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Community => Watto's Junk Yard => Topic started by: DSJ™ on February 1, 2003, 10:32 AM

Title: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 1, 2003, 10:32 AM
It is with deep regret that I inform you on this.

http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/02/01/shuttle.columbia/index.html

My heart & payers go out with the famliy's & NASA.  :(  :'(

Title: Re: Space Shuttle Columbia
Post by: JediMAC on February 1, 2003, 02:30 PM
Truly heartbreaking to witness another terrible tragedy like this.  Just a horrible story to wake up in the morning to find waiting for you on your TV.  My deepest sympathies go out to all of the friends and families of the seven heroic astronauts who lost their lives.

I hope that NASA is able to pinpoint the cause, and rebound with their space program soon...
Title: Re:Space Shuttle Columbia.
Post by: dustrho on February 1, 2003, 02:46 PM
My heart goes out to all those affected today by this tragedy.  I too woke up to this and have been watching the news all day long.

 :'(
Title: Re:Space Shuttle Columbia.
Post by: DSJ™ on February 1, 2003, 03:18 PM
(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/Columbia%207.jpg)

The Space Program will go on.  :)

Remember Jan 28, 1986 & Feb 1, 2003.
Title: Re:Space Shuttle Columbia.
Post by: Angry Ewok on February 2, 2003, 12:08 AM
There's nothing I can say that hasn't already been said, so I won't try. RIP, hopefully NASA can learn from the mistake so it won't happen again.  
Title: Re:Space Shuttle Columbia.
Post by: Scott on February 3, 2003, 11:58 AM
My thoughts and prayers are with the Columbia astronauts, families and people who work for NASA.   I never thought we would see two Space Shuttles gone.  I was home sick the day the Challanger blew up (probably the sickest I have ever been to boot) and so I had tons of feverish nightmares that week.  I along with a lot of other kids in the 80's dreamed of being an astronaut, SW was a big part of that dream.  

In one of Carl Sagan's books he predicted doom for the shuttle program if another one was destroyed.  Space exploration funding is seen as unneccesary (witness the ISS being 20+ years behind schedule due to budget cuts in its program).  Risking astronaut lives is deemed to risky and many of the missions could be performed by unmanned craft (see many of the recent Mars successes and failures) for far cheaper costs.  Plus public reaction to this disaster may mean even less risk wanted to be taken in tax money.

BTW AE, have you ever been to the rocket museum in Huntsville?  I alwys have wanted to go (I fly in to Huntsville when I go to Alabama) but never have gotten the chance
Title: Re:Space Shuttle Columbia.
Post by: Angry Ewok on February 3, 2003, 08:18 PM
BTW AE, have you ever been to the rocket museum in Huntsville?  I alwys have wanted to go (I fly in to Huntsville when I go to Alabama) but never have gotten the chance
I've been there a number of times, and each time there's something different about it. Coolest thing there is the components of a shuttle... that is, the backyard has fuel tanks and all that stuff laid out and you can walk around them and such. On the inside there's a lot of cool stuff, including a few models of Star Wars vehicles!

Definately the coolest thing in Alabama besides... um... yea it's the coolest thing in Alabama.
Title: And Then There Was Light
Post by: DSJ™ on March 25, 2003, 10:30 AM
Here's a really cool picture of the Sun.

(http://i.cnn.net/cnn/TECH/space/specials/scenes/2003/03/25/gallery.twin.prom.jpg)

Our sun spurts out two large plumes of so-called prominences in an image captured by the SOHO satellite. Prominences are huge clouds of relatively cool, dense plasma swirling around the sun's corona. These prominences extend about 20 Earths out from the sun. SOHO, the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory, is a satellite launched in 1995 to give scientists an uninterrupted view of the sun. It's operated by the European Space Agency and NASA.
(03/25/03)
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: Angry Ewok on March 25, 2003, 10:34 AM
Awesome. I've got a pretty nice telescope, and I was thinking about getting a sun-filter so I can look at it... but at moment just havent had the interest to.
I've got a cool picture of the moon I took from my telescope, I'll post it later today if anyone's interested in seeing the moon (not a big deal, but still sorta cool).
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: Reconsgt on March 25, 2003, 10:35 AM
Great pic,  I have always been fascinated by space exploration, I watch what I can when its on TV, discovery channel is great for that.
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: Angry Ewok on March 25, 2003, 10:40 AM
Have you guys seen one of the space shows at an IMAX? Man, that was first thing I saw at an IMAX, and it was so awesome. I just couldnt help but wish IMAX had a "Battle Over Endor" show, where you basically soar around space in the midst of the huge battle... Man, that'd be awesome, okay, im done.  :-[
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: DSJ™ on March 25, 2003, 11:06 AM
Where's the Marshmallows.  ;D

(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/Sun.gif)

Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: dustrho on March 25, 2003, 03:48 PM
These are some AWESOME pictures here!  Love those pictures of the sun, and make sure there are postings of the moon.  I'd love to see them!
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: BobaShek on March 25, 2003, 04:35 PM
Woah, those are awesome pics!:D

I can't wait to go to the IMAX theatre in Boston for my school field trip this April. I've heard nothing but good things. :)
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: DSJ™ on March 26, 2003, 11:14 AM
Todays image's:

Lunar Farside from Apollo 11.

(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/lunarfarside_apollo11.jpg)

The Old Moon in the New Moon's Arms

(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/NewOld.jpg)
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: Reconsgt on March 26, 2003, 11:58 AM
The new moon old moon shot is very cool.
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: MisterPL on March 26, 2003, 12:04 PM
(http://i.cnn.net/cnn/TECH/space/specials/scenes/2003/03/25/gallery.twin.prom.jpg)

I have an infected ingrown hair that feels the way that looks. Otherwise, cool pics. I need to get a telescope for my son so we can study the moon's craters. I always enjoyed doing that when I was young. (That and peeping on Lana Lang!)
Title: Re: Then There Was Light. Pictures From Soace
Post by: DSJ™ on March 27, 2003, 09:42 AM
Light Echoes from V838 Mon, mysterious star in the Milky Way.

(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/Light%20Echoes%20from%20V838%20Mon.jpg)
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: Scott on April 4, 2003, 02:47 PM
Here is my favorite...

(http://www.extremescience.com/ES%20wallpaper/eye_nebula_800x600.jpg)
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: dustrho on April 4, 2003, 05:20 PM
Scott, that picture looks like an eyeball!  Very cool!
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: DSJ™ on April 5, 2003, 06:22 AM
Ahhhhh! The Hourglass Nebula if I am correct. Very nice indeed.

This is one of my favorite Nebula's. The HorseHead Nebula.

(http://www.robgendlerastropics.com/HHLRGB.jpg)

If anyone else has pictures of there favorite space shot's let's see them. The Universe is full of amazing wonders.
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: Scott on April 7, 2003, 01:01 PM
I often have this image as my Wallpaper...much bigger of course  :-*

(http://www.kidscosmos.org/kid-stuff/graphics/saturn-moons-1.jpg)
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: Depmode on April 7, 2003, 01:32 PM
don't throw stones at me, but one of the reasons i like Wrath Of Khan so much is because the space shots look so friggin cool, as do these pictures.
Title: Moon landing notebook fetches $222,000
Post by: DSJ™ on April 13, 2003, 07:34 PM
Holy mother of all auctions.  :o

Moon landing Notebook  (http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/04/13/life.auction.apollo.reut/index.html)
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: Scott on May 23, 2003, 12:21 PM
Saw this over at Yahoo...pretty cool pic of Earth from a Mars satellite

(http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20030522/capt.1053637097.earth_from_mars_la105.jpg)
Title: Re: And Then There Was Light
Post by: DSJ™ on May 23, 2003, 12:39 PM
Thats a very cool pic of Mother Earth & her Satellite.
Here is a very interesting picture of V838 Monocerotis. A burst of light from the bizarre star is spreading into space and reflecting off of surrounding shells of dust to reveal a spectacular, multicolored bull's eye.   8)

(http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/2003/10/images/a/formats/web.jpg)

(http://www.physlink.com/News/Images/BirthAnim.gif)
Title: Mars Attacks!
Post by: Virex on August 26, 2003, 07:35 PM
Just a heads-up for anyone who's casually interested in astronomy at all:

Quote
    Earth and Mars will come as close as they desire in Wednesday’s wee hours during a historical event that has captivated the attention of skywatchers around the globe. The two planets will be separated by 34,646,418 million miles at 5:51 a.m. ET. Not since the Neanderthals shared this planet with early humans have the two worlds been so close. . . .

WHERE TO LOOK  
 
        Mars rises in the southeast around sunset, your local time, shimmering like an orange star so bright it could momentarily be mistaken for an airliner on final approach. It outshines all other stars in the sky. Around 1 a.m. Mars is due south and high in the sky. It sets in the southwest at about sunrise.
       No equipment is necessary to observe Mars closer than has any human in the past 59,619 years. But the best views are afforded through telescopes, which can reveal surface markings, the south polar ice cap and clouds.

http://www.msnbc.com/news/957424.asp

I've enjoyed watching the different meteor showers and Space Shuttle pass-overs over the years, so I'll try to check it out tonight.  

Anyone else?
Title: Re: Mars Attacks!
Post by: Scott on August 26, 2003, 10:18 PM
Saw it last night, it is super bright. Someday when me boy is older I hope to get a nice telescope.  I used to love looking through my old one and it was a piece of crap  :-*

Title: Re: Mars Attacks!
Post by: Diddly on August 26, 2003, 10:54 PM
Not sure if I'll be able to see it or not, thanks to the clouds. >:( If I can't, I'll just see footage on the news tomorrow. :)
Title: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Scott on September 18, 2003, 11:22 AM
How wacky and futuristic does this sound?

Space Elevator (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=96&e=14&u=/space/spaceelevatorhighhopesloftygoals)

How long would a trip to the moon on an elevator take?

Holy crap!
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: dustrho on September 18, 2003, 11:30 AM
That would be pretty cool to take an elevator to the moon, but you know how long it would take to get there?
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: BigDumbWookiee on September 18, 2003, 12:51 PM
I read about this in a Popular Mechanics about 8 months ago, and nobody I told believed me ;)
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Scott on September 18, 2003, 12:56 PM
I read about this in a Popular Mechanics about 8 months ago, and nobody I told believed me ;)

I don't believe you now :-*

If I understand this right...cables from the destinations will be strung to platforms in on earth and these machines will pull themselves back and forth to the spots

(http://www.space.com/images/v_climber_platform_02.jpg)
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Jim on September 18, 2003, 12:59 PM
Tell you what.  You guys can test it.  My butt will catch it on CNN and several months later on Americas Craziest Videos :)
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: BigDumbWookiee on September 18, 2003, 02:11 PM
Nevermind the fact that if it does ever get built, it will probably become the world's single largest target for terrorism
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Scott on September 18, 2003, 02:13 PM
Sort of like the machine in Contact (one of my all time favorite books and movies) :-*
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: dustrho on September 18, 2003, 02:21 PM
Sort of like the machine in Contact (one of my all time favorite books and movies) :-*

That is an AWESOME movie!!!  I watch it almost once a month.
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Angry Ewok on September 18, 2003, 02:26 PM
Ok so... Whose paying for this? Uh-huh... And who could afford it? Right.  ::)
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Scott on September 18, 2003, 02:31 PM
It says  NASA is seriously considering these things...around $6 Billion to build, they can reduce payload costs tremendously and probably do everything unmanned
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Darby on September 18, 2003, 02:35 PM
That's the coolest thing I've read in a long time.  And the reality of it is closer than most people think.  
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: JoshEEE on September 18, 2003, 02:55 PM
Reminds me of the South Park where they tried to build a ladder to heaven.

What a silly idea.
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Angry Ewok on September 18, 2003, 03:42 PM
It says  NASA is seriously considering these things...around $6 Billion to build, they can reduce payload costs tremendously and probably do everything unmanned
I forgot to ask with my first reply... but... Why do we need an elevator to the moon?
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Darby on September 18, 2003, 11:33 PM
Don't know we need one, but it has practical applications should we ever decide to maintain a permanent presence on the moon.  I think seeing is believing in this case, though.   ;D
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Scott on September 18, 2003, 11:54 PM
Basically Brad it is two things...sending rockets into space is tremendously expensive and risky...2 shuttles gone in a little over 100 missions at 100's of Millions of dollars a pop.  All of that money is factored into a cost per pound of actual delivered payload into space.  Right now that between $10,000 to $40,000...this elevator would reduce the cost to $100 a pound supposedly.

Making it easier to launch satellites and eventually everyday Joe Blow into Space if he wants to go.  Look at dude who made $10 Million to go to the Space Station on a Russian Rocket, if the dollar savings was realized as above someone could get there for $100,000, very doable for a lot more people.  Interesting idea...cool to see where this goes
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: DSJ™ on September 19, 2003, 08:57 AM
Here's a couple of links on the Space Elevator:

The Space Elevator Comes Closer to Reality (http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/technology/space_elevator_020327-1.html)

Space Elevator: Next Stop, Earth Orbit (http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/technology/space_elevator_001226.html)

Title: China Puts Man In Space!
Post by: DSJ™ on October 14, 2003, 10:13 PM
WOW!   8)

China's space mission lifts off (http://edition.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/10/14/china.launch/index.html)

China finally did it. They have a man in space.  8)
Being a space buff my self this is just awesome. This Taikonaut is to orbit the earth 14 times in the next 24 hrs & return to earth hopefully safely.

Hope the mission goes well for them. As we know, space is a dangerous place to explore.

I just saw some off the launch on the news & that was something to see.  8)
 

Title: Re: China Puts Man In Space!
Post by: Angry Ewok on October 15, 2003, 09:36 AM
Most people I've talked to about this don't think he'll get back to earth... I don't really have an opinion just yet.

I always new you were a space buff.  :-*
Title: Re: China Puts Man In Space!
Post by: Membraneman on October 15, 2003, 07:19 PM


I always new you were a space buff.  :-*

Well I always knew Dale was Spaced, out that is... ;D
Title: pictures from hubble
Post by: jokabofe on November 10, 2003, 12:51 AM
here's a really cool flash presentation with some pictures from the hubble:

http://wires.news.com.au/special/mm/030811-hubble.htm

really, really cool photos. if you get a chance, check them out
Title: Re: pictures from hubble
Post by: Angry Ewok on November 10, 2003, 10:49 AM
Very cool. The music was sorta creepy...  :-\


So... Do you guys think life is out there?
Title: Re: pictures from hubble
Post by: Scott on November 10, 2003, 10:56 AM
The statistics pretty much say there has to be...

And I think there is and as I've said before I hope I am alive to se the day that "Contact" is made

I love the Hubble, some great, great stuff!

Thanks for the link Dave!
Title: Re: pictures from hubble
Post by: Dressel Rebel on November 11, 2003, 02:47 AM


And I think there is and as I've said before I hope I am alive to se the day that "Contact" is made


lol

As long as it's not the kind of contact the aliens made in Independence Day!

 :-X
Title: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Scott on January 8, 2004, 09:42 PM
Bush to Announce Missions to Mars, Moon (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20040109/ap_on_go_pr_wh/bush_space)

Quote
WASHINGTON - President Bush (news - web sites) will announce plans next week to send Americans to Mars and establish a permanent human presence on the moon, senior administration officials said Thursday night.

Bush won't propose sending Americans to Mars anytime soon; rather, he envisions preparing for the mission more than a decade from now, one official said.


In addition to a returning trip to the moon for the first time since December 1972, the president also wants to build a permanent space station there.


Three senior officials said Bush wants to aggressively reinvigorate the space program, which has been demoralized by a series of setbacks, including the space shuttle disaster last February that killed seven astronauts.


The officials, speaking on condition of anonymity, said Bush's announcement would come in the middle of next week.


Bush has been expected to propose a bold new space mission in an effort to rally Americans around a unifying theme as he campaigns for re-election.


Many insiders had speculated he might set forth goals at the 100th anniversary of the Wright brothers' famed flight last month in North Carolina. Instead, he said only that America would continue to lead the world in aviation.


Earlier, White House spokesman Scott McClellan told reporters traveling with Bush in Florida that the president would make an announcement about space next week, but he declined to give details.


House Science Committee spokeswoman Heidi Tringe said lawmakers on the panel "haven't been briefed on the specifics" but expected an announcement.


Rep. Ralph Hall, R-Texas, a member of the House Science Committee, said he welcomed the move because he has tried to get the president more interested in space exploration.


"I had the feeling the last 2 1/2 years people would rather make a trip to the grocery store than a trip to the moon because of the economy," Hall said. "As things are turning around, we need to stay in touch with space" and the science spinoffs it provides.


This week, NASA (news - web sites) landed a six-wheeled robot on Mars to study the planet. However, the Spirit rover is stuck because the air bags that cushioned its landing are obstructing its movement.


Asked Wednesday whether the success of the Mars rovers could lead to a human mission to Mars, NASA Administrator Sean O'Keefe said, "The rovers are a precursor mission — kind of an advance team — to figuring out what the conditions are on the planet, and once we figure out how to deal with the human effects, we can then send humans to explore in real time."


While answering questions on the White House Web site, O'Keefe said interplanetary exploration depends on "what we learn and whether we can develop the power and ... propulsion capabilities necessary to get there faster and stay longer and potentially support humans in doing so."


No one, least of all members of Congress, knows how NASA would pay for lunar camps or Mars expeditions. The last time a president pushed such ambitious ideas — the first President Bush on the 20th anniversary of the first manned moon landing — the estimated price tag was $400 billion to $500 billion.


The moon is just three days away while Mars is at least six months away, and the lunar surface therefore could be a safe place to shake out Martian equipment. Observatories also could be built on the moon, and mining camps could be set up to gather helium-3 for conversion into fuel for use back on Earth.


House Majority Leader Tom DeLay, R-Texas, among others, has called for an expansion of the U.S. space program, including a return to the moon. The United States put 12 men on the moon between July 1969 and December 1972.

   


An interagency task force led by Vice President ****  Cheney (news - web sites) has been considering options for a space mission since summer.

Former Ohio Sen. John Glenn, the first American to orbit the Earth, has said that before deciding to race off to the moon or Mars, the nation needs to complete the international space station and provide the taxi service to accommodate a full crew of six or seven. The station currently houses two.

At the same time, Glenn has said, NASA could be laying out a long-term plan, setting a loose timetable and investing in the engineering challenges of sending people to Mars. The only sensible reason for going to the moon first, he says, would be to test the technology for a Mars trip.
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Famine on January 8, 2004, 09:45 PM
Wow.

See, Bush da man.

Kevin
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Scott on January 8, 2004, 09:53 PM
Wowza...who are the idiots who are going to pay for this???

This is why an international Space Agency makes sense to me, with promised contributions from all of the countries who want to participate, then everyone can share in on the glory, they could plant 12 flags on Mars and not just the US one

It would be great though if they commit to this...
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Scott on January 8, 2004, 11:02 PM
I'd also like to point out Carl Sagan was a huge proponent of unmanned flights...

#1 Cheaper
#2 Cheaper
#3 Cheaper
#4 No Risk of Human Life
#5 Cheaper
#6 Cheaper
#7 The same types of things gleemed from manned missions can be done by unmanned
#8 Cheaper
#9 Cheaper
#10 There is no need to do so really until we are ready to make Mars hospitible (Terraformed) which means hundreds of years from now perhaps

This though was during a time when Congress was considering nuking NASA altogether. There is a lot of sense to be made...that guy must have been a genius or something
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Ben on January 9, 2004, 12:41 AM
This kind of thing would have to be done by many countries. The US alone can't handle it, because we're blowing our money by blowing up sandy rocks. China, Japan, and some other countries that I can't think of now could help. But, I have to applaud Bush for wanting to go back to the Moon. Mars is a little further off, I'm sure, but I'd love to see it happen.
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: sp00ky on January 9, 2004, 09:47 AM
Bush to Announce Missions to Mars, Moon (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&u=/ap/20040109/ap_on_go_pr_wh/bush_space)

Quote
An interagency task force led by Vice President ****  Cheney (news - web sites) has been considering options for a space mission since summer.

I like how the swear filter removed the first name of your Vice-President. :D
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: DSJ™ on January 9, 2004, 10:03 AM
Wowza...who are the idiots who are going to pay for this???

No bucks, no Buck Rogers (http://funwavs.com/wavfile.php?quote=2873&sound=8)  Plan & simple, Taxpayers!

Government Space Budgets To Continue Growth (http://www.spacedaily.com/news/satellite-biz-03zzzl.html)    :o
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Scott on January 9, 2004, 10:04 AM
I thought we brought back Dick from Swear Purgatory...testing (I copied and pasted this from RS so that might be why it's blanked out)
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Force Guy on January 9, 2004, 11:11 AM
Way to go, Dubya.   ::)  

We're spending billions in Iraq, billions in Afghanistan, billions in tax cuts that cater to the wealthy, so why not spend billions in space?  Screw the fact that schools around this country could use extra funds, and screw the fact that the amount of money that is being spent could put a great number of Americans through college.  Let's go to Mars...
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Darth Broem on January 9, 2004, 11:32 AM
Yep, personally I would love to see us return to the moon and eventually go to Mars.  Great idea.  I think there would be plenty of nifty inventions from it.  I actually kind of like Bush more than others seem to, but I just can't see how it would be paid for at this time.  To be honest I'd rather see the money go to things that Force Guy mentioned.  

It's a bitchin idea don't get me wrong.  I think NASA and other space agencies are actually better suited when it comes to going for stuff like manmed missions to the moon.  They seem to get into that more than a space station or rovers IMO.  Not that they are not already, but you would probably see more people want to get into science and such to rally behind a project like that instead of rovers and robots.  There is a lot of benefit that could come from this.  But I don't think now is the time.  Someone could change my mind though :)
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: DSJ™ on January 14, 2004, 09:31 AM
Well todays the big day.

Bush to seek billions for moon, Mars treks (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/01/14/bush.space/index.html)

I wonder what this "Crew Exploration Vehicle" will look like. Maybe something like this?

(http://ares.jsc.nasa.gov/HumanExplore/Exploration/EXLibrary/images/Pics/LUNOX/05Pilot.gif)

LUNOX Scenario Concept Images (http://ares.jsc.nasa.gov/HumanExplore/Exploration/EXLibrary/images/LUNOX.htm)

Any ideas on what the Moonbase will look like?
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Angry Ewok on January 14, 2004, 04:46 PM
You know, it would be cool to see another moonwalk televised and all - since the government's special effects department has improved so much since the 70's.
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: DSJ™ on January 14, 2004, 09:20 PM
You know, it would be cool to see another moonwalk televised and all - since the government's special effects department has improved so much since the 70's.

Ah, the Capricorn One syndrome.  ;)

So its laid out.

BUSH SPACE INITIATIVE
•Spend $12 billion on new space exploration plan over next five years. $1bn will be new money, the rest reallocated from existing NASA programs.
•Retire shuttle program by 2010
•Develop new manned exploration vehicle
•Launch manned mission to moon between 2015 and 2020
•Build permanent lunar base as "stepping stone" for more ambitious missions
•Complete commitments to  International Space Station by 2010
 
Bush unveils vision for moon and beyond (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/01/14/bush.space/index.html)
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: OrionSlaveLotion on January 15, 2004, 01:04 AM
Quote
Any ideas on what the Moonbase will look like?

(http://www.msnusers.com/_Secure/0QAASF3ATSHl3rFaXKg9zVbEOwl!DlQbkSdLfvK!8YSGgvLTbBHEbJVGiK4qtXXBZjC9C0Y3eDwRCXsLqzVUkwNxNkGhRP98uACAAABBwEhc/moon.jpg?dc=4675455620093896501)
Title: Re: Hubble Space Telescope
Post by: DSJ™ on January 17, 2004, 02:05 PM
The Hubble Space Telescope is now a casualty of NASA.  :'(

Hubble casualty of Bush space plan (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/01/16/hubble.telescope.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Ben on January 17, 2004, 03:01 PM
Force Guy brings up a good point about education. But, what does our children's educations matter to a man who just wants to get into history books?
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Darby on January 17, 2004, 04:34 PM
The Hubble shows you much they don't care about education.  The telescope has been and will be an invaluable tool to astronomers and scientists, but now it's too risky?  Not nearly as risky as going to Mars.
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Scott on January 22, 2004, 02:41 PM
Oops

NASA team loses contact with Mars rover (http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/01/22/spirit.contact/index.html)

This is EXACTLY why I don't think we should be spending 100's of Billions of Dollars on a Mars Mission quite yet...
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: DSJ™ on January 22, 2004, 03:04 PM
Moon, maybe. Mars no. Hubble Space Telescope, keep it, it has proven its worth many times over & will amaze us more in the future.

Hope they do get some contact with Spirit. Opportunity is to land this weekend.
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Darth Broem on January 23, 2004, 11:03 AM
All is not lost yet.  They could still get contact from Spirit.  Well, ok, not likely.  We'll see if they have better success with Opportunity or not.  

With Bush putting an emphasis on moon missions I'd assume NASA may get some better resources for their missions now instead of little robots.  The robots don't seem to be all that reliable afterall.  If one thing goes wrong that's it apparently.  
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: DSJ™ on January 23, 2004, 11:08 AM
All is not lost yet.  They could still get contact from Spirit.  

Apparently they did!   :)

NASA gets 20-minute signal from Mars rover (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/01/23/spirit.contact/index.html)

The little robot that could!  ;)
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Scott on January 23, 2004, 11:16 AM
Yeah that is good news!  Hopefully all is well, perhaps there is a huge duststorm on Mars right now ???
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: DSJ™ on January 25, 2004, 03:15 AM
Opportunity, the second of NASA's twin rovers, has made the descent to the surface of Mars, touching down successfully at about 0505 GMT Sunday.

