin's Goddard test vehicle stands poised for launch on its West Texas launch pad on Nov. 13, 2006. Credit: Blue Origin.



Origin's Goddard demonstration vehicle in mid-flight above its West Texas launch pad during a test launch on Nov. 13, 2006. Credit: Blue Origin.

Offline DSJ™

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #702 on: December 13, 2008, 11:31 AM »
Moon muscles in on meteor shower
Usually dazzling Geminid display dimmed by lunar light this year


Too bad the moon is full, this would be a good meteor show. Even if there was no full moon & with the temps here being around -30°C, I'm not freezing my nuts off!

Offline Matt_Fury

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #703 on: December 13, 2008, 04:46 PM »
-30 isn't THAT bad.....I preferred that temperature to between 0-10 Farenheit when I was living up in Alaska!   :D
Peacekeeper, when it absolutely, positively has to be nuked in 30 minutes or less.  Or the next nuke's free!

Offline DSJ™

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Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
« Reply #704 on: December 13, 2008, 04:55 PM »
Yeah, Alaska is warmer than us right now.  ::)

Come up here & I'll see how you like -30°C.  ;)

With that breeze & the temp, it sure as hell ain't gonna happen.  :P