Opportunity lands on Mars (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/01/25/mars.rovers/index.html)

Spirit 'upgraded from critical to serious', The rover is probably "three weeks away from driving.  :)
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Darby on January 25, 2004, 04:28 AM
Yay.   ;D

I wish them both success.
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: DSJ™ on January 25, 2004, 04:36 AM
Man, were those new pictures awesome. I was watching it live on NASA TV Landing Page (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

There down for the night but let me tell you,  :o   8)  
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: DSJ™ on January 25, 2004, 04:59 AM
First pictures posted on the site. 8)

The first images from Meridiani Planum (http://marsrovers.nasa.gov/home/)
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: Scott on January 26, 2004, 09:58 AM
I watched this on Saturday night, it was pretty cool, looks like a neat place they landed, some of the shots look like there are footprints in front of the rover :-X
Title: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: LandotheScoundrel on March 2, 2004, 04:37 PM
Quote
NASA scientists say the Mars rovers have found what they were looking for -- hard evidence that the red planet was once "soaking wet."

Despite sounding like the intro to a sci-fi porno movie, this is exciting news!

Here's the article. (http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/03/02/mars.findings/index.html)

Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: LandotheScoundrel on March 2, 2004, 04:53 PM
I wonder if there was ever life on Mars...I think a discovery like that would really shake up our concept of life. To know that we aren't the only planet that life developed, not even the only planet in our solar system would be a completely humbling experience...and possibly one that unites people globally.

I guess beings on Mars wouldn't have as much muscle mass as we do, considering the lower gravity of about .38g. Also, it could be possible there was a technologically advanced civilization, and they could have caused Mars to be the barren globe it is today. They may have been a proud people, with their little wirey bodies and advanced technological probes (http://www.jedidefender.com/spearson/GNT.jpg).
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: Scott on March 2, 2004, 05:02 PM
Really cool stuff...there were meteorites found in Antartica of supposed Mars origin that contained fossilized microbes.  As we know it...organic material + water + oxygen + sun = life.  It seems all of those pieces were there at one time...I think its a good possibility

What if...we go to Mars and we find ancient ruins, 100's of millions years old and traces of some long forgotten wars... :P
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: LandotheScoundrel on March 2, 2004, 05:07 PM
As long as we don't see this... (http://www.planetavp.com/al/Alien/PhotoGallery/derelictship.jpg)

 :o
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: Darby on March 2, 2004, 11:21 PM
I'm truly excited.  I said it before and I'll say it again: We gotta get up there!   ;D
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: Ben on March 3, 2004, 01:16 AM
Sweet! Makes me wonder what kind of life and/or civilization populated that planet.
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: DSJ™ on March 3, 2004, 10:27 AM
(http://www.rebirthman.de/alien/alien_mars2.jpg)

(http://www.physics.hku.hk/links/int_article/mars_life/alien2.gif)

(http://www.americanspiritstudios.com/fab92c80.jpg)

(http://areasonableman.com/Images/Marvin_small.gif)

(http://www.scifi.com/sfw/issue307/martian.jpg)

(http://www.abbottandcostellocollectibles.com/images/postc_acmars.jpg)

(http://www.scifidimensions.com/Mar00/angry-spider.jpg)

(http://www.pastis.org/jade/octobre01/cinemars.jpg)

(http://www.nostalgiacentral.com/images_tv/comedy/myfave666.jpg)

(http://www.shillpages.com/movies/marsneedswomen1967dvd.gif)
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: Ben on March 3, 2004, 02:06 PM
Oh, so Mars is made of cheese. I see. 8)
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: DSJ™ on March 6, 2004, 07:34 AM
The rover Spirit has found evidence of past water activity.

Another Mars rover finds more evidence of water (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/03/05/mars.rovers.ap/index.html)

Thats 2 for 2 on the rover expedition.  8)
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: paploo on March 6, 2004, 10:14 AM
in the second article, is that a grumpy man or a really ugly woman with the giant white wig... shim rules
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: Vator on March 6, 2004, 10:55 AM
This is the beging of the new era for Nasa, maybe now they will go back to trying to find life, rather than count out the possibility.
Title: 10 th Planet Found?
Post by: DSJ™ on March 15, 2004, 12:12 PM
Look like we may have a new planet in our system. NASA is set to make an official announcement later today.

Scientists: Most distant object in solar system found Pt1 (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/03/14/planet.discovery/)

Scientists: Most distant object in solar system found Pt2 (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/03/15/distant.object/index.html)
Title: Re: 10 th Planet Found?
Post by: Vator on March 15, 2004, 03:54 PM
I hate the name it should be called Nibiru since that's what the Sumerians (the fist advanced civilization) called it. Or at the very least Marduk since that's what the Babylonians changed it too.  :-\

I am quite disapointed in NASA for this...
Title: Re: 10 th Planet Found?
Post by: LandotheScoundrel on March 15, 2004, 04:18 PM
I hate the name it should be called Nibiru since that's what the Sumerians (the fist advanced civilization) called it. Or at the very least Marduk since that's what the Babylonians changed it too.  :-\

I am quite disapointed in NASA for this...

Are you talking about that "Planet X" nonsense?
Title: Re: 10 th Planet Found?
Post by: Vator on March 15, 2004, 05:14 PM
edit: Sedna is more like ''Little Mumu'' described by the Sumerians, a planet closer to the Sun than Nibiru, I feel like a tard for not catching that...
Title: Re: 10 th Planet Found?
Post by: Mainland05 on March 15, 2004, 06:07 PM
I think that is so cool!!!

I like the name Sedna, and it is amazing, how the sun looks. Also Is it a "ice planey" like pluto?

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2004/TECH/space/03/15/distant.object/story.object.jpg)
Title: Re: 10 th Planet Found?
Post by: Dressel Rebel on March 15, 2004, 06:17 PM
Well, Democrats had to come from somewhere.

 :-X
Title: Re: 10 th Planet Found?
Post by: Vator on March 15, 2004, 06:18 PM
That's just a computer model you know.

And yes it is an icy planet much like Pluto, except it's colder, much colder.
Title: Re: 10 th Planet Found?
Post by: Famine on March 15, 2004, 06:42 PM
Well, Democrats had to come from somewhere.

 :-X


Hahahahaha! I love you. But I love SFG.

Damn you, lust!

Kevin
Title: Re: 10 th Planet Found?
Post by: Playgirl on March 17, 2004, 10:53 PM
ooooooh may wanna watch the political jokes there   :-X.  I too think this is exciting, but not as exciting as winning the lottery or anything.
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: Scott on March 24, 2004, 11:51 PM
5 Planets Visible at one time (http://story.news.yahoo.com/fc?cid=34&tmpl=fc&in=Science&cat=Astronomy_and_Space)

Pretty cool, my son right now is really into the moon and sun (sun go night night...moon go night night)

He noticed Venus tonight as we were coming into the house "Dad...Star!"  "No son that's the planet Venus, although the Ancients thought it to be a lush garden planet due to its brilliant appearance...its actually a ball of toxic hot gases"..."Dad...Star!"

I still remember my telescope from when I was a kid, I need to get Max one too when he's older, its pretty cool

Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: DSJ™ on March 25, 2004, 08:43 AM
I'm looking forward to seeing some nice pictures captured on film. I hope they show up on the Astronomy Picture of the Day Archive (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html). They have fantastic pictures in high resolution stored.  8)
Title: Re: Hot, wet Mars action!!!
Post by: DSJ™ on March 26, 2004, 09:01 AM
Wow, a very nice picture of the start of the 5 planets taken on March 23rd.  8)

Moon and Planets Sky
 (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/astropix.html)
Title: Re: What Floor? Uh, Moon Please
Post by: Scott on June 29, 2004, 10:25 AM
Space Elevator in 15 Years? (http://story.news.yahoo.com/news?tmpl=story&cid=624&ncid=624&e=4&u=/ap/20040629/ap_on_sc/space_elevator_1)
Title: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Rob on September 8, 2004, 12:22 PM
http://www.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/09/08/genesis.entry.cnn/index.html

I'm watching live NASA tv on my computer... crazy stuff.  The parachute never deployed...
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Angry Ewok on September 8, 2004, 12:26 PM
Maybe it's not Genesis at all... maybe its... INVADERS!

 >:(
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Scott on September 8, 2004, 12:31 PM
Damn, when will the Genesis Wave start circling the planet?

RIP Genesis, BTW, has it been confirmed on Bloody-Disgusting.com?
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Scott on September 8, 2004, 12:33 PM
(http://us.news2.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/ap/20040908/capt.dn40109081620.genesis_crash_dn401.jpg)

Here it is, what's left of it
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: DSJ™ on September 8, 2004, 12:34 PM
Yeah, just watched it live on the www.jpl.nasa.gov (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/index.cfm) site.
 
Ouch!

 (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/genesis/0859a-250-188.jpg) (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/genesis/0859a-browse.jpg)

Suppose to be this.

 (http://www.genesismission.org/mission/images/9-01-004sm.jpg) (http://www.genesismission.org/mission/images/9-01-004.jpg)

Going to take them awhile to dig it out.
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Rob on September 8, 2004, 12:44 PM

RIP Genesis, BTW, has it been confirmed on Bloody-Disgusting.com?

BD.com is usually about 2 days behind on the news since all they do is take news from other websites and re-post it (sound familiar?).  So we won't know until Friday or Saturday.
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: DSJ™ on September 8, 2004, 12:56 PM
For those who did not see it land crash...

Space Capsule Crashes (http://video.msn.com/video/p.htm?t=1&i=c70f4ab2-d6d3-4aa2-a350-297d23205994)

Hope this works as the MSN site was changing there video when I grabbed this.
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Darth Kenobi on September 8, 2004, 01:19 PM
Just watched it on the link Dale provided.  Looking at it was sad knowing that they were concern about it hitting hard and messing up the data it had collected.   Hopefully they can still use some of the data. 
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: DSJ™ on September 9, 2004, 10:24 PM
Some really good pictures of the Genesis Recovery.   8)

Genesis Mission Pictures (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/genesis/multimedia/Genesis_Recovery_images(Search_Agent)_archive_1.html)
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: DSJ™ on September 11, 2004, 01:54 AM
Seems to be some good news on Genesis.  8)

Genesis Scientists Bouncing Back from Hard Landing
September 10, 2004  (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.cfm?release=2004-228)
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Sprry75 on September 15, 2004, 09:10 AM
"KHAAAAAAAN!"
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Scott on September 15, 2004, 10:51 AM
"KHAAAAAAAN!"
Nobody got my earlier reference, this one may be a little clearer Sprry :P
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Sprry75 on September 16, 2004, 09:10 AM
Star Trek references on a Star Wars board, buddy.

We may as well be strangers in a strange land ;)
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Rob on September 16, 2004, 10:10 AM
Or Dorks in nerdland.
Title: Re: Genesis Crashes.
Post by: Angry Ewok on September 17, 2004, 12:51 AM
Or Dorks in nerdland.

Nice.
Title: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: DSJ™ on October 4, 2004, 11:22 AM
The little craft that could!  8)

Privately funded craft reaches altitude requirement (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/10/04/spaceshipone.attempt.cnn/index.html)

They did it!  8)  Congrats!  (http://www.cheesebuerger.de/smilies/lustig/9.gif)

Scaled Composites (http://www.scaled.com/projects/tierone/)

(http://www.planet.nl/upload_mm/6/2/6/1977882393_1999998864_spaceshipone.jpg)
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: SilverZ on October 4, 2004, 11:39 PM
Really cool.

And dammit, I forgot each time to make the drive out and watch (I certainly had the time). Would have been cool to have been there, being this is the most significant advance in spaceflight to take place during my lifetime. Bummer.
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: General Grievous on October 5, 2004, 03:06 PM
I don't get it. Didn't it cost them more than 10 million to build this thing in the first place?
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: Famine on October 5, 2004, 04:15 PM
That may be, but I hear they are going to try and grab at the 50 million dollar prize that's up next.


That should cover the cost of fuel, right?

Kevin
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: SilverZ on October 5, 2004, 06:43 PM
October 4, 1957: Sputnik 1 launched, first artificial satellite in space
October 4, 2004: Gordon Cooper, astronaut in US's first manned space program, dies
October 4, 2004: SpaceShipOne launched, first civilian reusable spacecraft makes back-to-back flights in 7 days

Strange, eh?
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: DSJ™ on October 5, 2004, 09:44 PM
Fame, glory, investment. No bucks, no Buck Rogers. A place in the history books. Cost money to make money.

Sir Richard Branson, Virgin Group Sign Deal with Paul G. Allen’s Mojave Aerospace  (http://www.scaled.com/projects/tierone/092704_scaled_paul_allen_virgin_galactic.htm)

Next up, the X Prize Cup!

The first X Prize Cup will be held in 2005-06 at White Sands Missile Range. It will then move to an area 30 miles north of Las Cruces, where a facility dubbed the Southwest Regional Spaceport will be built.

Teams will compete in five categories to win the overall cup: fastest turnaround time between the first launch and second landing, maximum number of passengers per launch, total number of passengers during the competition, maximum altitude and fastest flight time.
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: CorranHorn on October 11, 2004, 10:12 PM
While I'm all for the privatizing of space travel/exploration as a means to prevent the futility of modern day NASA, I wonder how much innovation will come out of this. Will the privatization of space lead to breakthroughs never before seen or will it just prove to be another way for multi-billion international conglomerates to make a quick buck. Congrats though to the SS1 team, doing something that not even NASA could pull off, kudos!
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: DSJ™ on October 22, 2004, 10:12 AM
Shatner aims for real 'Star Trek' (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/WORLD/europe/10/22/branson.space/index.html)

Quote
The "Star Trek" star is among more than 7,000 people who have told Richard Branson they would gladly pay him $210,000 (£115,000) for a trip aboard his planned spacecraft, the entrepreneur said Friday.
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: Famine on October 23, 2004, 09:23 PM
Thats nice for all of those millionaires, and such, but what about Average Joe who can't afford that sort of cash? Am I earthbound for life?


Kevin
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: CorranHorn on October 24, 2004, 03:53 AM
Thats nice for all of those millionaires, and such, but what about Average Joe who can't afford that sort of cash? Am I earthbound for life?


Kevin

I heard recently that within the next decade that if sub-orbital flights similar to what spaceship one did is more common, it could an average of $10,000 per person. could be interesting if that is the case, sure its still a lot of money, but its something some people could save up for and be in reach of the goal
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: Famine on October 24, 2004, 12:44 PM
Right. Now I need to find 10,000 bucks.

Do I at least get peanuts on the flight?


Kevin
Title: Re: SpaceShipOne captures X Prize
Post by: DSJ™ on October 24, 2004, 12:56 PM
Right. Now I need to find 10,000 bucks.

Do I at least get peanuts on the flight?


Kevin

I think they will hand out M&M's on the filight. Maybe sort of a nod to Mike Melvill!  ;)

Heres the site to Virgin Galactic  (http://www.virgingalactic.com/)
Title: Re: Manned Mission To Mars, Moon
Post by: DSJ™ on January 3, 2005, 07:29 PM
Hard to believe that a year later, the Mars rovers are still working hard.

Rover hits one-year mark on Mars  (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/01/03/rover.anniversary/index.html)

Great stuff on the Mars Exploration Program (http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/index.html)   8)
Title: Water on Mars!
Post by: Ben on April 1, 2005, 08:42 PM
(http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0504/WaterOnMars2_gcc.jpg)
Title: Re: Water on Mars!
Post by: Scott on April 1, 2005, 08:46 PM
 ::) :P :-*
Title: Re: Water on Mars!
Post by: DSJ™ on April 1, 2005, 08:55 PM
(http://www.athenamama.com/images/Mars_Water.jpg)

 :P
Title: Re: Water on Mars!
Post by: JoshEEE on April 1, 2005, 09:57 PM
Hmmmm. I suppose it would be much too easy to post any of the obvious "Uranus" jokes (or pictures) in this thread now, wouldn't it?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2005, 01:25 AM
In just less than 1/2 hour, Deep Impact will is scheduled to collide with Comet Tempel 1.   8)  The pictures coming back are amazing.

You can watch it live on the NASA channel.

NASA TV via the Internet  (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2005, 01:58 AM
We have Impact!  (http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/woohoo.gif)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: CorranHorn on July 4, 2005, 02:16 AM
did they have footage of the impact? probably not, as I just saw pics prior to the impactor getting innudated with dust from the comet. still cool nonethless
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2005, 02:23 AM
Yeah, just the same thing you saw. Bright flashes of light on and off from the dust then a shot of the Comet spuing it's dust from the Impact. Looks very bright like the sun coming out behind the Comet. I'm trying to find some online pics but none posted thus far. Sounds like they had the Hubbles Telescope snapping shots of this.

Chalk another on up for NASA, they hit the target right on the money.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2005, 02:45 AM
Damn site is getting hits, slowing down.  :-\

Pic before impact.

(http://news.softpedia.com/images//news2/Deep-Impact-Space-Probe-Mission-Complete-Success-2.jpg)

After impact.   :o

(http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/images/hp-confirmation.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2005, 03:02 AM
A bigger pic of the impact.

(http://deepimpact.umd.edu/images/Confirmation.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Angry Ewok on July 4, 2005, 03:35 AM
I'm scared...  :-[
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2005, 03:57 AM
So you should be!  :P

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/121406main_MRIVIS-0450_web.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/121414main_MRIVIS-0454_web.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Lady Jaye on July 4, 2005, 11:18 AM
Well if anyone has NASA TV, check out the channel, they're airing the press conference!!!! And they have a whole bunch of pics along with a Q&A section!!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: CorranHorn on July 4, 2005, 05:17 PM
The news had a really neat animation of images showing the impact from the impactor's point of view. Hopefully, they'll learn a lot from this, to help better our understanding of how all of this happened...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2005, 10:07 PM
Pics from the Hubbles Telescope.   8)

 (http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/2005/17/images/a/formats/web.jpg) (http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/2005/17/images/a/formats/web_print.jpg)

Press Relese Videos (http://hubblesite.org/newscenter/newsdesk/archive/releases/2005/17/video/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: CorranHorn on July 5, 2005, 01:37 AM
that was pretty neat, kinda looked like a star blowing up.  i wonder what i looked like in color.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 5, 2005, 02:48 PM
No color pics thus far.  :-\

This image shows comet Tempel 1 sixty seconds before it ran over NASA's Deep Impact probe at 10:52 p.m. Pacific time, July 3 (1:52 a.m. Eastern time, July 4). The picture was taken by the probe's impactor targeting sensor.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/121481main_pia02120.jpg)

This image of Tempel 1 was taken by the high-resolution camera aboard Deep Impact's flyby spacecraft after the mission's impactor collided with the comet.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/121507main_hri-070405-330.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: JediMAC on July 5, 2005, 02:56 PM
We were glued to the tube for this one the other night as well.  Absolutely mindboggling that they could nail that thing with something the size of a washing machine that far away from Earth.  Very "Hollywood-esque", for sure.  I was just praying that they wouldn't accidentally knock the think ON COURSE with the Earth, but I heard them address that later on, saying they'd taken that into consideration, and that there was no possibility of that happening, thank God.

So Dale, when do they start determining the makeup of the comet?  And are they really just going to attempt to do that solely based on photographic reference, or is the orbiter probe thingee collecting any fragments or samples as well?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 5, 2005, 03:12 PM
So Dale, when do they start determining the makeup of the comet?  And are they really just going to attempt to do that solely based on photographic reference, or is the orbiter probe thingee collecting any fragments or samples as well?

So far in the news:

Quote
Deep Impact craft may get second mission:

BOULDER, Colo., July 5 (UPI) -- Scientists were evaluating Tuesday whether the Deep Impact Flyby spacecraft is capable of embarking on a second comet interception.
 
Jubilation over Monday's successful launch of an impactor device into the comet Tempel 1 turned to cold analysis for scientists at NASA and Ball Aerospace & Technologies Corporation in Boulder, Colo., which manufactured the two-part spacecraft.

Ball Deputy Director of Programs in Civil Space Systems Monte Henderson told Space.com engineers were attempting to determine how much dust and debris from the collision hit the Flyby craft.

If little damage has been done, Henderson said the craft could be redeployed to send it on a 3.5 year cruise to Comet Boethin, which orbits the Sun every 11 years. It was discovered Jan. 4, 1975, during a routine comet-hunting scan by the late Rev. Leo Boethin of the Philippines.

Based on fuel and trajectory, the redirection would have to take place before July 24, Henderson said.

Oh this is ******* rich!  ::)

Quote
Russian astrologist sues NASA for Deep Impact.

Russian astrologist Marina Bai has filed suit in a Moscow asking for 8.7 billion rubles (311 million U.S. dollars) because,she claims, the NASA Deep Impact mission damaged her business by altering her ability to provide accurate horoscopes, harmed her "system of spiritual values," and will "interfere with the natural life of the universe."

"It is obvious that elements of the comet's orbit, and correspondingly the ephemeris, will change after the explosion, which interferes with my astrology work and distorts my horoscope," Bai was quoted in the daily newspaper, Izvestia.

NASA has refuted similar accusations by pointing out that this impact is only a new addition to many previous collisions already on the comet.

On July 4, NASA successfully crashed a probe into the Temple 1 comet in hopes the debris kicked up in the resulting explosion could shed light in the building blocks of the early solar system.

The lawsuit, originally filed in June, has not yet been scheduled for an initial hearing, according to Russian authorities.


From the Deep Impact site:

The flyby spacecraft carries two instruments for observing the impact and its effects within visible light wavelengths. There is a Medium Resolution Instrument (MRI), which produces "the big picture" of the comet and has a field of view of 0.587 degrees or about the diameter of the moon as seen from Earth. It will have a maximum predicted resolution of about 10 meters/pixel.

In addition, there is a High Resolution Instrument (HRI) to give a closer and more detailed look at the comet. It has a field of view of 0.118 degrees or one-fifth the diameter of the moon as seen from Earth. The HRI has a maximum predicted resolution of about 2 meters/pixel. Both instruments will be pointed at the impact site on the comet nucleus, recording the expansion of the impact ejecta curtain and peering inside of the freshly formed crater.

The satellite is more for pictures, I don't think it's for collecting fragment samples. Would be nice to have a little sample of dust taken and sent back to earth but you remember what happened to the Genesis probe.  :-\

(http://images.spaceref.com/news/2004/09.08.04.genesis.4.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 6, 2005, 01:06 AM
Just an update on the Space Program:

NASA: Shuttle launch date July 13 (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/06/30/space.shuttle/index.html)

It's been along haul since the Columbia accident, almost 2 1/2 years. I will be glued to the TV set and the online NASA channel.

(http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-114/med/sts114-s-002.jpg)

You can read more on NASA'S Return to Flight Here (http://www.nasa.gov/returntoflight/main/?skipIntro=1)   :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 6, 2005, 04:46 AM
This spectacular image of comet Tempel 1 was taken 67 seconds after it obliterated Deep Impact's impactor spacecraft. The image was taken by the high-resolution camera on the mission's flyby craft. Scattered light from the collision saturated the camera's detector, creating the bright splash seen here. Linear spokes of light radiate away from the impact site, while reflected sunlight illuminates most of the comet surface. The image reveals topographic features, including ridges, scalloped edges and possibly impact craters formed long ago.

(http://deepimpact.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/jpg/HRI_937_1-med.jpg)

This video is just amazing, just click on Play Tempel 1 movie in the link below.   8)

Capturing the Flash (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/deepimpact/multimedia/070405-HRI-impact.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 6, 2005, 11:10 AM
Wow, Great video! Thanks for posting the link!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on July 6, 2005, 04:35 PM
Hey!  I think it says ILM at the end of that clip!!!  ;D

Just kidding...cool video.

Anyone else here an amature astronomer?  I get my telescope out occaisionally and look up. 
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 13, 2005, 10:09 AM
I wish I owned a telescope, some nights I just head down to the Science Centre and use theres.  ;)

Well just undcer 6 hrs. till the launch of Discovery and the Return To Flight.  8)

You can catch it live on the TV or the NASA network or on Yahoo. Launch takes place at 3:51 pm ET.

Watch NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html?skipIntro=1)

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/07/12/space.shuttle/vert.rollout.0615.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: sfg on July 13, 2005, 02:09 PM
not today.

 :(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 13, 2005, 02:16 PM
not today.

 :(

Yeah, ****!  :-\

Shuttle launch called off
Fuel sensor delays Discovery's liftoff (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/07/13/space.shuttle/index.html)

Tomorrow's another day tho.   ;)   :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Famine on July 13, 2005, 03:14 PM
Shucks, I had my spacesuit on, and everything. >:(

Kevin
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 13, 2005, 03:21 PM
Shucks, I had my spacesuit on, and everything. >:(

Kevin

Are you wearing your space Underoos?  :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 20, 2005, 11:24 AM
36 years ago today. July 20, 1969. Neil Armstrong walks on the moon.

"That's one small step for (a) man, one giant leap for mankind." (http://wps.prenhall.com/wps/media/objects/1351/1384400/video/smallstep_scaled.mov)

(http://www.hq.nasa.gov/office/pao/History/SP-4205/images/c350b.jpg)

The real truth: It's a very mysterious  (http://www.gaiaguys.net/moontruth.mpg)   :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: sfg on July 26, 2005, 09:53 AM
Hopefully they should be lighting the candle in about an hour.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 26, 2005, 10:55 AM
We're back! The Launch was beautiful and the view from the main tank was just stunning!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Famine on July 26, 2005, 04:20 PM
Hooray! I prolonged and dragged out my work all morning, just so I could watch this go off this morning, and I'm glad I did! ;D

I'm impressed at the coverage all the news networks used. They had people who actually knew what they were talking about.

Kevin
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 26, 2005, 08:30 PM
We're back! The Launch was beautiful and the view from the main tank was just stunning!

I missed it as I was at work but I just watched it on the NASA web site.

Shuttle Returns to Space, Heads to Space Station (http://www.nasa.gov/returntoflight/main/index.html)

Super lift off and that view from the External tank is something.  8)

Tho not out of the woods yet, they have to inspect the shuttle for any damage, deliver supplies to the station and do some repairs and bring them all safely home.

Looks like some debris was spotted during liftoff so there checking that out.

NASA examining video of debris spotted during liftoff (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/07/26/space.shuttle/index.html)

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/07/26/space.shuttle/top.1510.shuttle.debris.nas.jpg)

 (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/122979main_05pd1735_330.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123182main_05pd1735.jpg)

This shot below is amazing, click on the pic for a bigger view.  8)

 (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123527main_1736-sc.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123524main_1736-lg.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: JediMAC on July 27, 2005, 07:20 PM
Looks like some debris was spotted during liftoff so there checking that out.

After hearing over the past couple days that the piece of debris was no big deal, I just received this CNN breaking news story in my inbox:

Quote
-- NASA grounds the space shuttle progam while engineers determine the effects of debris falling from Discovery during blastoff.

That sucks.  Hope everything turns out OK.  Dale, do we have the ability to fix something like this now, or maybe the folks at the International Space Station, perhaps?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darby on July 27, 2005, 09:00 PM
This is sad, because for all intents and purposes, this is it.  The cost of 'fixing' the foam problem more than likely outweighs the sense of keeping the shuttle operational.  There will be a lot of people in NASA and in government clamoring to move on.    :(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 27, 2005, 09:32 PM
That sucks.  Hope everything turns out OK.  Dale, do we have the ability to fix something like this now, or maybe the folks at the International Space Station, perhaps?

Thanks for the update Matt.  :)

Oh bloody great, this could or could not be bad. NASA is not going to take any chances, during lift off, they had more than 100 cameras on the ground plus camers on the tanlk and shuttle and two planes that monitored Discovery. Every angle was covered.

Quite the chunk of foam that came off but it sounds like it did not hit the shuttle.

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/07/27/space.shuttle/story.shuttle.debris.jpg)

Foam is missing from the tank in an image taken from the orbiter.

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/07/27/space.shuttle/story.foam.gone.jpg)

The main issue is the foam, until NASA can stop this foam from coming off, the fleet is grounded. From what I just saw on the CCN news feed, the chunk of foam that came off is around the liquid oxygen feedline around where it's circled in this pic from the NASA archive.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/116133main_LFB330.jpg)

This is what happened to Columbia and the impact was catastrophic.   :'(

This is a pic of what the foam looks like as an example.

(http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts107/030205foam/etfoam.jpg)

Improvments of the area of foam.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/108421main_bipod_change.jpg)

The bipod fitting that helps attach the External Tank to the orbiter has been redesigned. The old design, left, used a foam ramp to prevent ice from building up on the fitting. Falling foam opened a hole in one of Columbia's wings, leading to the orbiter's breakup on entry. The new design, right, uses heaters instead of foam, to prevent ice buildup.

Sounds like a chipped thermal tile on space shuttle Discovery's belly does not appear to be a serious problem, based on what engineers have seen so far.

(http://image.guardian.co.uk/sys-images/Guardian/Pix/pictures/2005/07/27/nasa3.jpg)
 
The crew of the ISS (International Space Station) have no means of repairing the shuttle.

As for the Discovery crew that can make repairs, maybe. I was watching Discovery Channel at work today and they showed some equipment/tools that have to be tested to make repairs. This has only been tested on the ground but not in space.

I saw what looks like a caulking gun and another tool to dab some kind of milky foam to cover seams and so forth. There was also a small plug that can be inserted into a hole and then sealed with these tools.

They could also use this to repair the small chunk of tile missing.

I do remember when the Columbia first set sail on April 12th/1981 that some small pieces of tile was report missing.

Quote
OK, we're — we want to tell y'all here we do have a few tiles missing off both of them — off the starboard pod, basically it got what appears to be 3 tile and some smaller pieces and off the port pod — looks like — I see one full square and looks like a few little triangular shapes that are missing and we are trying to put that on TV right now.

(http://www.planetburrito.com/tb/space_shuttle/columbia_10b.gif)

There are over 30,000 heat tiles on the shuttle. Each have there own serial number and shape and size.

(http://static.redjupiter.com/images/2020Hindsight/shuttletilesunderneath16529.jpg)(http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts114/031107crew/lawrence.jpg)

As for the the Unthinkable (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/ap_rtf_sts121_rescue_050321.html) you can read the link.

There was also a bird impact during liftoff but only on the External tank.

(http://images.theglobeandmail.com/archives/RTGAM/images/20050727/wshuttl0727/birdhit2.jpg)

Besides the dangers posed by the shuttle's foam insulation, in this photo a bird hits the nose cone of the External Fueltank on Tuesday as the Discovery lifts off.

Man, this is Columbia all over again and just about as close to a Sci-Fi book I read back in 1981 called "Shuttle Down".

(http://i8.ebayimg.com/01/i/04/0c/d4/45_1_b.JPG)

NASA will do everything in there power to bring the crew of Discovery home safe and sound.  ;)

Gene Kranz... "Failure is not an option."  (http://new.wavlist.com/movies/098/a13-failure.wav)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on July 27, 2005, 10:39 PM
I saw the bird-strike on the news....I wonder how many PETA protesters are protesting now?

I just finished a Master's course called Aricraft & Spacecraft design.  We have the technology to make an actual space plane, that when completed could make cheaper space missions and eventually build us up for a true spacestation and interplanetary/possibly interstellar missions.  The problem is politics.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 27, 2005, 11:15 PM
Lots of birds get killed during launches whether it be splat like a bug or fried from the flames. I think the deal about it now is beacuse of all the cameras they have and this one was one that got snapped.

(http://media.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/photo/2005/07/27/PH2005072700267.jpg)

One thing I forgot to mention is the shuttle has damage sensors installed into the wings to detect any impact damage caused by launch debris or orbiting space junk.

A space plane eh Matt, someone has to give Rutan/Branson of Virgin Galactic a run for there money.  ;)

Yeah, the politics of spaceflight and so forth is nasty, best left alone. 
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 28, 2005, 09:11 AM
Discovery docks with space station  (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/07/28/space.shuttle/index.html)

Image credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123661main_337feetaway.jpg)

The International Space Station crew snapped this image of Space Shuttle Discovery at a distance of 337 feet.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123660main_flip.jpg)

Space Shuttle Discovery executes a backflip, exposing its underside for visual inspection by the Station crew.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123665main_iss_docking1.jpg)

The International Space Station is viewed through Discovery's docking ring during approach.

Here's some shots of the External tank.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123619main_s114e5014_low.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123613main_s114e5002_low.jpg)

These are good shots showing where the foam detached.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123628main_hh_umb_no_annotation1_5002.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123626main_s114e5070_low.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123634main_uw_et_zoom_5070.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 28, 2005, 11:21 AM
Nice stuf Dale, Thanks.

The thing about Columbia that made me stop and think was is the fact that foam has been comming off durring evey lift off and that was the first time that it caused significant damage. It made realize that evey launch was a craps shoot, kind of a scary thought (beyond the million technical things that could go wrong.) I certainly hope they can figure it out, but perhapse this will push them toward a new launch vehicle.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 28, 2005, 07:52 PM
Better news thus far.  8)

"The initial report was that it looks extremely good," flight operations and integration manager John Shannon said Thursday.

"We don't have anything to worry about," he added.

NASA: Discovery unaffected by falling foam (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/07/28/space.shuttle/index.html)

Damn, this picture is awesome! Clicky for a bigger view.  8)

 (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123744main1_rpm_photo1_330.gif) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123745main_rpm_photo1_full.jpg)

An image from the International Space Station shows Discovery as it performs a backflip to allow detailed photography of the Shuttle's heat shield.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123675main_greeting2.jpg)

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/07/28/space.shuttle/story.onboard.jpg)

The International Space Station crew greets the Discovery crew.

You have to check this short video out of Discovery doing the Pitch Maneuver. :o   :o   8)

Just click the link below and go to the right, it's just below the Elapsed Time clock of the mission (Related Media).  :)

Space Shuttle Pitch Maneuver (http://www.nasa.gov/returntoflight/main/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on July 28, 2005, 08:37 PM
Nice stuf Dale, Thanks.

The thing about Columbia that made me stop and think was is the fact that foam has been comming off durring evey lift off and that was the first time that it caused significant damage. It made realize that evey launch was a craps shoot, kind of a scary thought (beyond the million technical things that could go wrong.) I certainly hope they can figure it out, but perhapse this will push them toward a new launch vehicle.

Actually, the original foam they used on the tanks did not break off as much.  But NASA engineers decided to change the foam sometime in the 90's to make it more "environmentally friendly" That's when the orbiters were sustaining damage due to foam breaking off of the tank.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 28, 2005, 09:08 PM
Nice stuf Dale, Thanks.

The thing about Columbia that made me stop and think was is the fact that foam has been comming off durring evey lift off and that was the first time that it caused significant damage. It made realize that evey launch was a craps shoot, kind of a scary thought (beyond the million technical things that could go wrong.) I certainly hope they can figure it out, but perhapse this will push them toward a new launch vehicle.

Actually, the original foam they used on the tanks did not break off as much.  But NASA engineers decided to change the foam sometime in the 90's to make it more "environmentally friendly" That's when the orbiters were sustaining damage due to foam breaking off of the tank.

Indeed, good memory Matt.  :)

STS-87 (http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/people/journals/space/katnik/sts87-12-23.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: sfg on July 29, 2005, 02:06 PM
Brilliant image of the nose of the inverted orbiter on the front page of today's New York Times.  This scan doesn't do it justice; it takes up almost the whole front page above the fold.

(http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/07/29/nytfrontpage/scannat.jpg)

 :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 29, 2005, 08:00 PM
Hey, nice shot sfg.   8)  I saved that one, thanks.  :)

(http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/media.canada.com/cp/world/20050729/w072930a.jpg)

This image released by NASA showstile damage on the underside of the space shuttle Discovery. (AP Photo/NASA)

Busy day it was for the crew of Discovery attaching the Logistics Module and unloading 15 tons of supplies and equipment. 

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123937main_sts114_canadarm_raffaello2.jpg)

The Station's robotic arm, Canadarm2, grapples the Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module inside the Shuttle's payload bay. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/07/29/space.shuttle/story.cargo.mod.jpg)

The Raffaello Multi-Purpose Logistics Module en route to installation on the international space station.

Sounds like the shuttle is fine for it's return on August 7th but NASA officials may extending Discovery's mission by one day. The shuttle's crew plans to test tile repair techniques during three spacewalks by astronauts Steve Robinson and Soichi Noguchi of Japan. The two also will service the international space station.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Vator on July 29, 2005, 11:37 PM
10TH PLANET FOUND!

http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,164171,00.html

For the love of God, name it Nibiru!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 29, 2005, 11:52 PM
Took them awhile to check it all out.

Scientists: Most distant object in solar system found (http://edition.cnn.com/2004/TECH/space/03/14/planet.discovery/)

Astronomers discover 'new planet' (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/3511678.stm)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Vator on July 29, 2005, 11:59 PM
The whole hacker part is interesting, how long did they intend to hold that information from us?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 30, 2005, 04:58 AM
I just watched more incredible footage from the shuttle. You can check them out here:

STS-114 Mission (Gallery, videos and animation clips) (http://www.space.gc.ca/asc/eng/missions/sts-114/gallery.asp)

More updated news.

Astronauts to take spacewalk (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/07/29/space.shuttle/index.html)

Discovery astronauts Steve Robinson and Soichi Noguchi will suit up and step outside at 4:44 a.m. ET Saturday for the first of three spacewalks.

They plan to test tile repair techniques in the payload bay and repair a gyroscope on the international space station during the 6-1/2 hour spacewalk.

They will not be making any repairs to Discovery itself, said deputy shuttle manager Wayne Hale.

Areas of interest:

While a detailed examination of Discovery's exterior, thanks to high-resolution cameras and lasers, showed no serious damage, Hale said, three areas of interest are being evaluated further:


Near the door covering the orbiter's nose landing gear, a piece of tile is missing, about three-quarters of an inch long, three inches wide and less than four-tenths of an inch deep. The missing piece is not deep enough to have breached the tile's outermost thermal barrier, Hale said. "I'm feeling very confident that this is not going to be anything significant for us to worry about."


At two locations on the underbelly of the orbiter, ceramic "gap fillers" -- which are placed in between tiles -- have protruded outward. The main concern is that the protrusions can change the aerodynamics of the spacecraft during re-entry, increasing the amount of heat the tiles will have to endure, Hale said. NASA engineers are running tests to determine how much the protrusions -- which have happened during previous shuttle flights -- might increase the heat and what effect that might have on the vehicle, he said.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Famine on July 30, 2005, 01:34 PM
At least they have the station as refuge incase they need to stick around untill they can be "rescued" if needed.

Kevin
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 30, 2005, 11:47 PM
Looks like there a go to return home olus the mission is extened 1 day.  :)

NASA declares shuttle safe for return (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/07/30/space.shuttle/index.html)

I'm watching a NASA TV on the spacewalk from earlier today.

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/rids/20050730/i/r3588306699.jpg)

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050730/capt.dn31807301614.space_shuttle_dn318.jpg)

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/rids/20050730/i/r1105814931.jpg)

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050730/capt.dn31607301453.space_shuttle_dn316.jpg)   :)

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050730/capt.dn31407301338.space_shuttle_dn314.jpg)

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050730/capt.dn31107301231.space_shuttle_dn311.jpg)

In this image from NASA TV space shuttle Discovery Mission Specialist Soichi Noguchi uses an emittance wash applicator during the thermal protection test in a space walk, Saturday, July 30, 2005. AP Photo/NASA TV.

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050730/capt.dn30807301133.space_shuttle_dn308.jpg)

In this image from NASA TV Shuttle Discovery Mission Specialist Steve Robinson holds a putty knife that he used in the thermal protection repair test during a space walk Saturday, July 30, 2005. AP Photo/NASA TV.

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/afp/20050729/capt.sge.qfs85.290705222525.photo03.photo.default-378x271.jpg)

A view from the US space shuttle Discovery shows a docked Russian Soyuz spacecraft (L) and the US Destiny lab with its docking port (R) on the International Space Station, 28 July 2005 AFP/NASA-HO.

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050728/capt.ny11907282300.space_shuttle_ny119.jpg)

This combination of images taken form television shows the space shuttle Discovery performing a 360-degree backflip to enable the crew aboard the ISS to photograph the underside of the shuttle in this view from television Thursday, July 28, 2005. AP Photo/NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 31, 2005, 12:17 PM
Nice stuf Dale, Thanks.

The thing about Columbia that made me stop and think was is the fact that foam has been comming off durring evey lift off and that was the first time that it caused significant damage. It made realize that evey launch was a craps shoot, kind of a scary thought (beyond the million technical things that could go wrong.) I certainly hope they can figure it out, but perhapse this will push them toward a new launch vehicle.

Actually, the original foam they used on the tanks did not break off as much.  But NASA engineers decided to change the foam sometime in the 90's to make it more "environmentally friendly" That's when the orbiters were sustaining damage due to foam breaking off of the tank.

Wow! I didn't know that and that's actually pretty interesting.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 31, 2005, 04:04 PM
NASA ponders hanging strips from space shuttle (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/07/31/shuttle.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on July 31, 2005, 05:32 PM
I think those are actually space ages fly strips so they can help lower the number of mosquitos in the central Florida area.   :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 31, 2005, 05:49 PM
(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/rotfl.gif)  First the birds now the skeeters.  ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 1, 2005, 03:00 AM
This is one cool site to watch different angles of the liftoff. 8)

Discovery's Liftoff (http://msnbc.com/modules/spaceshuttle/discoverylaunch/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 1, 2005, 01:48 PM
Another job well done.  8)

Astronauts complete second spacewalk (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/08/01/space.shuttle/index.html)

Boy, that sure is one cramped airlock, from the 1st spacewalk.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124029main_fd5_iss011e11346_low.jpg)

Discovery woes make Russians proud (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/08/01/russia.space.ap/index.html)

NASA admits 'goofing' Discovery checks (http://www.abc.net.au/news/newsitems/200508/s1426696.htm)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 1, 2005, 11:32 PM
Holy, there going for it. I can't wait to see the video on this.  8)

Shuttle Repairs to Be Tried in Spacewalk.

By JOHN SCHWARTZ and WARREN E. LEARY
Published: August 2, 2005.

HOUSTON, Aug. 1 - Astronauts will perform a landmark spacewalk on Wednesday morning to remove or clip two tiny strips of stiff cloth that are protruding from the belly of the shuttle Discovery and could cause dangerous heating during the craft's fiery re-entry into the atmosphere, officials said Monday.

Astronauts have never ventured to the underside of a shuttle during orbit or performed a safety-oriented repair during a mission.

At a briefing for reporters on Monday evening, mission managers said they were unsure whether the protruding strips of the cloth, known as gap fillers, were the kind of minor annoyance the shuttles had endured many times or whether they could severely damage the vehicle by disturbing the flow of superheated plasma that surrounds the craft in re-entry.

The decision to try the repairs was made Monday afternoon by members of the mission management team, after they reviewed three days of research and analysis by engineers and scientists from around the nation. It required balancing the substantial risks of conducting a spacewalk, or extravehicular activity, with doing nothing on the assumption that all is well.

"When you go E.V.A.," said N. Wayne Hale, the deputy manager of the shuttle program and chairman of the mission management team, "you always take risks." He added, however, that "it was prudent to take action."

Under some of the calculations, Mr. Hale said, the heat caused by one of the strips could expose panels on the leading edge of a wing to more heat than they were designed to resist. By comparison, he said, "the remedy is easy."

The spacewalk, Mr. Hale said, is straightforward, even though it will take astronauts to a part of the shuttle never visited during a mission and even though incidental damage could occur during the work.

Tools have been selected and gathered for the repairs, which will take place during a previously scheduled spacewalk to install a tool cabinet on the outside of the International Space Station.

The first strategy will be for the astronaut, Stephen K. Robinson, to simply grasp the two gap fillers with his thumb and forefinger and try to pluck them out. If that proves impossible, Mr. Hale said, Dr. Robinson will try to cut them with a blade that has been taped on the ends to prevent it from nicking thermal protection tiles. If that does not work, he will trim them to a quarter of an inch with special scissors designed for use in space.

The underside of the shuttle has thousands of gap fillers. As their name implies, they fill the gaps left between the shuttle's heat-resistant tiles so they do not grind against one another when the shuttle's body flexes under extreme temperatures.

Dangling gap fillers have been found before, and they are generally not considered a serious hazard. For that reason, Mr. Hale said, he did not initially encourage the repairs.

But the two gap fillers, one protruding 1.1 inches and the other 0.6 inches, are the longest ones ever measured so close to the shuttle's nose, where they can do the greatest amount of damage downstream. In 1995, the shuttle Columbia returned from a mission with a gap filler that was 0.9 inches long, or 1.4 inches when it was stretched out, and was 10 feet farther back on the bottom of the craft.

Under the safety-conscious environment at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration since the Columbia disaster in 2003, Mr. Hale said, "if we cannot prove that it's safe, then we don't want to go there."

The shuttle can return to Earth without either of these two gap fillers in place, mission managers said, because their chief purpose is to keep tiles from hitting each other during ascent.

The areas of uncertainty are enormous, mission managers said, because the physics of atmospheric entry are numbingly complex and the data on the way materials perform is limited to the 113 previous shuttle flights.

"Nobody else flies Mach 22 at 216,000 feet," said Chuck Campbell, a NASA manager in aerothermodynamics. "The only data that we've got comes from the shuttle."

(http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2005/08/01/science/space/02shuttle_graphic1.gif)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 2, 2005, 08:56 PM
Removing the Gap Fillers: A Spacewalking First (http://www.nasa.gov/returntoflight/crew/EVA_gapfiller.html)
Title: Super Mars!
Post by: Ryan on August 2, 2005, 10:04 PM
I thought I had better let all of you know about this, in case you already don't, but toward the end of this month Earth and Mars' orbits will bring them closer together than they have been for over 5,000 years. And it may be as long as 60,000 years before it happens again, it at least will never happen in any of our life times. It will be closest on August 27th, when it is 34,649,589 miles away. And other than the moon will be the brightest object in the night sky, with a magnitude of -2.9. And will appear 25.11 arc seconds wide. Arc seconds are an astronomical measurement that uses arc length, it has nothing to do with time.

  MARS WILL LOOK AS LARGE AS THE MOON TO THE NAKED EYE!

Currently Mars rises at about 10p.m. in the Eastern sky and reaches it's azimuth (it's highest point in the sky, for those of you who haven't had astronomy) at 3am, by the 27th it with rise around around sunset and reach it's peak by 12:30.

I really can't wait, this could be one of the coolest things I'll ever see in my life. :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 2, 2005, 10:26 PM
I merged your Mars topic in here to keep all the space stuff together.  ;)

Holy crap! Aug 27th is a Saturday.  8)

It better be clear that night, gotta head outside the city for this event. Hope it looks like the pics below.

(http://www.bearvalleynews.com/images/Mars2.jpg)(http://www.bearvalleynews.com/images/Moon.jpg)

Thanks for the heads up SLC.  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 2, 2005, 10:54 PM
NASA lays plans for moon outpost, humans to Mars  (http://fullcoverage.yahoo.com/s/chitribts/nasalaysplansformoonoutposthumanstomars)

Quote
NASA's new road map for the human exploration of space would land four astronauts on the moon by 2018 as the first step toward an eventual six-person voyage to Mars.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scott on August 3, 2005, 12:26 AM
Sorry to burst your bubble but that Mars thing is a hoax
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Famine on August 3, 2005, 12:28 AM
How so?

Proof?

Kevin
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scott on August 3, 2005, 12:28 AM
http://www.snopes.com/science/mars.asp
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jeff on August 3, 2005, 12:30 AM
http://www.snopes.com/science/mars.asp
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scott on August 3, 2005, 12:31 AM
 ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jeff on August 3, 2005, 12:32 AM
;D

D'oh!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on August 3, 2005, 01:32 AM
I was hoping no one would catch that ;), I re-typed it so it wasn't the same. Oh well. :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 3, 2005, 09:10 AM
Hoax... bah!  >:(   :P

Just watching a bit of the repair brfore I head out to work.  8)

Astronaut Steve Robinson removes both pieces of gap filler protruding from shuttle.

Astronaut repairing shuttle: It's going beautifully (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/08/03/space.shuttle/index.html)

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/08/03/space.shuttle/story.robinson.hanging.jpg)

Looks like they did it.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 3, 2005, 09:28 AM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124272main_eva3_gapfill1.jpg)

Mission Specialist Steve Robinson approaches the underside of Discovery. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/08/03/space.shuttle/story.0855.filler2.out.jpg)

Robinson's gloved hands pull the second of two gap fillers from the shuttle's underbelly.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: sfg on August 3, 2005, 05:19 PM
Interesting graphic:

(http://www.fenderforum.com/userphotos/photo.php?id=21745)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: JediMAC on August 3, 2005, 06:23 PM
Wow, that's crazy how many times they've been hit and dinged up by debris over the years.  Thanks for the graphic, sfg.  Not much concern (publicly, anyway) over the issue 'til Columbia disintegrated, I guess...

Of course, now every square inch of the ship is being disected by microscope practically.  But I guess playing it safe is definitely the smart way to go nowadays...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on August 3, 2005, 07:40 PM
I swear you can hear the thumps from Houston from all the knees jerking.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 3, 2005, 08:02 PM
Ride of century.

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/afp/20050803/capt.sge.rjv52.030805220905.photo00.photo.default-380x270.jpg?x=380&y=270&sig=0RBoB.v11dR0KaYSlGjuzg--)

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050803/capt.txdc12308031511.space_shuttle_txdc123.jpg?x=380&y=285&sig=Nutc.cY6v8Dc4sqLAdpZhA--)

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050803/capt.txdc12508031453.space_shuttle_txdc125.jpg?x=380&y=289&sig=KcJqENzFfPfAhF_4XJx_Ow--)

The space shuttle Discovery's robotic arm gives NASA workers a close-up view of the damage to the thermal blanket in this view Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2005. AP Photo/NASA TV.

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/cpress/20050803/capt.g080308a.jpg?x=240&y=249&sig=O.6hf7kvOad1D0G2Cos2gA--)

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050803/capt.txdc12008031358.space_shuttle_txdc120.jpg?x=380&y=288&sig=5F7cXEmiTbp_M.cxpBu5Kg--)

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050803/capt.txdc10108030647.space_shuttle_txdc101.jpg?x=380&y=285&sig=3lHYkxoE_OF6Xb2FG2KeSA--)

A bubble in the thermal blanket near the commander's window on the port side of the space shuttle Discovery is visible in this black and white view from television Wednesday, Aug. 3, 2005. AP Photo/NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on August 3, 2005, 09:41 PM
I doubt that's much to worry about.  It's nowhere near any of the leading edges and will not feel a fraction of the friction.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 3, 2005, 10:13 PM
Discovery is going to come in with flying colors, just that they have many cameras fixed on it and the media is hungry.

If I remember, didn't one of the missions have a cracked window from a flake of paint?

The docking of Discovery has pushed the station a bit higher in orbit.

Space station gets free boost from shuttle
NASA confirms that Discovery’s position helps lift station higher in orbit (http://msnbc.msn.com/id/8814642/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on August 3, 2005, 11:06 PM
The ISS has always relied on the Shuttle for orbit correction.  The Shuttle can use its engines to correct the orbit much better than the ones on the station itself.

I just finished a course for my Master's Degree dealing with Aircraft and Spacecraft design and we spent a lot of time discussing the Shuttle and the ISS.  The Shuttle's engines are truly amazing and they were a huge challenge when they were designing the shuttle.  Not only for the thrust/power requirements, but they are also the first liquid propellent rocket engines that are reusable!

I remember the mission where the paint chip hit the shuttle's window and went about 3/4 inch into it.  It brought the issue of space-junk into light.  I think it happened in the late 80's (maybe early 90's) to Columbia if I recall correctly.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 4, 2005, 09:09 AM
From NASA.gov

The STS-114 and Expedition 11 crews took time out of their schedule to pay tribute to all of the astronauts and cosmonaut who have given their lives for space exploration.

Wearing red shirts with the STS-107 patch, each crewmember provided words of tribute and remembrance in their native languages – English, Russian and Japanese.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124401main_commemorative_event.jpg)

Exploration - The Fire of the Human Spirit
A Tribute – To Fallen Astronauts and Cosmonauts (http://www.nasa.gov/returntoflight/crew/sts114_exp11_tribute.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 4, 2005, 09:38 PM
NASA: No second repair needed (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/08/04/shuttle/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 6, 2005, 01:13 AM
(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/08/05/space.shuttle/story.shuttle.module.return.jpg)

Discovery's Raffaello cargo module is placed back in the playload bay on Friday.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124640main_farewell.jpg)

The International Space Station crew says goodbye to the crew of Discovery before hatch closure. Credit: NASA TV.

The Space Shuttle Discovery crewmembers bid farewell to Expedition 11 aboard the International Space Station today. Now they will undock and head for home.

Hatch closure is scheduled for 12:24 a.m. EDT, with undocking to follow at 3:24. Then the Shuttle will fly around the Station at a distance of 400 feet, allowing the Shuttle crew to photograph the orbiting outpost.

After undocking, Discovery and its seven-member crew will continue to orbit the Earth until early Monday, when they are scheduled to land at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 6, 2005, 03:28 PM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124642main_fd12_undock.jpg)

Space Shuttle Discovery undocks from the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/rids/20050806/i/r2842187086.jpg)

Discovery departed from the International Space Station on August 6, 2005 and glided off on its own in the first step toward the shuttle's risky return to Earth. In this photo, the International Space Station is seen with the earth as the background in this view from the payload bay cameras of space shuttle Discovery, operated by astronaut Soichi Noguchi of Japan, August 6, 2005. NASA TV/Reuters Photo by Nasa Tv/Reuters.

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050806/capt.txdc11708060913.space_shuttle_txdc117.jpg)

A television camera in the payload bay of the space shuttle Discovery, not pictured, shows a possible piece of debris lower left, bright trianglular shape, after the International space station undocked Saturday, Aug. 6, 2005. AP Photo/NASA TV.

(http://us.news3.yimg.com/us.i2.yimg.com/p/ap/20050806/capt.txdc11408060856.space_shuttle_txdc114.jpg)

The glare from the sun is reflected in this televised view of the International space station after the craft undocked from the space shuttle Discovery Saturday, Aug. 6, 2005. AP Photo/NASA TV.

Astronauts take out trash:

By Marcia Dunn

SPACE CENTER, Houston -- The space shuttle made a long overdue trash pickup at the international space station Friday -- the first one in 2-1/2 years.

The Discovery astronauts hoisted a giant garbage can holding 5,000 pounds of broken machines, discarded equipment, empty food cartons and other junk into the shuttle's cargo hold.

It was one of the last chores before the shuttle pulls away from the station after more than a week of linked flight, today.

The two space station occupants were glad to get rid of the stuff since it left them with a much tidier -- and more spacious -- home.

It was the first trash pickup by a shuttle since the end of 2002. The Columbia disaster in early 2003 prevented shuttles from returning to the space station until now, forcing the resident crews to rely on the much smaller and less frequent Russian supply ships for garbage disposal.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 7, 2005, 02:58 AM
This has to be the best picture ever!  :o   8)

Click the pic's for a very large high res photo.

 (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-114/med/iss011e11227.jpg) (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-114/hires/iss011e11227.jpg)

Space Shuttle Discovery approaches the International Space Station. Discovery docked to the Station at 6:18 a.m. (CDT) on Thursday, July 28, 2005 as the two spacecraft orbited over the southern Pacific Ocean west of the South American coast.


 (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-114/med/iss011e11030.jpg) (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-114/hires/iss011e11030.jpg)

Space Shuttle Discovery, as seen from International Space Station (ISS) during rendezvous and docking operations on the morning of July 28,

In this picture, you can just see one of the astronauts in the crew cabin window.

 (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-114/med/iss011e11023.jpg) (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-114/hires/iss011e11023.jpg)

The detail on the pictures are incredible.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 7, 2005, 03:18 AM
Coming up on Friday, August 12th is the Perseid meteor shower, worth a look if your skys are clear.

August Is The Month For Meteors (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005/22jul_perseids2005.htm)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 8, 2005, 02:05 AM
Payload Bay Doors Closed for Landing.

Spacecraft Communicator Ken Ham in Mission Control Houston called Space Shuttle Discovery with an optimistic weather report for landing today. The first landing opportunity is at 4:47 a.m. EDT.

Commander Eileen Collins, Pilot Jim Kelly and the rest of the crew are well into their preparations for landing at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. One important milestone, closing the orbiter's payload bay doors, was executed after the weather report and an official "go" from Mission Control.

If the crew gets the go-ahead from Mission Control for the first landing opportunity, Collins and Pilot Jim Kelly will execute an engine burn that drops Discovery from orbit at 3:40 a.m. EDT. If weather prohibits landing on that orbit, Discovery will have another opportunity about 90 minutes later.

Time to come home, a safe return Discovery and it's crew.  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 8, 2005, 08:24 AM
Discovery landing delayed. New Florida arrival set for 5:07 a.m. ET Tuesday (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/08/08/space.shuttle/index.html)

Due to low clouds at the Kennedy Space Center landing site, Mission Control Houston has waved off both landing opportunities for Space Shuttle Discovery today. STS-114 Commander Eileen Collins and the rest of the crew aboard Space Shuttle Discovery will return the orbiter to normal flight operations for another day. The next opportunity is at 5:07 a.m. EDT Tuesday.

There are several opportunities to land tomorrow, including two at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida and two at Edwards Air Force Base in California.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on August 8, 2005, 10:31 AM
What kind of things do they due when they're stuck in space for another day? I know they fill nearly every second of their schedules with something to do, but what do they do durring plan B-type situations like this?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 8, 2005, 08:55 PM
That's a really good question.

NASA gave them the day off.  ;)

As it stands, they are a go for tomorrows landing at KSC (kennedy Space Center) or if need be, alternative sites were being prepared at Edwards Air Force Base in California and at White Sands in New Mexico.

Landing at KSC would be great as they would not have to ferry the shuttle back from another site.

Discovery is coming down somewhere.  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 9, 2005, 08:53 AM
All right!  8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123424main_landingCap.jpg)

Space Shuttle Discovery lands at Edwards Air Force Base in California. Credit: NASA.

'Discovery is home' (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/08/09/space.shuttle/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on August 9, 2005, 10:58 AM
Heard the sonic boom this morning! It woke me up. :P

If I had worked a little harder, I could have thrown the family in the car and watch it land.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on August 9, 2005, 11:06 AM
I caught a bunch of launches and a few landings when I was going to school at UCF in Orlando.  Truly amazing to see for yourself, tv doesn't do it any justice.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: sfg on August 9, 2005, 11:52 AM
Does anyone (Dale?) know whether when the shuttle approaches the earth for landing, it's under power?  I seem to remember hearing that after it gets deep enough into the earth's atmosphere that the air is thick enough for the wings to catch, it acts purely as a glider, and falls without engine help to the earth.  Someone else I'm talking to (with as little aviation experience as me...none) says that's impossible, and that it has to be powered somehow.  I agree that makes sense and wouldn't be surprised if I'm wrong, but I swear I read that on landing, it's just a glorified glider.

Anyone care to settle the issue?

 ???
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on August 9, 2005, 12:01 PM
sfg, you're right.  The Shuttle does not use any engine power when it's landing.  After it fires it's Orbital Manuevering thrusters to degrade its orbit for reentry, it's basically a glider.


It's really cool when it lands, all you hear are the sonic booms and then nothing.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: JediMAC on August 9, 2005, 12:31 PM
5:08am - Patty and I are sound asleep.

5:09am - BOOM!!!  :o

5:09am - We rocket out of bed, more wide awake and alert than we probably ever have been in our entire lives (especially me).  We run around the house trying to figure out how close the explosion was to us, looking outside both the front and the back.  Nothing.  A minute goes by where we're trying to figure out exactly what in the hell that insane explosion noise was, before it finally dawns on Patty that the Space Shuttle was probably flying into Edwards (45 minutes away), and that it was just a sonic boom.  Turned the TV on, and sure enough, that was exactly the case, as it was still gliding in, and touched down a minute or two later.

Scared the living **** out of us though.  Big time.  Damn.  I'm gonna have to stay more apprised of Shuttle touchdown times, especially when it has to potentially get switched out here, so I don't **** my pants in my sleep again.  :-X

Cool watching it glide in in the dark though.  Glad they made it back home safe and sound.  Hopefully all the added precautions and space walk fix-it jobs shows that our space program can still function quite capably and safely, so they'll lift the temporary grounding edict that was passed last week.  Good stuff.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Diddly on August 9, 2005, 02:08 PM
Does anybody know how they get the shuttle from Edwards back to Kennedy? I don't remember any times when the shuttle landed outside of Kennedy, so I'm curious.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: JediMAC on August 9, 2005, 02:16 PM
I just read on CNN.com this morning that it "piggy-backs" atop a 747 all the way back...  I seem to recall seeing pix like that a long time ago, so that sounds vaguely familiar.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 9, 2005, 07:59 PM
sfg, you're right.  The Shuttle does not use any engine power when it's landing.  After it fires it's Orbital Manuevering thrusters to degrade its orbit for reentry, it's basically a glider.


It's really cool when it lands, all you hear are the sonic booms and then nothing.

Bingo!  ;)

Does anybody know how they get the shuttle from Edwards back to Kennedy? I don't remember any times when the shuttle landed outside of Kennedy, so I'm curious.

I just read on CNN.com this morning that it "piggy-backs" atop a 747 all the way back... I seem to recall seeing pix like that a long time ago, so that sounds vaguely familiar.

Double bingo.  ;)

The shuttle will be loaded on top of the 747 using the Shuttle Mate-Demate Device (MDD) (http://www.nasa.gov/centers/dryden/news/FactSheets/FS-014-DFRC.html)


(http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Photo/STS-MDD/Small/EC91-187-01.jpg)

Once on and ready to go, they ferry the shuttle back to Florida ala Moonraker.  ;)

(http://www.dfrc.nasa.gov/Gallery/Photo/STS-Ferry/Small/EC98-44740-2.jpg)

I was at Edwards Air Force Base on Sept 15th, 1986 and we saw the Mate-Demate Device and the 747 sitting in front of it.

This was my 2nd trip there, I was in Vegas during the Challenger disaster (Jan. 28, 1986). God I remember that day, we were driving out to tour the Hoover Dam and the radio was on and we heard the news. I just sat there not believing what was going on. When we returned to the hotel, my friend was in the room watching TV and said "You better look at this Dale".

What I saw was the rerun of the liftoff and then...  :'(

I knew and I broke down, damn that bottle of tequila went down. One big glass in one shot.

We were in the casino at the Imperial Palace later that day, all the TV's were on then came the speech from Ronald Regan. You could hear a pin drop as all eyes were glued to the TV's.

"We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them, this morning, as they prepared for the journey and waved goodbye and 'slipped the surly bonds of earth to touch the face of God.' "

We drove out to Edwards the next day but as we expected, it was closed. I returned that September with 2 friends and we took the tour, damn glad I did! This was the place where people and machines with the Right Stuff made history.  :)   8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 9, 2005, 08:54 PM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124878main_shuttle_landing-m.jpg)

Touchdown! Discovery makes a picture-perfect landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California at 8:11 a.m. EDT. (Image Credit: Carla Thomas/NASA)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124944main_orbiter-m.jpg)

The sun rises on the Space Shuttle Discovery as it rests on the runway at Edwards Air Force Base, California, after a safe landing August 9, 2005 to complete the STS-114 mission. (Image Credit: Carla Thomas/NASA)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124948main_transport-m.jpg)

NASA's Crew Transport Vehicle, or CTV, pulls up to the Space Shuttle Discovery to offload the crew after a successful landing August 9, 2005 at Edwards Air Force Base, California. The landing marked the end of the STS-114 mission. (Image Credit: Carla Thomas/NASA)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124979main_group-m.jpg)

The crew of mission STS-114 gathered in front of Discovery following landing at Edwards Air Force Base. From left to right: Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson, Commander Eileen Collins, Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, Soichi Noguchi and Charles Camarda, and Pilot James Kelly. (Image Credit: Jim Ross/NASA)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: JediMAC on August 10, 2005, 01:07 AM
I still can't believe they let a chick fly that thing!  :o

 :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 10, 2005, 01:54 AM
I still can't believe they let a chick fly that thing!  :o

 :P

First female shuttle pilot: Eileen Collins was the first female shuttle pilot in 1995. She also piloted a shuttle in 1997. The pilot is the shuttle cockpit second-in-command. Later, Susan Kilrain was pilot for two shuttle missions in 1997, and Pamela Melroy piloted a shuttle in 1998.

First female shuttle commander: Eileen Collins was commander of the shuttle Columbia mission in July 1999. Susan Kilrain and Pamela Melroy are on track to become the second and third female shuttle commanders.

Man-In-Space Firsts: The First Gals (http://www.spacetoday.org/History/ManInSpaceFirsts/FirstGals.html)

Eileen Collins -- First Female Shuttle Commander (http://www.windows.ucar.edu/tour/link=/headline_universe/e_collins.html)

New shuttle commander to take 'one big step for women' (http://www.cnn.com/TECH/space/9803/05/nasa.commander/)

 :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: JediMAC on August 10, 2005, 02:05 AM
First female shuttle pilot: Eileen Collins was the first female shuttle pilot in 1995. She also piloted a shuttle in 1997. The pilot is the shuttle cockpit second-in-command. Later, Susan Kilrain was pilot for two shuttle missions in 1997, and Pamela Melroy piloted a shuttle in 1998.

Damn!  Even worse than I thought!  Those NASA folks must be totally crazy...   :o

 :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scott on August 10, 2005, 02:13 AM
A guy down in Tuscon told me once that seeing the Shuttle aboard the 747 is the coolest thing he had ever seen.  I think they stop in Tucson for refueling or something
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 12, 2005, 01:24 AM
Bumpola!  :)

Coming up on Friday, August 12th is the Perseid meteor shower, worth a look if your skys are clear.

August Is The Month For Meteors (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2005/22jul_perseids2005.htm)

Annual celestial event returns
Perseid meteor shower to peak August 12 (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/08/11/perseid.shower/index.html)

I was just outside a short time ago and it's a little cloudy but I did see a few meteor's. Tomorrow night there forecasting cloudy periods here.  :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on August 13, 2005, 07:07 PM
Also Yesterday, NASA launched the Mars Orbiter.

Hopefully the brainiac engineers at NASA remembered to convert their units of measure this time so it will get to the correct orbit around Mars and not have a ballistic entry into it!  ::)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 28, 2005, 07:15 AM
Interesting stuff from Mars, the mars Rover Sprit is still going and is going and so is it's robot twin Opportunity. Spirit is now sitting atop the summit of Husband Hill.

(http://www.space.com/images/050826_summit_gusav_02.jpg)

Scenery from the summit. Spirit Mars rover is imaging a sweeping vista of martian landscape, including the walls of Gusev crater far off in the distance. Image Credit: NASA/JPL.

(http://www.space.com/images/050826_summit_husband_02.jpg)

From its new vantage point atop Husband Hill, Spirit is surveying the landscape with rover scientists back on Earth plotting the robot’s next sortie. Image Credit: NASA/JPL.

(http://www.space.com/images/050822_rover_view_02.jpg)

Spirit Mars rover has rolled into position for a grand view atop Husband Hill. Note dust devils scooting by across the Gusev crater landscape. A dust devil is much like a tornado on Earth. Credit: NASA/JPL.

NASA also released an animation of dust devils scooting across the Martian surface.  :o   8)

(http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20050819a/dd_enhanced_568b-B558R1.gif)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on August 28, 2005, 12:19 PM
Incredible landscape photo's! It's a amazing that the absence of color makes it all look less alien.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on August 28, 2005, 11:24 PM
Woah, those are some cool shots! I really like that flash animation with the dust devils. :o :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 19, 2005, 11:59 PM
NASA unveils moon program: Apollo on steroids (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/09/19/nasa.moon/index.html)

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/09/19/nasa.moon/story.nasa.moon.return.jpg)  (http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2005/TECH/space/09/19/nasa.moon/story.cev.orbit.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 20, 2005, 12:01 AM
New company wants Mars colony (http://edition.cnn.com/2005/TECH/space/09/19/red.planet.inc.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Tracy on September 20, 2005, 07:06 AM

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124979main_group-m.jpg)

The crew of mission STS-114 gathered in front of Discovery following landing at Edwards Air Force Base. From left to right: Mission Specialist Stephen Robinson, Commander Eileen Collins, Mission Specialists Andrew Thomas, Wendy Lawrence, Soichi Noguchi and Charles Camarda, and Pilot James Kelly. (Image Credit: Jim Ross/NASA)
I still can't believe they let a chick fly that thing! :o

 :P
I can't believe they let Robin Williams on the crew :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on September 20, 2005, 01:55 PM


(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/124979main_group-m.jpg)I can't believe they let Robin Williams on the crew :P

Actually, there seems to be lots of celebs on board.

My crappy photomanip in a rush. . .merely to make a point.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v463/name7574/shuttle.jpg)

From left to right:

Mark Harmon
Jennifer Grey (pre nose job)
some nondescript white astronaught
Ellen Degeneres
some nondescript asian astronaught
Robin Williams
Larry Drake
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth Slothus on September 20, 2005, 02:48 PM
If anyone's interested in attending Edwards' 2 day air show this year here's the link

http://edwards.af.mil/openhouse/

NASA typically has large displays and lots of information here at my bases' air show
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Rob on September 20, 2005, 03:12 PM
Is this the thread where I post pictures of stuff I've found while exploring my office building?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Tracy on September 20, 2005, 04:34 PM
Is this the thread where I post pictures of stuff I've found while exploring my office building?
LOL! :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 23, 2005, 02:04 AM
Comment deleted due to lack or comprehention skills. :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scott on January 28, 2006, 03:07 PM

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2006/TECH/space/01/28/challenger.at.20.ap/story.challenger.crew.sitti.jpg)

Just wanted to pay tribute to the Challenger crew who died 20 years ago today.  For the youngsters, this moment probably is the 2nd most defining moment of my generation (behind 9/11).  The Space Shuttle/NASA etc were HUGE back in the 80's  Gigantically big, I can't even really describe what it was like.  We would watch shuttle launches almost every time one went up.  A few years after Star Wars and with the Star Trek movies going strong and thing like E.T. and The Last Starfighter etc, every kid was enthralled by space and exploration and everything that went along with it.

I was the sickest I have ever been in my entire life the day it happened.  Running a fever of around 104 and I was sick that whole week and got stay home and watch everything over and over again.  There's probably some serious mental problems I have because of that week but it touched me and the whole nation at the time.

Columbia's disaster 3 years ago opened a lot of old wounds and while it wasn't the same totally, there was definitely a lot of sadness etc.  Hopefully we continue to go where no man has gone before, I've said it many times before through the years.  I really hope I'm alive for the day we make Contact, and all of these years of NASA are finally proven a great investment
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 28, 2006, 05:27 PM
Thanks for bumping this up Scott, it's a day I remember very well.  :'(

20 years ago today I was in Las Vegas with friends. We rented a car and were on our way to tour Hover Dam that morning, on the radio I heard there was an accident with Challenger. We checked out the Dam then headed back to Vegas, once in the hotel there was a strange feeling, very quiet.

I went to my room and my roommate who stayed back was watching TV, he said "I think you better watch this". It was a replay of the launch, I watched then my heart just sunk. I just stared at the TV, they kept playing it over and over. There was a bottle of tequila next to the set and I poured a glass and shot it down, then I went out on the the balcony and broke down. After awhile I went to the lobby, TV's were on and Regan was addressing the nation.

The next day, my friend and I drove to to Edwards Air Force Base for a tour but sadly the base was close. This was I trip I planned long before and I was very happy to return that year in September.  :)

(http://www.challenger.org/about/images/mission_patch.jpg)

"We will never forget them, nor the last time we saw them, this morning, as they prepared for their journey and waved good-bye and "slipped the surly bonds of earth" to "touch the face of God."

24 names (http://www.amfcse.org/Those%20Honored.htm) of those who died in the space programs of the United States are remembered at the Space Mirror Memorial (http://www.amfcse.org/space_mirror_memorial.htm) at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on January 28, 2006, 10:01 PM
I also remember this day.  I was coming home from a half-day of mid term exams in 9th grade.  I walked in the door and my brother told me the shuttle had blown up.  I didn't believe him at first, but then they showed the first replay.  I sat in front of the television completely stunned for the rest of the evening.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth Slothus on January 28, 2006, 11:41 PM
I remember too, I was a sophmore getting home from school and saw it on TV, talk about a sinking feeling :(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: exjedi on January 29, 2006, 12:48 AM
Man, I must be getting old when 20 years doesn't seem like that long ago.

We watched that launch for science class that day.  We had been working on jet propulsion for a few weeks, building those little balsa and paper rockets that shoot way the hell up in the sky.  My rocket was a mini version of the shuttle & I still have the thing somewhere stashed away.  I felt the need to hang onto it as a reminder of that day...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 29, 2006, 04:57 PM
Does anyone have the National Geographic Channel? They aired Challenger: The Untold Story (http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/channel/ET/daily/20060128.html) last night and it reaires again this Monday & Tuesday. I do not get this up in Canada. If anyone can record me a copy of it, I would be most grateful.  :)

Quote
Saturday, January 28, 2006, at 11P

Challenger: The Untold Story
Challenger: The Untold Story []
The January 28, 1986, launch of the space shuttle Challenger was expected to be a historic first-schoolteacher Christa McAuliffe was to be the first private ordinary U.S. citizen flown into space. Instead, the Challenger flight marked one of the greatesttragedies in American space exploration when the shuttle exploded 73 seconds after liftoff, killing all seven crew members on board. With the shuttleÂ’s explosion came serious questions such as could the tragedy have been averted?


Also airs:
Monday, January 30, 12P
Tuesday, January 31, 4:00A
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on January 30, 2006, 12:31 PM
People talk about remebering where they were when they heard the news of the Kennedy Assassination, I will always remember where I was when the Challenger Tragedy was announced. 10th grade English class.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: stormie on January 30, 2006, 01:09 PM
For me, it was 11th grade chemistry with Mr. Hilstrom. It's just amazing the things one can remember when a traumatic event burns it into your mind. I think my initial reaction was that it was a joke, especially since the guy relaying the news to our bench was usually more interested in toking than talking.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: CorranHorn on January 30, 2006, 11:47 PM
This is indeed one of those events where I will always remember where I was at when it happened. I was in the 3rd grade and we were on one of those bathroom breaks where the teacher had to escort all the students into the hallway by the bathrooms so we could go potty. While we were out there, the 4th grade class taught by Ms. King watched the Challenger's launch. After the accident Ms. King rushed out of her classroom crying hysterically about the explosion and the death of the 7 astronauts. I would later come to find out that Ms. King had been a friend of Christa McAuliffe at some point in their lives. Every year at this time I recall that memory and I more and more realize how it shook me. The profound sadness in the face of a teacher while confronting a group of 7-8 year olds on what at that time would be the biggest disaster in their lives.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on January 31, 2006, 10:08 AM
Wow CorranHorn. That story even touched me.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth Kenobi on January 31, 2006, 12:06 PM
I remember being at recess (I think, I was in the first grade so I forgot some of the details) when the shuttle blew up.  We came into our class and my teacher was listening to it on the radio.  She let as listen to the radio until school was over.  I hadn't seen he video for a while since my school was about 30 miles from my house and I didn't get home till about 4:30 so I was hoping it was possible that somehow the people aboard could survive.  After I saw the video through I figure no one survive.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 1, 2006, 08:52 PM
From my first post of the thread:

It is with deep regret that I inform you on this.

http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/space/02/01/shuttle.columbia/index.html

My heart & payers go out with the famliy's & NASA.  :(  :'(

Please take a moment to remember Columbia and her crew, with this very moving tribute video.  :)

 STS-107 Tribute (http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/docs/COLUMBIA_NTSC.wmv)

Hail Columbia (http://www.nasaspaceflight.com/content/?id=4273)

(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/Darth%20Vader/In%20Memory%20of%20STS107.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 1, 2006, 08:25 PM
I was just checking out the news and wow!  :o  8)

The Hubble Space Telescope has captured the most detailed image ever taken of a spiral galaxy.

Astronomers stitched together 51 separate images from Hubble -- with a few other details from ground-based instruments -- to build this mosaic of Messier 101, also known as the Pinwheel Galaxy.

At an impressive 16,000 by 12,000 pixels, the image is the largest and most detailed ever caught of a spiral galaxy.

The Pinwheel Galaxy is about 170,000 light-years wide, almost twice the diameter of our own Milky Way, and is estimated to contain at least one trillion stars.

Astronomers believe that perhaps 100 billion of those stars may be similar to our sun, and millions of individual objects can be picked from this image.

The galaxy itself sits about 25 million light-years away toward the northern constellation Ursa Major.

The light that reached Earth to build this portrait left the Pinwheel Galaxy during our planet's Miocene Period, when the first mastodon appeared and mammals were flourishing.

Clicky the pic for a detailed look at this impressive Galaxy.

My God, it's full of stars! (http://www.uselessmoviequotes.com/files/stars.wav)

(http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/2006/10/images/a/formats/small_web.jpg) (http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/2006/10/images/a/formats/xlarge_web.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Famine on March 1, 2006, 08:32 PM
 :o Breathtaking!

Kevin
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth Slothus on March 1, 2006, 09:50 PM
5 out of 10 :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 1, 2006, 09:59 PM
This link has some great pics, very high res when you click on some of the pics. Check out the Eagle Nebula from February 26.  :o  10 out of 10.  :P

Astronomy Picture of the Day Archive (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on March 1, 2006, 11:57 PM
Amazing. Just seeing all of the other galaxies in that picture alone is mind blowing.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jeff on March 9, 2006, 04:08 PM
Liquid water on Saturn moon could support life (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/11736311/)

wow, some interesting stuff in there.  Granted, it's not like it's a quick trip to the moons of Saturn, but really cool whenever they find water on another planet/moon.

It's a tiny little bugger of a moon too..

(http://msnbcmedia.msn.com/i/msnbc/Components/Interactives/Technology_Science/Space/Enceladus_size.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: CorranHorn on March 10, 2006, 12:32 AM
That's pretty amazing, all the elements are in place on Enceladus to form life as we know it. And we have the means to prove if that is the case, hopefully more details will come forward in the coming years that will enlighten us further.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on March 10, 2006, 01:39 AM
I just saw something on the news about this. I love how our own solar system still has so many mysteries.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 29, 2006, 11:29 PM
A big event today with the solar eclipse. I did some searching for a video & I came across this site with an archived webcast.

Total Solar Eclipse Live From Turkey (http://www.exploratorium.edu/eclipse/2006/index.html)

Click on ethier the Windows Media stream or Realmedia stream on the right side of the page. Once loaded zip past a lot of blah... blah... blah & play at about 54 minutes into it. At approx 54 minutes & 50 seconds this just blew my mind!  :o 

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2006/TECH/03/29/solar.eclipse.ap/story.total.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 9, 2006, 11:24 PM
Nice hi res pictures coming through from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.  8)

Pics can be seen here: Calibration (http://marsprogram.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/gallery/calibration/index.html)

NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, launched August 12, 2005, is on a search for evidence that water persisted on the surface of Mars for a long period of time. While other Mars missions have shown that water flowed across the surface in Mars' history, it remains a mystery whether water was ever around long enough to provide a habitat for life.

A Mission to Study the History of Water on Mars  (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/MRO/mission/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/122130main_MRO_image-330.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on April 10, 2006, 09:54 AM
I caught some of the Cassini mission to Titian on Nova last week. As we were watching, my wife kept saying, the incidental music sounds familiar. It was music from Raiders.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 12, 2006, 08:37 PM
45 years ago today: Space station crew marks Gagarin's flight (http://edition.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/04/12/gagarin.anniversary.ap/index.html)

(http://www.centennialofflight.gov/essay/SPACEFLIGHT/people/SP48G1.jpg)

25 years ago today: STS-1: 'A test pilot's dream' (http://edition.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/04/12/shuttle.anniversary/index.html)

(http://www.spacefacts.de/mission/photo/sts-1.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on May 18, 2006, 04:25 PM
Three new planets discovered 41 LY's away. (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/05/18/extrasolar.planets/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 17, 2006, 04:09 PM
NASA Gives Green Light for Discovery's Launch!
 (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

NASA sets shuttle launch for July 1 (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/06/17/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/122541main_STS121-S-002_516.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/122517main_STS121-S-002.jpg)

From the left are astronauts Stephanie D. Wilson, Michael E. Fossum, both mission specialists; Steven W. Lindsey, commander; Piers J. Sellers, mission specialist; Mark E. Kelly, pilot; European Space Agency (ESA) astronaut Thomas Reiter of Germany; and Lisa M. Nowak, both mission specialists.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 30, 2006, 06:45 PM
Big day for NASA tomorrow afternoon,  July 1, 2006 at 3:49 p.m. EDT.

Hope this all go well for NASA, Discovery & her crew.  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on June 30, 2006, 07:59 PM
I had been reading that there is some internal Nasa debate about how well the foam problem was corrected. I find it inspiring that despite any debate, all the Astronauts said it's worth the risk.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 30, 2006, 08:43 PM
Dear Lord, please don't let me **** up.
I didn't quite copy that. Say again, please.
I said everything's A-OK.  [The Right Stuff]

Yeah, been reading a bit following up the the launch.

NASA safety chief won't appeal shuttle launch (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/06/21/space.shuttle.reut.reut/index.html)

NASA prepares for July 1 liftoff (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/06/26/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

Stakes are high for shuttle program (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/06/26/space.shuttle.stakes.reut/index.html)

Shuttle crew faces 1-in-100 chance of dying (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/06/27/shuttle.risk.ap/index.html)

Could be the end of the shuttle program if things go wrong & the crew have to board the space station for a rescue. Until they can get the Atlantis up there they might have to stay that max of 30 days. Atlantis is also at risk to any damage.  :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 1, 2006, 05:47 PM
Launch of the shuttle was delayed do to the weather, another attempt tomorrow at 3:26 p.m. ET.

Weather delays shuttle launch (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/07/01/shuttle.launch/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 1, 2006, 10:42 PM
Caught the delay today. :(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 2, 2006, 04:22 PM
July 4th they will try again.

Weather forces NASA to scrub shuttle launch (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/07/02/shuttle.launch/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on July 2, 2006, 07:56 PM
It's been kind of interesting for me lately because the class I'm currently taking for my Master's Degree is taught by a guy that works at NASA as a project manager for the life support systems on the ISS.  He's been giving us a lot of first-hand experience with the shuttle launch.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 3, 2006, 04:49 PM
Hey that's cool Matt.  8)

Foam issues again.  :-\

Shuttle Team Working Foam Issue
 (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/151522main_Foam-3-m.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/151519main_BestImage3.JPG)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 3, 2006, 08:00 PM
Large asteroid zips past Earth (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/07/03/asteroid.encounter.ap/index.html)

This is cool, from the Astronomy Picture of the Day Archive (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/archivepix.html).  8)

(http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0606/movingmoons_cassini.gif)

Explanation: The moons of Saturn never stop. A space traveler orbiting the ringed giant planet would witness a continuing silent dance where Saturn's multiple moons pass near each other in numerous combinations. Like a miniature Solar System, the innermost moons orbit Saturn the fastest. The above movie was centered on Saturn's moon Rhea, so that the moons Mimas and Enceladus appear to glide by. At 1,500 kilometers across, Rhea is over three times larger than the comparably sized Mimas and Enceladus. The Sun illuminates the scene from the lower right, giving all of the moons the same crescent phase. The above time lapse movie was created by the Saturn-orbiting robotic Cassini spacecraft over a period of about 40 minutes.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 3, 2006, 08:56 PM
Thanks for posting that movie! I love that stuff. For kicks and giggles, can you find post that movie of the Earth rotating? It's truly awesome.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 3, 2006, 09:33 PM
A few out but mostly animated.

Rotating Earth (http://www.solarviews.com/raw/earth/vearth3.mpg)

(http://anthony.grellier.free.fr/povray/PhotoEarth.gif)

(http://www.planetcup.com/images/rotating_earth.gif)

This one is in 3D, pretty neat.

Earth 3D (http://ccastel.free.fr/)

Great site too on our spaceship.

Earth Images Collection (http://homepages.ge.ucl.ac.uk/~awayne/EICD/earthimg.htm)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2006, 01:52 AM
So much for the foam issue, Discovery is a go!  8)

From the nasa.gov site

Quote
Discovery's a "Go" for Independence Day

After analysis of available data, the Mission Management Team has given a "go" for Tuesday's launch of Space Shuttle Discovery to the International Space Station.

During a routine inspection Sunday night after the draining of the external fuel tank, a crack was discovered in the foam near a bracket that holds the liquid oxygen feedline in place. It is believed that the rain experienced during Sunday's launch attempt caused water to run down the feedline and form ice near the top of the strut next to the feedline bracket. As the tank warmed and expanded, the ice that formed most likely pinched the foam on the top of the strut, causing a crack and eventual loss of the small piece of foam. The Mission Management Team met Monday at 6:30 p.m. EDT to discuss the results of the information before making a final decision regarding Tuesday's launch attempt.

Extensive analysis showed that the area around the crack is intact and there is no concern for heating as there is adequate foam in place on the strut. Additional borescope inspection of the tank revealed that the bracket has no cracks.

Currently, there is a 60 percent chance of favorable launch weather for Tuesday and a 40 percent chance of favorable weather for Wednesday according to Air Force First Lt. Kaleb Nordgren of the 45th Weather Squadron. If the weather cooperates this will be the first Independence Day launch of a space shuttle!

Live Coverage
NASA TV coverage of the launch and live countdown updates from NASA's Launch Blog will begin on Tuesday, July 4, at 8:30 a.m. EDT.

Watch NASA TV  (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

NASA's Launch Blog - Mission STS-121 (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/launch/sts-121/launch-vlcc.html)

Live NASA TV Video & Countdown Clock (http://countdown.ksc.nasa.gov/shuttle/countdown/cdt/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2006, 02:36 PM
T-minus 1 minute & counting.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2006, 02:38 PM
Waaaaaaaaaaaahhhhhhhhoooooooooooooooooooo!

Go baby go!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2006, 02:41 PM
Solid rocket booster separation complete, looking good.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2006, 02:48 PM
Main engine cut off, external tank separation complete. Holy ****, that was awesome! What a view.  :o
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2006, 02:52 PM
Discovery is on it's way to the International Space Station, 3rd time the charm. Everything looks great, congtrats to NASA & the crew of Discovery.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/151567main_launch.jpg)

Image above: Discovery liftoffs from Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Photo credit: NASA

Happy 4th of July!  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on July 4, 2006, 04:23 PM
Discovery is on it's way to the International Space Station, 3rd time the charm. Everything looks great, congtrats to NASA & the crew of Discovery.


That's great news! I'm glad everything went well for them this go around. I'm sure that engine was quite the fourth of July fireworks show for everyone down around the Cape. :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 4, 2006, 04:36 PM
Independence Day liftoff for Discovery (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/07/04/shuttle.launch/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/151585main_image_feature_605_ys_3.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/151587main_image_feature_605_ys_full.jpg)  

Like a roman candle shooting through the blue sky, the launch of Space Shuttle Discovery on mission STS-121 kicks off the fireworks for the U.S. holiday.

Commanded by Steven Lindsey, Discovery and its crew of seven astronauts roared from Launch Pad 39B to begin a 15,000-mph chase to rendezvous with the International Space Station. Image credit: NASA

(http://www.space.com/images/060704_sts121_launch_02.jpg)

The Space Shuttle Discovery lifts off at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on mission STS-121 Tuesday, July 4, 2006. It was the third attempt at a launch since Saturday. Credit: AP Photo

(http://www.space.com/images/060704_etsep_02.jpg)

These views taking by a video camera mounted to the external tank of space shuttle Discovery shows the orbiter both attached and pulling free from the 15-story vessel. Credit: NASA/KSC
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 4, 2006, 06:43 PM
My wife and I watched the launch. Couldn't ask for a more perfect day.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 5, 2006, 09:13 PM
Don't have cable or satellite, so while I'm visiting family on the East coast, I'm getting to take in some of the cooler programming that i'm missing. Was surprised to see there was a Nasa channel and tuned in a few times just to watch footage of the shuttle sitting in space.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on July 5, 2006, 10:51 PM
I kind of chuckled that the scientists of NASA are now studying some bird **** that was on the shuttle during take-off and made it to orbit.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 5, 2006, 11:00 PM
Bird **** is important, at a very high speed, that **** will stick forever & will never burn off!  :D  ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 6, 2006, 11:56 PM
Discovery docks with space station (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/07/06/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060706_shuttle_pitch_02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery performs an orbital back flip to allow ISS astronauts to photograph its tile-lined underbelly during the July 6, 2006 docking of NASA's STS-121 mission astronauts. Credit: NASA TV. Click to enlarge. (space.com)

(http://www.space.com/images/060706_sts121_foamsize_02.jpg)

Image analysts have pinned down the area of a foam loss site on Discovery's external tank during its STS-121 launch on July 4, 2006. It is 12.3 by 14.2 inches in area, and about 0.5-to one inch thick. The foam sheet came off in several pieces well after the time it could have damaged Discovery, NASA said. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060705_ext_tank_02.jpg)

The highlighted area indicates the former location of a protective foam ramp on Discovery's External Tank-119. With the ramp removed, a series of ice frost ramps were exposed, but appear to have performed as expected. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060706_sts121_gapfiller2_02.jpg)

Analysts have identified a second gap filler protruding from the heat tiles along Discovery's belly after its STS-121 launch on July 4, 2006. The gap filler is located in the aft, near the body flap. Credit: NASA
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 8, 2006, 12:34 AM
(http://www.space.com/images/060607_sts121_leonardo_02.jpg)

Discovery's STS-121 astronauts delivered the Leonardo cargo module to the ISS on July 7, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060707_discovery_belly_02.jpg)

Though very close to the International Space Station, the majority of Discovery's underside is visible in this frame. The image was captured by one of the Expedition 13 crewmembers onboard the International Space Station during the RPM survey prior to docking of the two spacecraft on July 6, 2006. Credit: NASA/JSC.

(http://www.space.com/images/060707_sts121_areas_02.jpg)

Areas of interest under study by the image analysis and thermal protection system team at NASA’s Johnson Space Center during STS-121 on July 6, 2006. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060707_sts121_fd4_rcc_02.jpg)

A cross section of the Discovery wing leading edge images studied after a July 7, 2006 inspection. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060707_sts121_gapfill_02.jpg)

The two gap fillers studied during a July 7, 2006 inspection by the STS-121 crew. Credit: NASA.

From nasa.gov (http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/sts-121_front/index.html)

7 p.m. CDT, Friday, July 7, 2006. Mission Control Center, Houston, Texas.

STATUS REPORT: STS-121-07:

 The STS-121 Mission Management Team Friday decided to extend Discovery’s flight by an additional day to 13 days after reviewing the rate at which the orbiter’s consumables are being used. The extra day will allow a third spacewalk to test thermal protection system repair techniques and evaluate a thermal imaging camera.

With the mission extension, landing is now planned at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Monday, July 17 at 8:12 a.m. CDT.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: CorranHorn on July 8, 2006, 12:52 AM
Great job on the updates Dale. Glad to see everything is going well and hopefully this will bring renewed vigor for the space program.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 9, 2006, 03:11 AM
Thanks Jason, yeah NASA needs this boost. Just a few short years left in the shuttle program then the moon or Mars or other.  :-\

Great stuff coming from the station, a busy day they had.

(http://www.space.com/images/060708_sts121_eva1beg_02.jpg)

STS-121 mission specialist Piers Sellers exits the International Space Station (ISS) during the first of three spacewalks planned for his mission aboard Discovery. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060708_sts121_eva1bay_02.jpg)

STS-121 spacewalker Piers Sellers (right) attaches tethers to the shuttle Discovery's robotic arm during the first EVA of the mission. Spacewalking partner Michael Fossum secures tools for the orbital work at left. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060708_sts121_eva1boom_02.jpg)

STS-121 spacewalkers Michael Fossum (left) is perched at the end of Discovery's inspection boom with Piers Sellers tethered to a nearby tool carrier. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060708_sts121_eva1end_02.jpg)

NASA astronauts Piers Sellers (in striped spacesuit on right) and Michael Fossum head back to the ISS after completing their goals for their STS-121 mission's first spacewalk on July 8, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060708_sts121_srbsep_02.jpg)

This still image is taken from video recorded by one of four new cameras mounted to the solid rocket boosters for NASA's space shuttle Discovery during its July 4, 2006 launch of the STS-121 mission. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060708_sts121_evabm_02.jpg)

STS-121 spacewalkers Piers Sellers and Michael Fossum test Discovery's orbital boom for stability as a repair work platform during their mission's first spacewalk on July 8, 2006. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060708_sts121_wab_02.jpg)

In this image taken by an airborne WB-57 jet, clouds of rocket exhaust can be seen billowing ahead of Discovery as its solid rocket boosters separate from the external tank on July 4, 2006. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060708_sts121_badgapfill_02.jpg)

A up-close look at the one gap filler that analysts continue to study before clearing Discovery's heat shield for reentry on July 8, 2006. Credit: NASA/JSC.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 9, 2006, 10:20 PM
Great news.  :)

NASA clears space shuttle for return to Earth (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/07/09/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060709_sts121_predock_02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery approaches the International Space Station for docking but before the link-up occurred, the orbiter "posed" for a thorough series of inspection photos. Discovery docked at the station's Pressurized Mating Adapter 2 at 10:52 a.m. EDT, July 6, 2006. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060708_sts121_badgapfill_02.jpg)

An up-close look at a gap filler that analysts studied before clearing Discovery's heat shield for reentry on July 9, 2006. Credit: NASA/JSC
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on July 10, 2006, 12:28 AM
Discovery was going to come back to Earth anyway....the announcement was that the crew will be aboard as well.   ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on July 10, 2006, 12:34 AM
The photography of the past two missions really has been spectacular.  I got a chance to watch some of the spacewalk live on Friday and it's amazing to watch.  The astronauts have helmet mounted cameras that NASA was switching onto their channel live.  In fact, if you have Direct TV you can actually watch a lot of the Shuttle mission video live.  It's on channel 376.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 10, 2006, 01:10 AM
Oh yes, awesome pictures & videos. I have been following the online NASA feed.  :)

I found these on a space forum, these are so ******* cool.  8)

Tracking ISS /STS-121 Discovery (http://www.satscape.co.uk/)

GoogleSatTrack 2 - STS-121 Special Edition (http://www.lizard-tail.com/isana/lab/googlesat/googlesat2.php)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on July 10, 2006, 08:47 AM


GoogleSatTrack 2 - STS-121 Special Edition (http://www.lizard-tail.com/isana/lab/googlesat/googlesat2.php)

That is the balls.

I had no idea how fast the shuttle traveled.  I've been watching it for the past 20 minutes or so while doing other stuff (yeah right) and in that time it's zipped from somewhere in the western Ukraine to over Papau New Guinnea now.  When it hit the NW corner of China I decided to send a link to some friends, and in the time it took me to write and address the email it was already zooming into Hong Kong!!!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth Slothus on July 10, 2006, 11:06 AM
I hear from somewhere (can't remember) the shuttel IS landing for sure at Edwards this time. Awesome, 2 landings inside of a year= great. If it really is true then this time I'll have to go outside and see the landing instead of being 'woke-up' by it like a lot of the SC :P.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on July 10, 2006, 12:33 PM


GoogleSatTrack 2 - STS-121 Special Edition (http://www.lizard-tail.com/isana/lab/googlesat/googlesat2.php)

That is the balls.

I had no idea how fast the shuttle traveled. 

It really is amazing how fast the thing moves.  It clocks in at around 17,000 miles an hour.  At that speed it takes roughly 90 minutes for the shuttle to complete a full orbit.  And since they're docked with the space station they're in an even higher orbit than normal.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth Slothus on July 10, 2006, 01:12 PM
I remember years ago when I was living in Texas working for the Gov't, our boss told us the space shuttle was entering the atmoshpere in route to Florida for a landing. It was early, probably between 2-5 AM sometime and it was a clear night with no moon and plenty of stars. We watched it enter the atmosphere. Wow! it looked liked a comet! I thought about going inside to wake up my wife and kids to see it but decided I would miss it myself because it went so freaking fast across the horizon. It went from one horizon to the other Fast! 8) :o
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on July 10, 2006, 08:55 PM


GoogleSatTrack 2 - STS-121 Special Edition (http://www.lizard-tail.com/isana/lab/googlesat/googlesat2.php)

That is the balls.

I had no idea how fast the shuttle traveled.  I've been watching it for the past 20 minutes or so while doing other stuff (yeah right) and in that time it's zipped from somewhere in the western Ukraine to over Papau New Guinnea now.  When it hit the NW corner of China I decided to send a link to some friends, and in the time it took me to write and address the email it was already zooming into Hong Kong!!!

I've been watching the shuttle on and off all day.  As I watched it come into the States just now, I called my son (5) and his neighbor friend (4) in from the yard to explain what it was and where it was. They were fascinated, and when it got into Ohio, I pointed out that it was about to pass over Tennessee.  Both boys ran back out into the front yard and looked up at the sky waving and screaming "helloooooooo spacemeeennnnnnn!!!!!"
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 12, 2006, 12:29 AM
Ha, that's great Richard.  8)

I showed a few people at work that link & you should hear them... but it was just over there a minute ago!  ;D

Time to play catch me up on the last few days.

(http://www.space.com/images/060710_sts121_tus_eva2_02.jpg)

STS-121 spacewalker Michael Fossum totes a new Trailing Umbilical System (TUS) at the end of the ISS robotic arm during a July 10, 2006 spacewalk to replace a faulty station cable reel. The dark cavity seen in the ISS truss above Fossum is where he installed the new unit. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060710_sts121_pmp_eva2_02.jpg)

STS-121 spacewalkers Piers Sellers (left in striped spacesuit) and Michael Fossum installed a pump module on a spare parts platform outside the ISS on July 10, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

Astronaut to NASA: Can't fix it, duct it? (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/07/11/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

Ha, duct tape. That brings back memories of Apollo 13 when the NASA engineers came up with a makeshift canister for the CO2 level & Apollo 17 when they had to repair the flap on one of the rover's fenders.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 12, 2006, 09:36 PM
Astronauts spackle in space: Oops! Spatula floats away from spacewalker  (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/07/12/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060712_sts121_eva3_bay2_02.jpg)

Shuttle astronaut Piers Sellers (left) records heat shield repair tests from his perch on the ISS robotic arm during a July 12, 2006 spacewalk in the Discovery shuttle's payload bay. At right, spacewalker Michael Fossum shades the samples for the infrared camera video session. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060712_sts121_eva3_fos_02.jpg)

This view, seen from cameras mounted to the helmet of STS-121 spacewalker Michael Fossum, show the astronaut as he adds NOAX repair substance to an intentionally damaged sample of reinforced carbon carbon heat shield material. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.newscientistspace.com/data/images/ns/cms/dn9539/dn9539-4_650.jpg)

This panel has been smeared with NOAX, a sealant that resembles grey peanut butter. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 13, 2006, 11:28 PM
I got o hit the Smithsonian Air and Space museum today. What a rush. Nothing like seeing the real things; two of the Mercury capsules and Apollo 11.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Tracy on July 14, 2006, 06:48 AM
One of my favorite memories of living in DC was seeing Jim Lovell at the Air & Space Museum.  He gave an amazing lecture about the Apollo 13 mission complete with photographs and video taken by the crew.   
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 14, 2006, 11:01 PM
Wow, that must have been a great lecture Tracy.  8)

I would love to check out the Air & Space Museum, been thinking about it for years... someday.  :)

Latest updates:

(http://www.space.com/images/060714_sts121_docked_02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery as it appears docked at the International Space Station (ISS) during NASA's STS-121 mission in July 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060714_leo_mod_02.jpg)

The International Space Station transfered the Leonardo module to the Discovery shuttle's cargo bay today, July 14, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060713_sts121_group_02.jpg)

The STS-121 crewmembers gather for an in-flight crew photo in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. From the left (bottom) are astronauts Stephanie D. Wilson, mission specialist; Steven W. Lindsey, commander; and Lisa M. Nowak, mission specialist. From the left (top) are astronauts Piers J. Sellers, Michael E. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060714_iss_arm_02.jpg)

Glitches with the robotic arm aboard the International Space Station delayed micrometeorite impact inspections of Discovery's port wing on July 14, 2006. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060714_apu_diagram_02.jpg)

This diagram depicts Discovery's auxiliary power unit (APU) system, with two areas currently under study highlighted. Credit: NASA.

HOUSTON – NASA officials are confident that a potential fuel leak in a power unit aboard the space shuttle Discovery, if unchanged, will not hinder the spacecraft’s Monday landing, a top mission manager said Friday.

John Shannon, NASA’s deputy shuttle program manager, said that in worst case scenario – in which fuel is leaking and not harmless nitrogen, something that is not yet certain – one of Discovery’s three auxiliary power units (APUs) may be leaking a total of about six drops an hour, or about 100,000 times below the fire hazard limit.

In other space news:

(http://english.people.com.cn/200607/06/images/xinsrc_20207030610185001083867.jpg)

HOUSTON – A trio of astronauts and one entrepreneur are counting the days remaining before they rocket towards the International Space Station (ISS).

The three-astronaut crew of ISS Expedition 14 and Japanese businessman Daisuke Enomoto are set to launch toward the space station in the upcoming months, some riding a Russian Soyuz into orbit in September while one NASA spaceflyer waits for a December shuttle launch.

And for thre record books:

(http://www.space.com/images/v_skydive_spacecraft_02.jpg)

Fournier pictured with the small pressurised spacecraft that will protect him against UV rays and the tremendous cold. Totally controlled from earth, it contains the necessary oxygen, instruments of measurement and control, as well as flight data recording instruments including sound and image recording. Image Credit: Big Jump.

Frenchman Michel Fournier is readying himself and equipment to attempt a record-setting free fall from the stratosphere.

Dubbed "The Big Jump", Fournier is eyeing next month for his supersonic free fall from about 130,000 feet (40 kilometers)—roughly 25 miles above the Earth. The dive from a balloon-carried gondola is slated to take place above the plains of Saskatchewan, Canada.

The Jump equipment is principally composed of a huge Russian-supplied stratospheric balloon and the specially crafted gondola. To ascend to jump height will take some 3 hours. The gondola shelters Fournier during ascent. It also is loaded with flight instruments: navigation equipment, oxygen bottles, radio gear, video recorders and Global Positioning System (GPS) satellite tracking device.

If successful, Fournier will beat four world parachutist’s records from the border of space:

Altitude record for freefall.
Altitude record for human balloon flight.
Time record for longest freefall.
Speed record for fastest freefall—breaking the sound barrier in the process.

Now that freefall would be something to see!  :o  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 15, 2006, 09:12 PM
(http://www.space.com/images/060715_sts121_iss_undck_02.jpg)

A video camera aboard the space shuttle Discovery shows the International Space Station hovering above a blue Earth after the orbiter undocked from the orbital lab on July 15, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152392main_s121e07577.jpg)

Image above: View of the International Space Station from the Space Shuttle Discovery after undocking. Photo Credit: NASA

Discovery remains on track for a scheduled touch down at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., at 9:14 a.m. Monday.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 16, 2006, 07:35 PM
From Nasa.gov

Discovery Cleared for Landing; First Attempt Monday

The Mission Control Center told the STS-121 crew Sunday morning that engineers have cleared Space Shuttle Discovery for landing after completing a review of post-docking inspection data.

The crew members received the word while eating lunch. They prepared Sunday for landing by stowing items, testing engines and checking out shuttle systems.

The astronauts took a break from their work to talk to reporters with CNN, CBS, ABC, NBC and the Fox News Channel.

Landing is set for 9:14 a.m. EDT Monday at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla. The crew is scheduled to fire the shuttle’s engines at 8:07 a.m. to begin Discovery’s descent to Florida.

A second landing opportunity in Florida also is available for Monday. The crew would fire the engines at 9:43 a.m. for a landing at 10:50 a.m. Weather forecasts call for a chance of showers at the landing site. Flight controllers do not plan to consider any landing site other than Florida on Monday.

Discovery delivered supplies, equipment and a new Expedition 13 crew member to the International Space Station. During three spacewalks, the crew performed maintenance on the station’s mobile transporter and tested orbiter heat shield repair techniques.

I won't be able to see the landing till I get home & check online. If nothing delays the landing, Godspeed to Discovery & her crew.  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 17, 2006, 05:17 PM
Discovery & her crew are back.  8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152478main_06pd1571-lt.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152482main_06pd1571-l.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152496main_06pd1564-s.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152501main_06pd1564-l.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152516main_20060717_sts121_08-s.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152517main_20060717_sts121_08-1.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152503main_06pd1569-s.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152507main_06pd1569-l.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152533main_crew_at_slf.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/152534main_06pd1587.jpg)

Atlantis orbiter is slated to launch one of the most complicated ISS construction missions in just six week’s time.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on July 17, 2006, 06:41 PM
I watched the landing this morning....picture perfect.

I hope they do step up Shuttle launches since, as far as the ISS goes, they have an ambitious mission and a relatively short timetable to complete it (four years).

I doubt the replacement for the Shuttle will have the same payload capacity.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on July 18, 2006, 08:05 PM
I was so out of contact with civilization on Monday that by the time I got to the news, the landing wasn't even being reported anymore. Glad I can rely on DSJ. ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 18, 2006, 11:10 PM
Your more than Welcome.  :)

You can view the mission at the Video Gallery at the Nasa.gov site.   :)

Video features (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/videogallery/index.html)

From Space.com

Virgin Galactic Aims to Fly Passengers by 2008 (http://space.com/news/ap_060718_virgin_update.html)

Untill more space reports, enjoy the view.  ;)

(http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0607/shuttlego_nasa.gif)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 24, 2006, 11:35 PM
Psssssssssssssst! Ya got $35 million to spare?

Spacewalks for sale
Space tourists offered 'holy grail of spaceflight' (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/07/24/spacewalk.for.sale.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 9, 2006, 12:09 AM
The space shuttle Atlantis & her crew are gearing up for a launch currently targeted for August 27.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/154241main_tcdt1748_s.jpg)

After their arrival at Kennedy Space Center's Shuttle Landing Facility, the STS-115 crew poses for a photo after talking to the media. From left are Mission Specialists Daniel Burbank, Steven MacLeanwho represents the Canadian Space Agency, Joseph Tanner and Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper; Commander Brent Jett; and Pilot Christopher Ferguson.
Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton.

During their 11 days in space, the astronauts will install the integrated P3/P4 truss segment with its two large solar arrays that will provide one-fourth of the total power generation capability of the completed station.

Dang! 1 day before my move so I might out of the loop during this mission.  :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 16, 2006, 11:29 PM
Space Shuttle Atlantis a go for launch on Aug. 27th.  8)

NASA sets shuttle Atlantis launch date (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/08/16/space.shuttle.reut/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Tracy on August 17, 2006, 07:02 AM

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/154241main_tcdt1748_s.jpg)


Wait, NASA's going to let Officer Travis Junior fly the Shuttle?  :o
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on August 17, 2006, 10:18 AM
CNN is reporting that the international Astronomers community might upgrade the solar system to 12 planets. Pluto would stay, but it's moon Cheron would be added as well as Xena which is larger (and further) than Pluto. The largest Asteroid, Ceres, would also re-gain it's planet status (it was considered a planet in the 1800's.)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Mikey D on August 17, 2006, 10:35 AM
CNN is reporting that the international Astronomers community might upgrade the solar system to 12 planets. Pluto would stay, but it's moon Cheron would be added as well a Xena which is larger (and further) than Pluto. The largest Asteroid Ceres would also re-gain it's planet status (it was considered a planet in the 1800's.)

That's so going to **** up kid's science projects.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Aucassin on August 18, 2006, 12:59 AM
Wait, NASA's going to let Officer Travis Junior fly the Shuttle?  :o

That was my first thought too!  ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 18, 2006, 01:15 AM
Wait, NASA's going to let Officer Travis Junior fly the Shuttle?  :o

1st. Robin Williams & now Officer Travis Junior, what more do you want?  ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 24, 2006, 06:20 PM
Pluto gets the boot. Pluto no longer a planet, say astronomers (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/08/24/pluto.ap/index.html)

Pluto Demoted: No Longer a Planet in Highly Controversial Definition (http://space.com/scienceastronomy/060824_planet_definition.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on August 24, 2006, 06:31 PM
Crap....does this mean I didn't actually get 100 on my Astonomy test in school when I said there were nine planets?  ???
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Famine on August 24, 2006, 07:37 PM
Tell this to my 2nd grade teacher.

Kevin
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on August 24, 2006, 11:02 PM
Pluto Demoted: No Longer a Planet in Highly Controversial Definition (http://space.com/scienceastronomy/060824_planet_definition.html)

The controversy is apparently pretty substantial.  Only some 400 plus Astronomers took part in this conference, while there are some 10,000 plus professional astronomers worldwide.  The minimal voting pool is certainly controversial since there are now the means to get a large number of votes from acredited scientists from all over the world.

The situation gets more convoluted when you take into account the criteria that this scientific body used to come to this conclusion.  They've stated that these dwarf planets are bodies in the solar system Pluto and by definition a dwarf planet  "has not cleared the neighborhood around its orbit, and is not a satellite."  Where the situation becomes questionable is regarding Earth and Jupiter.  Both Earth and Jupiter do not have clear orbital paths, with numerous asteroids in the vicinity of both planet's orbits.  And what reasonable person would argue that either Earth or Jupiter should be classified as dwarf planets?

An interesting side note to all of this news, there were other bodies in the solar system that were being considered for planetary status.  One is Ceres, the largest object in the asteroid belt.  Unfortunately for Ceres, it's now a dwarf planet.  Oh well.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Deanpaul on August 24, 2006, 11:23 PM
Unfortunately for Ceres, it's now a dwarf planet.  Oh well.

Poor Ceres.  Not being a planet is going ruin their tourism campaign.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Rob on August 25, 2006, 12:12 AM
The controversy is apparently pretty substantial.  Only some 400 plus Astronomers took part in this conference, while there are some 10,000 plus professional astronomers worldwide

I could be remembering wrong, but I'm pretty sure that today on CNN they reported that it was 2,500 astronomers at the conference.

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 25, 2006, 12:22 AM
Yes, 2500 were at the conference but the vote involved just 424 who remained for the last day of a meeting according to both links I posted.

Maybe the rest had better things to do!  :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on August 25, 2006, 10:22 AM
Attack of the Show and G4's website have some pretty funny stuff about Pluto's demotion.

As of today, I'm starting the campaign to make Pluto a planet again!!  Who's With me?!  ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 26, 2006, 03:48 PM
Shuttle launch delayed till Monday (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/08/26/atlantis.launch/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060826_sts115_lightning_02.jpg)

Remote cameras captured a lightning strike at the launch pad on Friday, Aug. 25, 2006. Photo credit: NASA.

They launch on my moving day, guess I'll have to catch up later on in the mission.  :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 27, 2006, 04:20 PM
Another delay for the launch of Atlantis.

From Nasa.gov:

NASA Working 'Competing Objectives' on Atlantis Launch

NASA is keeping an eye on Hurricane Ernesto as engineers continue to analyze data following the lightning strike at the shuttle Atlantis' launch pad on Friday. The next launch attempt is currently set for Tuesday, Aug. 29, at 3:41 p.m. EDT.

The orbiter and external tank teams have cleared their systems of any concerns from the strike, and shuttle engineers are now working together, looking at all elements as combined system, according to Associate Administrator for Space Operations Bill Gerstenmaier. The combined data should help the solid rocket booster team determine if their system is clear as well, he added.

Meanwhile, with Ernesto tracking towards central Florida, NASA has to start preparing to roll Atlantis back to the Vehicle Assembly Building before high winds hit Cape Canaveral.

"We have really two competing objectives," Gerstenmaier said. "One, we want to get the vehicle ready to go fly. The other objective is we want to get the vehicle ready to roll back to the VAB ... At some point in the sequence you have to give up on either one or the other. That point hasn't occured yet, but it's coming this evening and we're going to have to make a decision."

The Mission Management Team will meet again tonight at 6 p.m. to consider both issues. A briefing will follow live on NASA TV, no earlier than 8 p.m. EDT.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 1, 2006, 03:13 PM
Well now that the move is done, I can catch up on the mission.  :)

From NASA.gov

Aug. 29, 2006.

Shuttle Atlantis Rolls Back to Launch Pad to Ride Out Ernesto:

NASA managers decided early Tuesday to move the Space Shuttle Atlantis from its launch pad into the Vehicle Assembly Building for protection from approaching Tropical Storm Ernesto, but later in the day, when the weather forecast improved, they reversed the decision and began moving Atlantis back to the pad.

Launch preparations resumed at NASA's Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39B on Thursday, as mission managers set Sept. 6 as the new date for the launch of the space shuttle on Mission STS-115 to the International Space Station. Liftoff time is 12:29 p.m. EDT.

I'll have to catch the replays after work.

The SMART-1 European lunar orbiter (http://www.esa.int/SPECIALS/SMART-1/index.html) is set to crash into the moon this weekend, should be interesting.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 3, 2006, 03:33 AM
Can't wait to see this pic that the Hawaiian observatory captured.

Europe's spacecraft hits the moon (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/03/europe.moon.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 3, 2006, 05:07 PM
(http://www.space.com/images/060903_smart-1_cfht_02.jpg)

The lunar impact of the SMART-1 robotic probe on Sept. 3, 2006 is seen as an infrared flash in the upper right of this image from the Canada-France-Hawaii Telescope. Credit: CFHT, Christian Veillet.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 7, 2006, 10:26 AM
Atlantis delayed again. (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/06/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)  :(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 8, 2006, 12:32 PM
Interesting blurb about extra solar habitable planets. (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/08/earthlike.planets.reut/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 8, 2006, 05:18 PM
NASA scrubs shuttle launch, hopes for better luck Saturday  (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/08/shuttle.launch/index.html)

Better luck tomorrow, launch is now set for 11:15 a.m. EDT (1515 GMT) tomorrow, with weather forecasts offering an 80 percent chance of favorable flight conditions, NASA said.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 9, 2006, 01:00 PM
Atlantis flawlessly roars into space (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/09/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_115_launch.jpg)

Image above: Space Shuttle Atlantis lifts off from Launch Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Photo Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 10, 2006, 12:22 PM
(http://www.space.com/images/060910_atlantis_boom_02.jpg)

The shuttle's robot arm is maneuvered into position over Atlantis' payload bay prior to the attachment of the orbiter boom sensor system. Photo Credit: NASA TV.

Inspection Shows No Damage to Atlantis.
By Mike Schneider, Associated Press.

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) -- Early results from an inspection of space shuttle Atlantis using sensors attached to a boom showed no evidence of damage to the shuttle's thermal skin as it soars to the international space station, a flight director said Sunday.

"I have not seen a single problem with the vehicle,'' said flight director Paul Dye. "So far, everything has gone exactly according to plan except for the fact that we're a little bit early.''

A decision won't be made for a couple of days on whether NASA will use an extra day to do a "focused inspection'' on areas of the space shuttle that could look suspicious, Dye said.

"I haven't seen anything that's caught my eye,'' Dye said.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 10, 2006, 10:40 PM
(http://www.space.com/images/060910_sts115_iceramp2_02.jpg)

This image, taken by an STS-115 astronauts just after reaching orbit, shows one area of ice frost ramp foam loss during Atlantis' Sept. 9, 2006 launch. None of the lost foam appeared to damage the orbiter. Credit: NASA/JSC.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 11, 2006, 07:39 PM
Astronauts deliver addition to space station (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/11/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060911_sts115_astros_02.jpg)

The Expedition 13 crew welcomes the STS-115 crew aboard the International Space Station on Sept. 11, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060911_STS115_arm_02.jpg)

The station robotic arm, Canadarm2 (lower right corner), prepares to grapple the P3/P4 Truss from the shuttle robotic arm. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060911_sts115_dock_arm_02.jpg)

The space shuttle Atlantis' robotic arm - controlled by STS-115 astronaut Daniel Burbank - grapples the Port 3/Port 4 (P3/P4) truss segments for the International Space Station (ISS) while docked at the station's Destiny lab. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/060911truss/truss1.jpg)

(http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/060911truss/truss1a.jpg)

(http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/060911truss/truss2.jpg)

(http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/060911truss/truss3.jpg)

(http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/060911truss/truss4.jpg)

(http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/060911truss/truss5.jpg)

(http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts115/060911truss/truss6.jpg)

This collection of images shows the Port 3/Port 4 solar array truss being hoisted out of Atlantis' payload bay by the shuttle's robot arm and then handed off to the space station's arm. Credit: NASA TV/Spaceflight Now.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 12, 2006, 12:50 AM
(http://www.space.com/images/060911_sts115_rpm_02.jpg)

Astronauts aboard the International Space Station photograph the tile-covered belly of the Atlantis shuttle during a pre-docking Rotational Pitch Maneuver on Sept. 11, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060911_sts115_atlantis_02.jpg)

The space shuttle Atlantis performs an orbital backflip before docking at the International Space Station (ISS) on Sept. 11, 2006. Its 17.5-ton cargo of new station trusses and solar arrays is visible in this view from the ISS. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060911_sts115_dock_02.jpg)

NASA's Atlantis orbiter can be seen moored to a docking port at the aft end of the International Space Station's Destiny laboratory in this view from an exterior camera on Sept. 11, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

NASA: No Extra Heat Shield Inspections for Shuttle Atlantis.

HOUSTON – The six-astronaut crew of NASA’s shuttle Atlantis will not have to wedge extra inspections into an already packed flight to the International Space Station (ISS), NASA officials said late Monday.

“There will be no need for focused inspections for this mission,” NASA commentator Nicole Cloutier-Lemasters said of the heat shield look as Atlantis’ STS-115 astronauts slept in preparation for their mission’s first spacewalk on Tuesday.

NASA engineers found 495 areas of interest on Atlantis’ heat shield from a detailed Sunday inspection and high-resolution photographs taken by ISS crewmembers just before the shuttle docked at the orbital laboratory today. But nearly all of those areas were cleared by Monday afternoon.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 12, 2006, 07:21 PM
Spacewalker loses bolt and spring (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/12/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060912_atlantis_cargobay_02.jpg)

Atlantis' truss and collapsed solar arrays can be seen in this photo taken from the International Space Station. A third array, as well Newton's apple seed descendants and a rock from the summit of Mt. Everest remains out of view inside the crew compartment. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060821_iss_post115_02.jpg)

This illustration depicts the current configuration of the ISS (faded) with the addition of its new Port 3/Port 4 (P3/P4) truss and solar arrays (in color at right) after NASA's STS-115 shuttle flight is complete. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060912_p3p4_install_02.jpg)

STS-115 astronaut Steven MacLean and ISS flight engineer Jeffrey Williams used the station's robotic arm to attach thee 17.5-ton Port 3/Port 4 truss segments in its berth on the orbital lab's port side on Sept. 12, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/sts115_atlantis_eva1_02.jpg)

STS-115 spacewalker Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper is silhouetted against the Earth after swinging out the arm-like boxes of a new solar array (right) outside the International Space Station (ISS) on Sept. 12, 2006.

In other space news:

Pluto is Now Just a Number: 134340.

Pluto has been given a new name to reflect its new status as a dwarf planet.

On Sept. 7, the former 9th planet was assigned the asteroid number 134340 by the Minor Planet Center (MPC), the official organization responsible for collecting data about asteroids and comets in our solar system.

The move reinforces the International Astronomical Union's (IAU) recent decision to strip Pluto of its planethood and places it in the same category as other small solar-system bodies with accurately known orbits.

Pluto's companion satellites, Charon, Nix and Hydra are considered part of the same system and will not be assigned separate asteroid numbers, said MPC director emeritus Brian Marsden. Instead, they will be called 134340 I, II and III, respectively.

There are currently 136,563 asteroid objects recognized by the MPC; 2,224 new objects were added last week, of which Pluto was the first.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 13, 2006, 09:15 PM
'How many astronauts does it take to unscrew a bolt?' (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/13/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060913_sts115_eva2end_02.jpg)

STS-115 astronauts Daniel Burbank (right) and Steven MacLean - of the Canadian Space Agency - prepare the International Space Station's Port 3/Port 4 truss to deploy new solar arrays during a Sept. 13, 2006 spacewalk. Credit: NASA TV.

NASA Craft Settles Into Mars Orbit: (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/)

PASADENA, Calif. (AP) _ The most powerful spacecraft ever sent to Mars has settled into a nearly circular orbit, a move that allows scientists to begin studying the planet in unprecedented detail, NASA said Tuesday.

The Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter fired its thrusters for 12 minutes Monday to adjust to its final position six months after it arrived at the planet. Its altitude ranges between 155 to 196 miles above the surface.

Getting to this point is a great achievement,'' said Dan Johnston, deputy mission manager at the space agency's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, which manages the $720 million mission.

Over the next several months, the orbiter will deploy its 33-foot antenna and remove a lens cap from one of its instruments. It will begin collecting data in November, and scientists expect the resolution of those images to be nine times higher.

The unmanned orbiter safely slipped into orbit around Mars in March after a seven-month, 310 million-mile journey. It joined three other spacecraft currently flying around the planet and two rovers rolling across the surface.

Several weeks after entering orbit, a high-resolution camera aboard the spacecraft beamed back a test image showing the planet's southern highlands and cratered surface.

The orbiter spent the last half-year repeatedly dipping in to the upper atmosphere to shrink its orbit in a tricky process known as aerobraking.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 14, 2006, 08:21 PM
Spacewalkers lose the darndest things (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/14/space.junk.ap/index.html)

Space station spreads its solar wings (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/14/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060914_atlantis_docking_02.jpg)

Action was brisk outside the space shuttle/space station tandem when this digital still image was recorded on Sept. 12. Astronauts Joseph R. Tanner and Heidemarie M. Stefanyshyn-Piper participated in the first of three scheduled STS-115 extravehicular activity (EVA) sessions as the Atlantis astronauts and the Expedition 13 crew members join efforts this week to resume construction of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060914_sts115_truss_02.jpg)

STS-115 spacewalker Daniel Burbank can be recognized by the broken red stripe on each leg of his spacesuit in this image, with Steven MacLean, representing the Canadian Space Agency, just above and to the right of Burbank. One of two new solar arrays - still undeployed - appear as a giant letter 'T' behind them. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060914_iss_newarray_02.jpg)

A new starboard solar array, known as 2A, is fully deployed outside the International Space Station (ISS) by NASA's STS-115 crew on Sept. 14, 2006.

(http://www.space.com/images/060914_iss_portarray_02.jpg)

One of two new solar arrays, known as 4A, delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) this week by NASA's STS-115 crew rolls out to expose one mast bay on Sept. 14, 2006.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 15, 2006, 08:42 PM
Astronauts complete final spacewalk (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/15/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060914_sts115_tannereva3_02.jpg)

A view from STS-115 spacewalker Joseph Tanner's helmet camera shows a view of the International Space Station - its new Port 4 solar arrays at the top right - in a Sept. 15, 2006 spacewalk. The older Port 6 solar arrays and ISS Ku-band antenna are on the left. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060915_sts115_piperrad_02.jpg)

With Earth as her backdrop, STS-115 astronaut Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper releases a series of latches and cinches on the Port 4 radiato (the large box-like unit to her right) during a Sept. 15, 2006 spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV/

(http://www.space.com/images/060915_sts115_iss_radiat_02.jpg)

The new Port 4 solar array radiator is fully deployed outside the International Space Station (ISS) on Sept. 15, 2006, allowing the solar arrays to support themselves until they are brought into the outpost's power grid. Credit: NASA TV.

First female space tourist poised for launch (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/15/space.tourist.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 16, 2006, 02:53 PM
Engineers Prep Soyuz Rocket For Monday blastoff:

(http://www.space.com/images/060916_soyuz_rollout_02.jpg)

At 5 hours 00 minutes Moscow Time space-rocket system Soyuz was rolled out from the Integration and Checkout Facility to the launch pad. Credit: Energia.

(http://www.space.com/images/060916_soyuz_erect_02.jpg)

An image of the launch vehicle Soyuz-FG carrying Soyuz TMA-9 transportation spacecraft being erected on the launch pad. Credit: Energia.

(http://www.space.com/images/060916_sts115_exp13_prs_02.jpg)

Bottom row (from left): Expedition 13's Thomas Reiter, Pavel Vinogradov and Jeffrey Williams. Middle row: STS-115 mission specialists Joseph Tanner, Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, commander Brent Jett. Top row: pilot Chris Ferguson, STS-115 mission specialists Daniel Burbank, Steven MacLean. Credit: NASA TV.

The STS-115 astronauts enjoyed some off duty time and transferred cargo Saturday, their last full day at the International Space Station. Space Shuttle Atlantis and the STS-115 crew are slated to undock at 8:50 a.m. EDT Sunday.

The crew members received free time Saturday morning. This came on the heels of a four-day stretch in which they performed three spacewalks in a four-day period. The spacewalks featured tasks to prepare the station’s newly installed P3/P4 integrated truss for operation. The crew attached the truss to the station Sept. 12 prior to the start of the first spacewalk.

The transfer activities included loading Atlantis with station items that are returning to Earth, including science experiment results.

The STS-115 and Expedition 13 crews also held the traditional joint crew news conference earlier today. STS-115 Commander Brent Jett said this mission is a good start to the series of upcoming construction flights. “All of the rest of the assembly missions are going to be challenging.” Jett said. “We have similar payloads flying in the future. We are off to a good start on assembly. I think we can pass along a lot of the lessons to the future crews.”

Atlantis is scheduled to land at 5:57 a.m. on Wednesday at the Space Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Credit NASA.gov
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 17, 2006, 04:30 PM
Shuttle crew heads for home, Wednesday landing planned (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/17/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/v_sts114_iss_flyaround_02.jpg)

A view of the International Space Station (ISS) before the STS-115 mission taken in July 2005 during a partial flyaround by the STS-114 crew. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060917_sts115_undockA_02.jpg)

The International Space Station (ISS) as seen by cameras aboard NASA's space shuttle Atlantis during a flyaround after the orbiter undocked from the orbital laboratory on Sept. 17, 2006 during the STS-115 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

First female 'space tourist' ready for blastoff (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/17/space.female.tourist/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 18, 2006, 12:54 AM
Female space tourist blasts off (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/18/space.female.tourist/index.html)

(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/Darth%20Vader/Anousheh%20Ansari.jpg)

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 18, 2006, 07:13 PM
Space station crew cleaning up toxic spill (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/18/space.station.smell.reut/index.html)

Shuttle inspected ahead of landing (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/18/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060918_sts115_boom_02.jpg)

A camera aboard Space Shuttle Atlantis captured this view of the payload bay shortly before the start of the inspection of the shuttle's heat shield. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060918_sts115_heatshield_02.jpg)

A close-up look of Atlantis' heat shield taken by astronauts aboard the International Space Station before the orbiter docked on Sept. 11, 2006 during the STS-115 mission. Credit: NASA

More on the stairway to heaven:

Express lift to the stars (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/18/space.elevator/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 19, 2006, 07:52 PM
Well, no landing today as it looks like something may have come off the Atlantis.

Mystery object delays shuttle landing (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/19/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060919_mystery_object_02.jpg)

Tomorrow's early morning shuttle landing has been delayed after NASA detected of a mystery object hovering between the shuttle and Earth. Credit: NASA

(http://www.space.com/images/060919_myst_object_02.jpg)

In this picture obtained by collectSpace.com , a piece of debris is seen near the orbiter Atlantis. The photo was taken by the STS-115 crew today. Credit: NASA, collectSpace.com

(http://www.space.com/images/060912_sts115_shim_02.jpg)

An orange strip of plastic, known as shim stock, juts from the port external tank umbilical door in this close-up shot of Atlantis' belly during its STS-115 mission. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images//060911_sts115_gapfiller_02.jpg)

The largest protruding gap-filler on Atlantis during its STS-115 flight is barely hanging on by a corner and shown here with dimensions displayed. Credit: NASA.

Updates on other space news...

(http://www.space.com/images/060918_prog21_undock_02.jpg)

The Russian-built Progress 21 cargo ship leaves the International Space Station on Sept. 18, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

An unmanned Russian cargo ship left a berth at the International Space Station (ISS) to destroy itself late Monday, clearing a docking port for three spaceflyers now bound for the orbital laboratory.

Filled with trash and other unneeded equipment, the Progress 21 supply ship slipped away from its aft docking port of the space station’s Zvezda service module at about 8:30 p.m. EDT (0030 Sept. 19 GMT) while the outpost’s three-astronaut crew Expedition 13 crew slumbered – an ISS first – and fired its thrusters at the behest of Russia’s Mission Control.

Ansari and the Expedition 14 crew are expected to dock at the ISS at about 1:24 a.m. EDT (0524 GMT) Wednesday.

Scientists: We must return to the moon (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/19/return.to.the.moon.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 20, 2006, 07:19 PM
NASA: Atlantis to land Thursday (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/20/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/h_060920_sts115_inspect_02.jpg)

This mystery object spotted floating between Atlantis and the Earth prompted a one-day delay for the shuttle's landing and new inspections of the orbiter's heat shield near the end of NASA's STS-115 mission. Credit: NASA.

Female space tourist arrives at space station (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/20/russia.space.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060920_soyuz_approach_02.jpg)

The Soyuz spacecraft carrying the Expedition 14 crew and spaceflight participant Anousheh Ansari approaches the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060920_hatch_open_02.jpg)

The Expedition 13 crew welcomes Expedition 14 and spaceflight participant Anousheh Ansari aboard the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 21, 2006, 07:33 PM
Atlantis lands safely in Florida (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/21/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060919_iss_sts115_02.jpg)

The International Space Station (ISS) as seen by astronauts aboard the space shuttle Atlantis after undocking on Sept. 17, 2006 during NASA's STS-115 mission. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/060921_atlantis_tdown_02.jpg)

Space Shuttle Atlantis landing at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Photo Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 28, 2006, 11:22 PM
Space tourist, crew touch down (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/09/28/russia.space.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/060928_soyuz_landed_02.jpg)

A photograph taken shortly after ground crews arrived at the Soyuz landing spot in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060928_ansari_landed_02.jpg)

Groundcrews presented Anousheh Ansari with a bouquet of roses and an apple after she was pulled out of the cramped confines of the Soyuz spacecraft. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/060928_soyuz_crew_02.jpg)

Ansari, Vinogradov and Williams are wrapped in blankets to keep warm as they get reacusstomed to Earth's gravity. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Tracy on October 4, 2006, 02:58 PM
Not quite "Official Space Exploration", but close enough :).  I would love to see the Aurora Borealis (http://reference.aol.com/space/auroras) just once.  Maybe some of my fellow JD'ers to the North and Canada will get a chance to see them tonight.  Damn -- it almost makes me jealous of you Yankees......
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 5, 2006, 01:22 AM
Aurora Borealis, saw a few the other night. Not great right now but when they dance...  8)

When the group of us from Shane's toy show went to Banff back in March, Gus Lopez mentioned about the Aurora Borealis & that he never has really seen them. He went to an area in the town that was darker but no luck.

I'll have to break out the Camcorder & see if I can capture them.   :)

Have a looky at the Northern Lights from our city, just scroll down & look for Edmonton.

Aurora Gallery Sept. 30-Oct. 9, 2002 (http://science.nasa.gov/spaceweather/aurora/gallery_01oct02_c.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 8, 2006, 10:23 PM
Mars images show rover perched on crater (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/10/06/victoriaimages/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/091006_mro_vict_rover_02.jpg)

This image is a close-up of NASA's Mars rover Opportunity at Victoria Crater as seen by the HiRISE camera aboard the space agency's powerful Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA/JPL/UA.

(http://www.space.com/images/091006_mro_victoria_02.jpg)

This image from the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter shows "Victoria Crater," an impact crater at Meridiani Planum, near the equator of Mars. Credit: NASA/JPL/UA.

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2006/TECH/space/10/06/victoriaimages/story.mars.crater.stadium.jpg)

Scientists say the crater is big enough to hold four or five football stadiums.

Space debris punched hole in shuttle (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/10/06/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160064main_OV104_radiator_hole_01_th.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160063main_OV104_radiator_hole_01.jpg)  (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160068main_OV104_radiator_hole_inset_th.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160067main_OV104_radiator_hole_inset.jpg)  (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160066main_OV104_radiator_hole_02_th.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160065main_OV104_radiator_hole_02.jpg)

Micrometeoroid Orbital Debris (MMOD) impact on Atlantis' (STS-115) right hand payload bay door radiator (.1 inch diameter). Photo Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on October 9, 2006, 09:42 AM
I had just read an article, (sorry to not have the link) that there was another successful teleportation test. While the first was a single particle of matter transported a very short distance (about an inch,) this next test was a microscopic item millions of atoms big transported a few feet away.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 9, 2006, 09:00 PM
Linky.  ;)

Scientists teleport two different objects (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/science/10/04/teleportation.reut/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on October 11, 2006, 12:33 AM
Aurora Borealis, saw a few the other night. Not great right now but when they dance...  8)

When the group of us from Shane's toy show went to Banff back in March, Gus Lopez mentioned about the Aurora Borealis & that he never has really seen them. He went to an area in the town that was darker but no luck.

I'll have to break out the Camcorder & see if I can capture them.   :)

Have a looky at the Northern Lights from our city, just scroll down & look for Edmonton.

Aurora Gallery Sept. 30-Oct. 9, 2002 (http://science.nasa.gov/spaceweather/aurora/gallery_01oct02_c.html)

When I lived in North Pole, Alaska, I could see the Northern lights all the time in the winter.  They were there in the summertime as well, but they could not be seen due to the sun being up all the time.  I never got tired of watching them and sometimes they would light up the entire sky!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Straxus on October 11, 2006, 06:00 AM
I saw Aurora Borealis for the first time here in Oregon. I was totaly freaked out... I had just left work and had started to think that the cleaning chemicals at work were starting to make me hallucinate, but my boss noticed as well. Took a minute to realize what it was. I confirmed later on the news that it was the Northern Lights. I think the only reason I saw it here was due to strong Solar activity. I think that was about two or three years ago.

I had heard about scientist teleporting one atom at a time, but that link shows they have started to make some really impressive leaps and bounds.
Quote
The experiment involved for the first time a macroscopic atomic object containing thousands of billions of atoms
That is such a HUGE leap in advancement. Now we may not be teleporting anything or anyone that you could see, but its still teleportation!!!
The advancements in computer technology will be amazing if it works right!
I have to remind myself sometimes just how exciting of a time we are living in and experiencing right now! Despite all the crazy crap going on in the world there is some really bizaar and awesome things happening as well!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 22, 2006, 07:38 PM
Live now!  8)

Spacewalkers to Tee Off on Science, Mechanics (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/expeditions/expedition14/exp14_eva_112206.html)

The spacewalk will feature everything from science through nuts and bolts to golf.

International Space Station Commander Mike Lopez-Alegria and Flight Engineer Mikhail Tyurin are scheduled to leave the Pirs docking compartment airlock Wednesday for the almost-six-hour spacewalk.

Tyurin will be the lead spacewalker, EV1, and Lopez-Alegria will be EV2. They will wear Russian Orlan spacesuits with red stripes.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/163058main_exp14_msb_laws_golf_250.jpg)

NASA Live Video Link (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/live_tv.html)

This should be cool.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 22, 2006, 07:57 PM
Whoa! That was awesome!  ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 23, 2006, 08:27 PM
(http://www.space.com/images/061122_golfshot_02.jpg)

Expedition 14 flight engineer Mikhail Tyurin hitting a lightweight golf ball as part of a publicity stunt for Canadian golf firm, Element 21. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 9, 2006, 09:05 PM
Space Shuttle Discovery and a crew of seven astronauts lifted off from Kennedy Space Center's launch pad in a rare night launch at 8:47 p.m. EST.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/164091main_night_distance.jpg)

(http://www.space.com/images/061013_sts116_port_02.jpg)

Front Row: (from the left) shuttle pilot William Oefelein, mission specialist Joan Higginbotham and commander Mark Polansky. Back row (from the left) are mission specialists Robert Curbeam, Nicholas Patrick, Sunita Williams and Christer Fuglesang of the European Space Agency. Credit: NASA/JSC.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on December 9, 2006, 09:10 PM
That was a beautiful launch!  The video from the main fuel tank after the SRB jettison was amazing, too.  I think that's the first time we've seen that camera angle during a night launch.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Tracy on December 9, 2006, 09:28 PM
My brother is in Florida visting his in-laws and was able to take his 5 and 9 year old sons to see the launch tonight.  I'm sure its an experience they will never forget.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 9, 2006, 09:44 PM
A few years back, my sister in-law took a Florida cruise & NASA had a night launch. She said it lit the night sky up & you could hear the crackle of the engines.  8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/164091main_launch_grab.jpg)

Space Shuttle Discovery's engines fire to begin its liftoff from Kennedy Space Center. Image Credit: NASA.

(http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images/thumbnails/06pd2732-t.jpg) (http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images//large/06pd2732.jpg) (http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images/thumbnails/06pd2733-t.jpg) (http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images//large/06pd2733.jpg)(http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images/thumbnails/06pd2734-t.jpg) (http://www-pao.ksc.nasa.gov/kscpao/images//large/06pd2734.jpg)

Image Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/061209_discovery_launch_02.jpg)

NASA's space shuttle Discovery blasts off from Pad 39B at Kennedy Space Center. Credit: collectSPACE.com.
 
A sight to behold!  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 10, 2006, 04:24 PM
Discovery crew checks for launch damage (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/10/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/164379main_116_pldb.jpg)

A video camera aboard Discovery captured this view of the payload bay. Image Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 11, 2006, 08:45 PM
Shuttle docks with space station (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/11/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/sts116_iss_predock_02.jpg)

A camera aboard the space shuttle Discovery captures the International Space Station just before the two spacecraft docked with one another on Dec. 11, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/061211_sts116-rpm_02.jpg)

STS-116 commander Mark Polanksy guides the shuttle Discovery through a 360-degree backflip in this view taken from an International Space Station camera before docking on Dec. 11, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/061211_sts116_iss_pstdck_02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery (right) is seen docked at the International Space Station after a successful rendezvous on Dec. 11, 2006. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 12, 2006, 07:16 PM
The Big meteor shower Wednesday night (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/12/meteor.shower/index.html)

The First of 3 spacewalks under way (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/12/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/164695main_eva1bc.jpg)

Mission Specialist Bob Curbeam participates in the first spacewalk of the STS-116 mission. Image Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/061211_disc_tiles_02.jpg)

An high resolution image taken by ISS crewmembers during Discovery's rotational pitch maneuver revealed minor scuffs and discolorations around the external tank umbilical cord door on the orbiter's port wing. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nathan on December 13, 2006, 02:23 PM
Nobel acceptance caps NASA's big week (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061211/ap_on_sc/nasa_s_big_week_4)

Quote
On Wednesday, NASA scientists announced they'd found compelling evidence that running water may have flowed recently on Mars. Some of the last pictures taken by the agency's Mars Global Surveyor showed changes in craters that provide the strongest evidence yet that water coursed through them recently and is perhaps doing so even now.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 13, 2006, 08:21 PM
NASA smoothing out pesky panels (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/13/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/061213_sts116_discovery_02.jpg)

This view of the nose and part of the crew cabin of Space Shuttle Discovery was provided by an Expedition 14 crewmember during a back-flip performed by the approaching STS-116 crew to the International Space Station on Dec. 11, 2006. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/061212_mars_crater_02.jpg)

A newfound 75-foot crater. Wispy dark rays and dark, annular (nearly-circular) zones surround the crater, while several chains of dark spots formed by secondary impact radiate away for hundreds of meters from the tiny crater. Credit: NASA/JPL/Malin Space Science Systems.

Solar storm headed for Earth (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/13/solar.storm/index.html)

Quote
SPACE.com) -- Space weather forecasters revised their predictions for storminess after a major flare erupted on the sun overnight threatening damage to communication systems and power grids while offering up the wonder of Northern Lights.

The storm is expected to generate aurora or Northern Lights, as far south as the northern United States Thursday night.

Just a reminder that this year's best Meteor Shower peaks tonight, the Geminid meteor shower, a reliable annual display, peaks tonight and into the pre-dawn. For skywatchers with dark, clear skies, this dazzling display should produce up to 120 meteors per hour.

The best time to watch is tonight or anytime between midnight and dawn Thursday.

(http://www.londonstimes.us/toons/cartoons/Simeon_MarsWater3.jpg) (http://www.athenamama.com/images/Mars_Water.jpg)  :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 14, 2006, 07:24 PM
The Spacewalkers rewiring orbiting lab (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/14/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/061214_sts116_eva2sites_02.jpg)

This labeled image of the International Space Station's central truss details the electrical and cooling system work sites for Discovery's STS-116 astronauts during their mission's second spacewalk. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/061214_sts116_curbeaeva_02.jpg)

STS-116 astronaut Robert Curbeam prepares to replace a faulty TV camera on the exterior of the International Space Station on Dec. 12, 2006. during the first of three planned spacewalks of the NASA mission. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on December 15, 2006, 01:12 PM
Jeff, what Planet or Moon is that creater picture from?





Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 15, 2006, 06:59 PM
That crater is a new impact on Mars, linky below.

The Mars Takes a Fresh Pounding (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/061211_st_mars_craters.html)

The How to fold a solar panel, NASA still scratching heads! (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/15/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 16, 2006, 03:53 PM
The Astronauts head out again for wiring job (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/16/space.walk.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/061215_sts116_grommet_02.jpg)

This photo highlights the P6 solar array guide wire and its grommet (circle) which is though to snag due to friction and prevent the solar wing from folding properly. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/061216_sts116curbeameva2_02.jpg)

STS-116 shuttle astronaut Robert Curbeam pauses for a photo during a Dec. 14, 2006 spacewalk to help rewire the International Space Station (ISS). Credit: NASA.

In other space news:

The Crowd cheers private spaceport's first launch (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/16/rocket.launch.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/061211_minotaur_wff_02.jpg)

An Orbital Sciences Minotaur rocket stands poised to launch the TacSat-2 satellite in the first ever orbital space shot from NASA's Wallops Flight Facility on Wallops Island, Virginia. Credit: Orbital Sciences, Corp.

(http://www.space.com/images/061216_tacsat2_minotaur_02.jpg)

The Minotaur I rocket carrying two experimental satellites into orbit lifts off Saturday, Dec. 16, 2006, in Atlantic, Va., in the first launch from the mid-Atlantic region's commercial spaceport. Credti: AP Photo/Gary C. Knapp.

FAA issues its first rules for space tourism (http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/nation/4406290.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 17, 2006, 12:48 AM
Wow!  :o   8)

(http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0612/suntsunami_nso.gif)

A Large Tsunami Shock Wave on the Sun:

Tsunamis this large don't happen on Earth. One week ago, a large solar flare from an Earth-sized sunspot produced a tsunami-type shock wave that was spectacular even for the Sun. Pictured above, the tsunami wave was captured moving out from active region AR 10930 by the Optical Solar Patrol Network (OSPAN) telescope in New Mexico, USA. The resulting shock wave, known technically as a Moreton wave, compressed and heated up gasses including hydrogen in the photosphere of the Sun, causing a momentarily brighter glow. The above image was taken in a very specific red color emitted exclusively by hydrogen gas. The rampaging tsunami took out some active filaments on the Sun, although many re-established themselves later. The solar tsunami spread at nearly one million kilometers per hour, and circled the entire Sun in a matter of minutes. Credit: NSO/AURA/NSF and USAF Research Laboratory.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 17, 2006, 07:57 PM
(http://www.space.com/images/061216_sts116_arrayshak_02.jpg)

STS-116 spacewalker Robert Curbeam shakes a troublesome solar array wing in an attemptto free stuck guide wires on Dec. 16, 2006. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/061217_sts116_cargo2_02.jpg)

Astronaut William Oefelein, STS-116 pilot, moves a stowage bag through the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Discovery was docked with the station. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/061217_sts116_cargo_02.jpg)

Astronaut Joan Higginbotham, STS-116 mission specialist and loadmaster, looks over procedures checklists in a hatch on space shuttle Discovery during flight day three activities. Credit: NASA.

Live video from NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 18, 2006, 07:32 PM
The Fourth spacewalk under way (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/18/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/061218_sts116_ev4_site_02.jpg)

This image shows the relative work area for STS-116 spacewalkers Robert Curbeam and Christer Fuglesang during the fourth, and unplanned, EVA to help furl a stubborn solar array outside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.space.com/images/061218_sts116_p6shake_02.jpg)

Astronauts Robert Curbeam, (red stripes), STS-116 mission specialist, and Sunita Williams, Expedition 14 flight engineer, work near the International Space Station's left P6 solar array wing during the mission's third planned session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction resumes on the International Space Station. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 20, 2006, 11:55 PM
(http://www.space.com/images/061218_eva4_prep_02.jpg)

STS-116 spacewalker Christer Fuglesang is seen clad in his NASA spacesuit before a Dec. 18, 2006 excursion to fold away a stubborn solar array outside the ISS. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/061218_sts116_eva4A_02.jpg)

STS-116 mission specialist Robert Curbeam works with a solar array during the fourth spacewalk of the STS-116 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.space.com/images/061220_sts116_scan_02.jpg)

As seen through windows on the aft flight deck of Space Shuttle Discovery, the payload bay is featured in this image photographed by a STS-116 crewmember flight day two activities. Credit: NASA.

NASA watching weather as shuttle landing nears (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/20/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 21, 2006, 06:26 PM
NASA debates shuttle landing sites (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/21/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.space.com/images/061219_sts116_issdepart_02.jpg)

A very different International Space Station is seen with one Port 6 solar array folded away (center right) and a new portside segment (far right) in view taken from the space shuttle Discovery after undocking during NASA's STS-116 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 22, 2006, 05:47 PM
Discovery home for the holidays (http://www.cnn.com/2006/TECH/space/12/22/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/166202main_s116e07838.jpg)

As seen through windows on the aft flight deck of Space Shuttle Discovery, a Department of Defense pico-satellite known as Atmospheric Neutral Density Experiment (ANDE) is released from the shuttle's payload bay by STS-116 crewmembers. ANDE consists of two micro-satellites which will measure the density and composition of the low Earth orbit (LEO) atmosphere while being tracked from the ground. The data will be used to better predict the movement of objects in orbit. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/164379main_s116e07308.jpg)

The Aurora Borealis, also known as "northern lights", is featured in this photograph taken by a STS-116 crew member onboard Discovery during flight day 11 activities. Image Credit: NASA.

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2006/TECH/space/12/22/space.shuttle.ap/story.discovery.return.nasa.jpg)

Discovery landed safely at 5:32 p.m. ET at Kennedy Space Center on Friday, bringing the mission to the space station to an end.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 4, 2007, 05:14 PM
NORAD looking for Russian rocket in Wyoming (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/01/04/russia.rocket.ap/index.html)

Check out the link below, they have awesome video of this breakup.  8)

'Space Junk' Bursts Into Flames 
NORAD: 'Meteor' really a rocket  (http://www.myfoxcolorado.com/myfox/pages/Home/Detail?contentId=1961501&version=28&locale=EN-US&layoutCode=TSTY&pageId=1.1.1)

(http://www.myfoxcolorado.com/myfox/photo_servlet?contentId=1961343&version=1&locale=EN-US&subtype=MIMG&siteId=1017&isP16=true)

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2007/TECH/space/01/04/russia.rocket.ap/vert.rocket.afp.gi.jpg)

A Russian rocket carrying a French-made spacecraft takes off December 27 at Baikonur cosmodrome in Kazakhstan.

Cops baffled by mystery object that crashed into home (http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/01/04/fallen.object.ap/index.html)

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2007/US/01/04/fallen.object.ap/story.mystery.object.ap.jpg)

Police say they can't identify this golf ball-sized object which fell into a home in New Jersey.

(http://i.a.cnn.net/cnn/2007/US/01/04/fallen.object.ap/story.mystery.object2.ap.jpg)

The object, which the FFA says is not an aircraft part, weight almost as much as a can of soup, police say.

(http://www.space.com/images/070103_mystery_object_02.jpg)

A metal object is held by Freehold Township Police Lt. Robert Brightman during a news conference in Freehold Township, N.J., Wednesday, Jan. 3, 2007. No one was injured when the object crashed through the roof of a Freehold Township home Tuesday and authorities have not identified the object. Credit: AP Photo/Mike Derer.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on January 5, 2007, 05:38 PM
I actually saw the Russian Rocket reentry Thursday morning on my way to work.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 5, 2007, 06:26 PM
That would have been a site to see.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on January 5, 2007, 08:25 PM
It was pretty cool  A lot of people called into the radio station and thought it was either a plane crash of a meteor.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on January 6, 2007, 11:36 AM
Nobel acceptance caps NASA's big week (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20061211/ap_on_sc/nasa_s_big_week_4)

Quote
On Wednesday, NASA scientists announced they'd found compelling evidence that running water may have flowed recently on Mars. Some of the last pictures taken by the agency's Mars Global Surveyor showed changes in craters that provide the strongest evidence yet that water coursed through them recently and is perhaps doing so even now.

I'm reading a book now called Magnificent Mars, it dicusses the probability of water on Mars to a great degree and just looking at the awesome color coded topographical photo's, it's hard not to imagine that the northern portion on Mars was an ocean at one point. There's also data that points to large chunks of ice that rest below the surface on half the planet.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nathan on January 9, 2007, 12:24 PM
Two NASA space probes that visited Mars 30 years ago may have stumbled upon alien microbes on the Red Planet and inadvertently killed them, a scientist theorizes in a paper released Sunday. (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,242339,00.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 13, 2007, 03:49 PM
Stargazers abuzz about new Comet McNaught (http://www.komotv.com/news/local/5175382.html)

(http://www.comcast.net/data/br/2007/01/11/br-33003.jpg)

The Comet McNaught steaks across the sky in Barrow, Alaska, Monday Jan. 8, 2007. The comet, discovered last year by Australian astronomer R.H. McNaught, is expected to remain visible in the Northern Hemisphere, conditions permitting, through Friday. (AP Photo/ Cindy Shults)

(http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2007/01/08/gallery/surprisecomet_zoom.jpg)

Showtime!
The brightening of Comet McNaught is visible in these side-by-side photographs taken by amateur astrophotographer Patrick Boomer on Jan. 6 and Jan. 7, 2007, in Alberta, Canada. Both photos were taken at 5:36 p.m. local time.

Cool video footage:

A bright new comet in clear view. Stargazers got a rare view of a comet named McNaught streaking across the skies above western Washington around sunset on Thursday night.  (http://www.komotv.com/home/video/5167132.html?video=pop&t=a)

Caught On Tap: Comet McNaught (http://www.thepittsburghchannel.com/video/10733629/index.html)

Watch Comet McNaught  (http://www.space.com/spacewatch/soho_lasco_c3_live.html)

More cool pictures:

2006-2007 appearance of Comet McNaught (http://skytonight.com/community/gallery/skyevents/5129766.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on January 14, 2007, 12:38 AM
Cool stuff.  Reminds me of the comets we could see in NC back in the 90's Hale-Bopp and Hyukatake.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 14, 2007, 01:02 AM
I remember seeing comet Kohoutek in the 70's, pretty neat.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Deanna Rash on January 14, 2007, 11:43 AM
I saw Hale-bopp and Halley's back in 86' With all the clouds and rain around I haven't seen nothing for days :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on January 14, 2007, 01:54 PM
There was one visiable here in Socal in the mid to late 90's. Would love to see another.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 14, 2007, 03:20 PM
Some spectacular images of Comet McNaught.

(http://www.space.com/images/ig321_mcnaught_Menardi_02.jpg)

Giuseppe Menardi captures a simply gorgeous shot of Comet McNaught over Mont Lagazuoi (2.800 mt).

(http://www.space.com/images/ig321_mcnaught_Menardi2_02.jpg)

Another stunning image of Comet McNaught captured by Giuseppe Menardi over Mont Lagazuoi (2.800 mt).

(http://www.space.com/images/ig321_mcnaught_Menardi3_02.jpg)

Giuseppe Menardi snaps Comet McNaught over the colorful skies of Mont Lagazuoi (2.800 mt). The comet is very bright (visual magnitude -3) with a 4-degree long tail.

More cool pictures:

Comet McNaught  (http://www.startrails.com/comets/gallery_mcnaught.htm)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Deanna Rash on January 15, 2007, 04:30 PM
 8) Those are nice pics ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Famine on January 17, 2007, 12:06 AM
I remember Hale-Bopp. Those were the days. I had a telescope then.

Kevin
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 19, 2007, 06:01 PM
Probe nears close encounter with Jupiter (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/01/19/new.horizons.jupiter.reut/index.html)

(http://pluto.jhuapl.edu/gallery/missionPhotos/images/large/JupiterIo010807.jpg)

Credit: NASA/Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory/Southwest Research Institute.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Famine on January 19, 2007, 07:56 PM
No mention of China's venture into Earth/Space demolition today?

Kevin
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 19, 2007, 11:42 PM
Chinese test missile obliterates satellite (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/01/18/china.missile/index.html)   :-*

Russia honors Sputnik designer (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/01/12/sputnik.designer.honored.ap/index.html)

Cargo ship docks with space station (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/01/19/russian.cargo.ship.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on January 20, 2007, 11:35 AM
In regards to the Pluto probe, it's going to take 8 years to get there from Jupiter and it's still the fastest man-made object ever. Amazing.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 27, 2007, 10:59 PM
Forty years ago today we remember Apollo 1 & her crew.  :'(

(http://www.space.com/images/h_apollo1_crew_02.jpg)

Apollo 1 astronauts pose in front of Pad 34. From left: Virgil I. Grissom, Edward H. White II, Roger B. Chafee. credit: NASA.

Tomorrow we remember the Challenger & her crew on the 21st anniversary.  :'(

(http://www.space.com/images/sts51L_crew_02.jpg)

Official portrait of the STS 51-L crewmembers: (Back row from left) mission specialist Ellison Onizuka, Teacher in Space participant Sharon Christa McAuliffe, payload specialist Greg Jarvis and mission specialist Judy Resnik. In the front row are pilot Michael Smith, commander Francis 'Dick' Scobee, and mission specialist Ronald McNair. Credit: NASA/JSC.

This Thursday, February 1st on the 4th anniversary we remember Columbia & her crew.  :'(

(http://www.space.com/images/h_sts107_inspace_02.jpg)

This image of the STS-107 crew in orbit was recovered from wreckage inside an undeveloped film canister. The shirt color's indicate their mission shifts. From left (bottom row): Kalpana Chawla, mission specialist; Rick Husband, commander; Laurel Clark, mission specialist; and Ilan Ramon, payload specialist. From left (top row) are astronauts David Brown, mission specialist; William McCool, pilot; and Michael Anderson, payload commander. Ramon represents the Israeli Space Agency. Credit: NASA/JSC.

"We shall never forget them nor the last time we saw them, as they prepared for their mission and waved good-bye and slipped the surly bonds of Earth to touch the face of God."

Still hurts listening to Reagan's Challenger's Tragedy Address (http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/ronaldreaganchallenger.htm).   :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 2, 2007, 06:52 PM
Just thought this was a good place to put this.  :)

'Star Trek' actor's ashes heading to space this month (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/04/02/doohan.ashes.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Lady Jaye on April 2, 2007, 08:52 PM
Still hurts listening to Reagan's Challenger's Tragedy Address (http://www.americanrhetoric.com/speeches/ronaldreaganchallenger.htm).   :'(

If you don't mind me asking, why do the deaths of the Challenger crew move you so?? Are you, or were you, a part of some space program?? If not, just wondering why it affects you still, especially the moving speech by Reagan?

Oh and I remember the day it happened. We didn't watch it, but were told about it in class by my teacher, who was obviously shaken up by it. We were so young, we really didn't know what to make of it, but saw the pain in our favorite teacher's eyes! So we were saddened as well.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 2, 2007, 09:27 PM
Why? I grew up watching the launches, from the days of Gemini, Apollo, Skylab, Apollo-Soyuz & the Shuttle. I'm from an Air Force family, I grew up with flight but space... it intrigues me. I have a space collection, books, pics, patches, models, coins, plates etc. I'd give Brents left nut up to go into space.  ;D

Thanks for bumping this up Scott, it's a day I remember very well.  :'(

20 years ago today I was in Las Vegas with friends. We rented a car and were on our way to tour Hover Dam that morning, on the radio I heard there was an accident with Challenger. We checked out the Dam then headed back to Vegas, once in the hotel there was a strange feeling, very quiet.

I went to my room and my roommate who stayed back was watching TV, he said "I think you better watch this". It was a replay of the launch, I watched then my heart just sunk. I just stared at the TV, they kept playing it over and over. There was a bottle of tequila next to the set and I poured a glass and shot it down, then I went out on the the balcony and broke down. After awhile I went to the lobby, TV's were on and Regan was addressing the nation.

The next day, my friend and I drove to to Edwards Air Force Base for a tour but sadly the base was close. This was I trip I planned long before and I was very happy to return that year in September.  :)

(http://shillpages.com/movies/rightstuff1983dvd.gif)   :-*
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 9, 2007, 04:28 AM
Whoa! Been awhile since anything really happened. The Lisa Nowak female astronaut that went wacko is not really space worthy me thinks.  ::)

After a long delay of fixing the external tank from hailstorm damage, the shuttle Atlantis is off & running.  8)

Atlantis rockets to space (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/08/space.shuttle/index.html)

Great pics in the NASA image gallery (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts117/multimedia/launch/launch.html) & if you missed the launch, you can view the video in the NASA video section (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/on_demand_video.html?param=|http://anon.nasa-global.edgesuite.net/anon.nasa-global/ksc/ksc_060807_sts117_launch.ram|http://anon.nasa-global.edgesuite.net/anon.nasa-global/ksc/ksc_060807_sts117_launch.asx).

Also noted that on May 3rd 2007, Wally Schirra passed away at 84. He was one of the original Mercury 7 astronauts and the third American to orbit the Earth. Of the Mercury 7, only John Glenn & Scott Carpenter  are still alive.

Bye, Wally. You will be missed. :'(

(http://www.nndb.com/people/941/000022875/wally-schirra-med.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 9, 2007, 11:41 PM
Shuttle docking a 'go' despite gap in heat blanket (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/09/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070609_sts117_blanket_02.jpg)

This view from a camera mounted to the space shuttle Atlantis' robotic arm shows the torn thermal blanket seen just after the orbiter's June 8, 2007 launch into space. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 10, 2007, 04:21 PM
Shuttle docks successfully (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/10/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/179064main_sts117_atlantis_dock.jpg)

Space Shuttle Atlantis is pictured moments after docking to the International Space Station's Destiny laboratory. Image credit: NASA TV
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 11, 2007, 06:26 PM
Astronauts begin spacewalk to fix space station (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/11/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/179223main_eva1_061107_hatchopen.jpg)

STS-117 Mission Specialist John "Danny" Olivas (top) exits the International Space Station's Quest airlock during the early moments of the mission's first spacewalk. His partner, Jim Reilly, prepares tools that will be used during the excursion. Image credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070610_sts117_blanketdam_02.jpg)

This photograph, taken by an STS-117 crewmember, shows the damaged thermal insulation blanket on the left OMS pod of the space shuttle Atlantis on June 10, 2007. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070610_sts117_blanketbm_02.jpg)

This close-up view of the space shuttle Atlantis' damaged OMS pod thermal blanket was captured by the orbiter's sensor-laden inspection boom during a heat shield survey on June 9, 2007 of the STS-117 mission. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on June 12, 2007, 12:47 AM
I was watching some of the helmet cam video today on NASA's tv channel.  Great stuff!  Who knew that they could get that good of a signal from the spacesuit and distribute that worldwide.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 12, 2007, 07:13 PM
Yepper, great stuff indeed.  8)

Space station gets a new set of solar wings (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/12/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070612_arraydeploy_02.jpg)

The space station's new solar array wings wait to be fully unfurled. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070612_array3a_deploy_02.jpg)

A new solar wing, known as the 3A array, is half-unfurled at tip of the International Space Station's new S4 truss on June 12, 2007 during NASA's STS-117 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070612_array1a_deploy_02.jpg)

The starboard 1A solar array extends out from the newly delivered S4 truss at the International Space Station after a successful deployment on June 12, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on June 14, 2007, 09:27 AM
Mystery of oceans on Mars solved? (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19209968/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 14, 2007, 08:16 PM

Small problem earlier today with the computers that control the oxygen and water supplies & navigation & attitude control . All is good thus far but will take a little time to fix.

Space station computers rebooted, partial power restored (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/14/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070614_sts117_staplerep_02.jpg)

This close-up view details how medical staples will be used to secure a loose thermal blanket on the space shuttle Atlantis during the STS-117 mission. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070614_sts117_omsdam_02.jpg)

A view of the damaged shuttle blanket on the Atlantis orbiter's left Orbital Manuevering System pod during the STS-117 mission. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070614_sts117_reillyeva_02.jpg)

STS-117 astronauts Jim Reilly and Danny Olivas (visible among Reilly's helmet reflections participate in their mission's first spacewalk. They will perform a shuttle blanket fix and help stow an ISS solar array on a June 15, 2007 spacewalk. Credit: NASA

Other space news:

Honey, the baby's spacewalking (http://www.cnn.com/2007/US/06/14/baby.monitor.space.ap/index.html)

European company unveils space plane (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/14/space.plane.ap/index.html)

Europe unveils space plane for tourist market. Plane will look like business jet with long wings and rocket engine  (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19211706/)

(http://msnbcmedia1.msn.com/j/msnbc/Components/Photos/070613/070613_eads_hmed2p.h2.jpg)

The space plane would take off from an as-yet undetermined spaceport using two conventional jet engines. The plane would climb to 7.5 miles (12 km) in altitude before its rocket engine ignites, powering the vehicle through a coast phase that would provide passengers with one and one-half minutes of near-zero-gravity experience.

Also check out the animation video clips of the Astrium space jet here (http://www.eads.com/1024/en/pressdb/pressdb/EADS%20Astrium/20070614_astrium_space_tourism.html) & here (http://www.astrium.eads.net/).

Now to come up with $199,000-$265,000.  :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on June 15, 2007, 09:27 AM


(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070614_sts117_reillyeva_02.jpg)



That picture is just amazing.

BTW, I saw on Nova that they now have the material with which to build the cable for the space elevator, and nano-carbon tube.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Angry Ewok on June 15, 2007, 01:25 PM
Amazing space walk photos... I've always wanted to go up there with some Shirley Bassey blasting.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 15, 2007, 07:13 PM
Spacewalker fixes shuttle blanket (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/15/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/180070main_Olivas_Blanket_Worksite.jpg)

John (Danny) Olivas is repairing the thermal blanket on Atlantis. Image credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 15, 2007, 08:15 PM


(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070614_sts117_reillyeva_02.jpg)

That picture is just amazing.

Yeah, a very impressive pic. Click on the small pic below for a high res pic of that shot, worth getting it framed.  8)

(http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-117/med/iss015e11870.jpg) (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-117/hires/iss015e11870.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 16, 2007, 05:28 PM
Shuttle cleared to land next week (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/16/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

HOUSTON -- NASA astronaut Sunita Williams set a new spaceflight record early Saturday as she and her Atlantis shuttle crewmates continue their mission to the International Space Station (ISS).

At precisely 1:47 a.m. EDT (0547 GMT), Williams took the all-time title for the longest spaceflight by a female astronaut as she passed the 188-day, four-hour mark in Earth orbit.

Williams' spaceflight surpassed that of fellow NASA astronaut Shannon Lucid, who spent just over 188 days in orbit during a 1996 mission to Russia's Mir Space Station. By coincidence, Williams set the new record on the 44th anniversary of the launch of the first female spaceflyer Valentina Tereshkova, a cosmonaut launched by the former Soviet Union in 1963. Credit: Space.com

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070616_sts117_williams_02.jpg)

Astronaut Sunita Williams, an STS-117 mission specialist and former Expedition 15 flight engineer, poses for a photo with two Russian Orlan spacesuits in the Pirs docking compartment of the International Space Station. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 18, 2007, 12:27 AM
Shuttle, space station 'slowly moving back' to normal (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/17/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070617_sts117_eva4_wide_02.jpg)

This view, taken by a camera mounted to the space shuttle Atlantis, shows STS-117 spacewalkers Patrick Forrester and Steven Swanson as they worked on the joint bridging the S3/4 trusses outside the International Space Station (ISS) on June 17, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070617_sts117_eva4swny_02.jpg)

STS-117 spacewalkers Steven Swanson and Patrick Forrester (partially visible at right) fly over a blue Earth while working on the new Starboard 3 (S3) truss outside the International Space Station on June 17, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070617_sts117_eva4arry_02.jpg)

Spacewalkers Patrick Forrester (left) and Steven Swanson work to free a massive joint that will allow new starboard solar arrays to rotate and track the Sun during a June 17, 2007 excursion outside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV.

Another high res clicky below.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/180042main_image_feature_848_ys_3.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/180044main_image_feature_848_ys_full.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 18, 2007, 08:14 PM
Space station computers get final test (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/18/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070613_iss_flare2_02.jpg)

An ISS flare caused by sunlight reflecting off the solar panels of the space station was captured by amateur astronomer Mike Tyrell as it passed over England Tuesday night. Credit: Mike Tyrrell.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/180276main_sts117exp15portrait_330.jpg)

The STS-117 and Expedition 15 crewmembers gather for a group portrait during a joint crew press conference in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station while Space Shuttle Atlantis was docked with the station. Image credit: NASA.

STS-117, Expedition 15 Close Hatches; Atlantis to Undock Tuesday. The STS-117 crew bid farewell today to the Expedition 15 crew before the hatches closed at 6:51 p.m. EDT between Space Shuttle Atlantis and the International Space Station. Attention now turns to Atlantis’ undocking from the station 10:42 a.m. Tuesday.

Atlantis is scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., at 1:54 EDT Thursday.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 19, 2007, 07:14 PM
Final inspection for space shuttle Atlantis  (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/19/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/061222_isspost116_02.jpg)

This view of the International Space Station, taken in December 2006 by STS-116 astronauts, shows how the station appeared prior to Atlantis' June 2007 STS-117 mission. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070619_sts117_postundck_02.jpg)

A camera aboard the space shuttle Atlantis returned this view of the International Space Station, backdropped by Earth, after the STS-117 crew undocked on June 19, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070618_sts117_farewell_02.jpg)

ISS Expedition 15 commander Fyodor Yurchikhin (left) shakes hands with Atlantis shuttle commander Rick Sturckow during a hatch closing ceremony on June 18, 2007 during NASA's STS-117 mission. Credit: AP PHOTO/NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070619_sts117_shuttle_02.jpg)

A camera mounted to the exterior of the International Space Station caught this view of the shuttle Atlantis after its June 19, 2007 undocking during NASA's STS-117 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 20, 2007, 09:02 PM
Atlantis crew awaits final inspection results (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/20/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

NASA Clears Space Shuttle Atlantis for Thursday Landing:

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA mission managers cleared the space shuttle Atlantis and its seven-astronaut crew for a planned Thursday landing after resolving two final issues.

Atlantis and its STS-117 astronaut crew are due to land on a runway here at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC) Thursday at 1:55 p.m. EDT (1755 GMT), though anticipated thunderstorms and thick clouds near the landing strip may preempt the orbiter's Earth return, mission managers said.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070620_sts117_issrear_02.jpg)

This view, taken by a camera aboard the space shuttle Atlantis, shows the International Space Station over the the orbiter's tail after the June 19, 2007 undocking of NASA's STS-117 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070619_sts117_shuttle_02.jpg)

A camera mounted to the exterior of the International Space Station caught this view of the shuttle Atlantis after its June 19, 2007 undocking during NASA's STS-117 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 21, 2007, 07:04 PM
Shuttle landing scrubbed for Thursday (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/21/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. -- NASA's shuttle Atlantis and its astronaut crew will have to wait at least one more day before returning to Earth after poor weather thwarted a planned Thursday landing.

Atlantis is now set to land Friday, with the first KSC opportunity at 2:18 p.m. EDT (1818 GMT).
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on June 22, 2007, 09:48 AM
I like it when the shuttle lands out this way (SoCal.) We always hear the sonic boom and feel the house shake, just a little.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 22, 2007, 07:08 PM
California it was, must be sweet watching her come home & hearing the sonic boom.

Shuttle completes mission in California (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/06/22/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070622_sts117_land_02.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis touches down at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. Credit: NASA TV.

Clicky on the high res pic below just taken before the drag chute deployed. Sweet!  8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/180841main_main.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/180842main_ED07-0137-02.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on June 23, 2007, 09:38 AM
Aghhh, I missed the sonic boom. I had a house full of kids. They canceled everything out. :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 8, 2007, 07:43 PM
Teacher-astronaut heads for space (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/08/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

Completing the Mission After 21 Years (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/main/campion_essay_070808.html)

(http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/gallery/images/shuttle/sts-118/med/jsc2007e13555.jpg)  (http://z.about.com/d/history1900s/1/7/8/W/challenger27.jpg)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070809_sts118_ntv_lnch_02.jpg)

NASA's space shuttle Endeavour launches into space on Aug. 8, 2007 on the STS-118 construction mission to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 9, 2007, 07:53 PM
Shuttle crew tackles inspection (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/09/space.shuttle.reut/index.html)

Here's something interesting to watch from filmmaker Ron Howard who brought us the amazing Apollo 13. This documentary film arrives in theater September 7th.  8)

In the Shadow of the Moon Site (http://www.intheshadowofthemoon.com/index.asp)

In the Shadow of the Moon Trailer (http://www.apple.com/trailers/thinkfilm/intheshadowofthemoon/trailer/)

Between 1968 and 1972, nine American spacecraft voyaged to the Moon, and 12 men walked upon its surface. IN THE SHADOW OF THE MOON brings together for the first, and possibly the last, time surviving crew members from every single Apollo mission that flew to the Moon along with visually stunning archival material re-mastered from the original NASA film footage. The result is an intimate epic that vividly communicates the daring, the danger, the pride, and the promise of this extraordinary era in history when the whole world literally looked up at America.

(http://www.toxicshock.tv/news/wp-content/uploads/in_the_shadow_of_the_moon_poster.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 9, 2007, 08:36 PM
1 more thing to add, it's meteor shower time.

Perseid will prepare you for the bigger shooting-star show, Aurigid (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/20198281/)

Spectacular Meteor Shower Possible for 2007 (http://www.space.com/spacewatch/060817_meteor_shower.html)

Saturday I will out of town that night so hopefully the skies are clear, being away from the city lights it should be a good show. As for Sept, I'll be backpacking in the moutains & hopefully the weather will be good. The stars are much better in the mountains.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on August 10, 2007, 09:45 AM
Another New Planet (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/09/exoplanet.discovery.ap/index.html?iref=newssearch) was found. It's the largest so far.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 10, 2007, 07:42 PM
Endeavour docks with space station (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/10/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070810_sts118_backflip_02.jpg)

Cameras mounted to the exterior of the International Space Station (ISS) returned this view of the shuttle Endeavour during the orbiter's backflip to allow photgraphy of its belly-mounted tiles. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070810_sts118_issarriveB_02.jpg)

This view, taken by a exterior camera aboard the International Space Station, shows the space shuttle Endeavour docked at the tip of the U.S. Destiny module on Aug. 10, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.

3-inch gouge found on space shuttle's belly (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/10/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 11, 2007, 07:58 PM
Astronauts add beam to space station, complete spacewalk (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/11/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/185688main_4-2007-08-11_120747.jpg)

Image above: Mission Specialist Rick Mastracchio participates in the first spacewalk of the STS-118 mission. Image: NASA TV.

Space Hotel Slated to Open in 2012 (http://www.space.com/news/070811_space_hotel.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 12, 2007, 12:39 AM
Fuel tank foam damaged shuttle heat shield, NASA says.

HOUSTON -- A chunk of foam insulation, not ice, damaged the protective belly-mounted tiles of NASA's space shuttle Endeavour during its launch earlier this week, mission managers said late Saturday.

Video recorded by cameras on Endeavour's twin solid rocket boosters during its Aug. 8 launch caught a grapefruit-sized piece of fuel tank foam as it gouged a 3-inch square (19 square centimeter) gash into heat-resistant tiles on the orbiter's undercarriage, said John Shannon, chair of NASA's shuttle mission management team.

"We feel like we have the culprit," Shannon said in a mission briefing here at NASA's Johnson Space Center. "I think we have conclusively shown where the piece of foam came from."

The foam piece fell from a lower bracket attaching a 17-inch (43-centimeter) liquid oxygen feed line to Endeavour's fuel tank about 58 seconds after liftoff, then bounced off a metal strut to bite into two of the black ceramic tiles near the shuttle's rear right landing gear door. In addition to the gouge, the foam debris caused a series of other scuffs aft of the initial impact, Shannon said.

"It was bad luck because we got a bad bounce off this [external tank] strut," he added.

Because the debris appears to be primarily made up of foam, and not denser ice as originally thought, mission managers are more confident that the damage inflicted is not be severe enough to require a spacewalk repair. But Shannon said Endeavour's astronaut crew will conduct an in-depth inspection of the tile damage Sunday to be sure.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070810_tile2_02.jpg)

A view of damage to heat-resistant tiles on the underside of the space shuttle Endeavour, 4 feet (1.2 meters) from the starboard landing gear door. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070811_tank_foam_02.jpg)

A view of the area where a grapefruit-sized chunk of foam that damaged space shuttle Endeavour's heat-resistant underbelly is believed to have originated. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070811_shuttle_damage_02.jpg)

This image depicts tile damage to the space shuttle Endeavour during its Aug. 8, 2007 launch, as well as its location near the starboard landing gear door. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/185488main_image_feature_ys_888_4.jpg)

This is one of a series of images of different areas of Space Shuttle Endeavour as it approached the International Space Station and performed a back-flip to accommodate close scrutiny. This image shows Endeavour's nose cone and surrounding area. Image credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on August 12, 2007, 09:30 AM
Amazing stuff. You know, now that they're factoring in tile repair on flights, for some reason I just image Astronauts sitting up there with a tile cutter, cutting tiles to size for replacement. :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Smartypants1635 on August 12, 2007, 12:20 PM
So who watched the shower last night, I saw a bit of it, but it wasn't very active, maybe one every 4-5 minutes :-\ The Weather guy on the news said it will be more active tonight in our area though. :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 12, 2007, 02:41 PM
I only saw a few late last night, they were about 5 min apart. Hopefully tonght which is the peak will produce more but up here we will have clouds so very unlikely I will see any.  :-\

NASA gives shuttle's underside a close look (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/12/shuttle.inspection.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070812_sts118_boom_02.jpg)

The shuttle Endeavour's robotic arm is moved into position for an Aug. 12, 2007 focused inspection of heat-resistant tile damage during NASA's STS-118 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070812_sts118_tiledmg_02.jpg)

This image taken from NASA TV shows the largest area of tile damage, a 3.5-inch by 2-inch gouge, in tiles inspected on the underbelly of the shuttle Endeavour on Aug. 12, 2007 during the STS-118 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Smartypants1635 on August 12, 2007, 08:42 PM
So DSJ, The shower on the 1st. Is it friday night the 31st to the 1st in the early morning, or is it the night of the 1st early morning of the second?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 12, 2007, 08:57 PM
The Aurigid shower, will be mainly visible just before dawn and only here on the west coast and in Hawaii. This is a very concentrated meteor shower with a predicted peak on Saturday morning September first at 4:37 am PDT. These meteors also will stream in from the northeast and the Aurigids are most noted for their long yellow trails. Unfortunately this year the moon will be up, so the sky will not be quite dark. There are some predictions that this year, at the peak of the shower (between 4 and 5 am PDT), there could be a burst of Aurigid meteors.

Strange Lights: The 2007 Aurigid Meteor Shower (http://science.nasa.gov/headlines/y2007/08aug_aurigids.htm)

Perseids Provide Practice for September Shower (http://www.space.com/searchforlife/070809_seti_aurigids.html)

Best Perseid rates for U.S. observers are in the early morning hours of Sunday. That night, we will deploy on a privately owned Gulfstream GV aircraft to observe the Perseid shower from altitude, to practise observing for the Aurigid shower later that month. Twelve scientists are participating in the test flight, with a range of cameras and video camcorders. Each camera uniquely suited to measure the rate of the meteors, their colors, how they break during impact, and how deep they penetrate in the atmosphere.

The Aurigid shower will last only an hour and a half, with a bright Moon in the sky.

Looks like no meteor show for me tonight, it's cloudy right now & me thinks it going to stay like that.  :'(

Guess that next shot for me will be in Sept, I hope the weather is good in the mountains. The stars are awesome in that darkness.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Smartypants1635 on August 12, 2007, 09:51 PM
When they say west coast they mean west coast west coast, none of the rockies?? :'( Or do we still have a chance to see part of it. :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 12, 2007, 10:05 PM
The outburst is best seen from the western United States, including California, Oregon, Alaska, and Hawaii. The figure below shows the moment of civil twilight for two different times, at the onset of the shower and towards the end. In San Francisco, the peak out the outburst is at 4:36 a.m. Pacific Daylight Time, while the beginning of civil twilight is at 6:13 a.m. PDT.

(http://aurigid.seti.org/Earthbeginend2.jpg)

The shower will be visible by the naked eye from the western United States, especially in California, Hawaii, Alaska, other western states and from Mexico and the western provinces of Canada.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Smartypants1635 on August 12, 2007, 10:40 PM
Ok, So I'm guessing thats a yes. :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 12, 2007, 10:50 PM
Yup.  :-*
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 13, 2007, 07:11 PM
Spacewalkers repair station gyroscope (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/13/shuttle.inspection.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070813_sts118_eva2wrp_02.jpg)

STS-118 spacewalker Dave Williams prepares a new gyroscope for installation at the International Space Station during an Aug. 13, 2007 spacewalk. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070813_sts118_eva2cmg_02.jpg)

STS-118 spacewalker Dave Williams, a Canadian Space Agency astronaut, carries a new ISS gyroscope out of the shuttle Endeavour's payload bay during an Aug. 13, 2007 spacewalk. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070813_sts118_oldgyro_02.jpg)

A broken gyroscope sits perched on a bracket (right) while STS-118 spacewalkers prepare to install a new one at the International Space Station during an Aug. 13, 2007 excursion. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070812_sts118_tileinspct_02.jpg)

This image of the gouge to heat shield tiles on the space shuttle Endeavour was taken Aug. 12, 2007 using a camera on an extension boom during a focused inspection by the orbiter's crew. Credit: NASA.

China reveals astronaut's brush with death (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/13/china.astronaut.reut/index.html)

Did anyone catch any meteors last night, way too cloudy up here last night for me.  :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 14, 2007, 08:47 PM
Astronaut teacher wows students from space (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/14/shuttle.inspection.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070814_sts118_morgan_kids_02.jpg)

Clockwise from left are STS-118 mission specialists Dave Williams, Barbara Morgan and Alvin Drew and Expedition 15 Flight Engineer Clay Anderson. The astronauts participated in an educational event with students asking questions from the Discovery Center in Boise, Idaho. Credit: NASA.

NASA inks deal for Shuttle replacements (http://www.theregister.co.uk/2007/08/13/shuttle_replacement_deal_inked/)

(http://www.daviddarling.info/images/Ares_launch_vehicles.jpg)

Ares V (left) and Ares I rockets.

(http://www.daviddarling.info/images/Ares_Shuttle_Saturn_comparison.jpg)

(http://images.spaceref.com/news/2006/ares.1.chart.jpg)

(http://images.spaceref.com/news/2006/ares.v.chart.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 14, 2007, 10:14 PM
The Moderate Resolution Imaging Spectroradiometer (MODIS) on NASA's Aqua satellite captured this image of Hurricane Flossie on August 13 at 23:10 UTC (1:10 p.m. HST), as it swirled in the Pacific Ocean, approaching Hawaii. Clicky pic for a HQ view.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/186070main1_flossie_0814_modis_350px_la.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/186069main_flossie_0814_modis_full.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on August 14, 2007, 10:42 PM
Anybody catch the PBS special tonight on planets/possible life/evolution?? 

Spectacular!!

I haven't watched this channel since I was a kid, but my remote got locked on it tonight for some reason and I was completely glued to the tube + there was absolutely no commercials.  I love bouncing boobs and all, but I've seen far better lights in the sky..
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 15, 2007, 07:43 PM
I taped NOVA last night & will be watching it later on, looks interesting.

Ripped glove brings spacewalk to early end (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/15/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070815_sts118_eva3arm_02.jpg)

NASA astronaut Rick Mastracchio rides the International Space Station's robotic arm in an Aug. 15, 2007 spacewalk during NASA's STS-118 mission. The spacewalk ended about two hours early due to glove damage on Mastracchio's spacesuit. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070815_sts118_eva3_02.jpg)

Cameras outside the International Space Station show astronauts Rick Mastracchio (bottom) and Clayton Anderson during an Aug. 15, 2007 spacewalk as they prepare the station for later construction activities. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070815_sts118_eva3wrp_02.jpg)

Expedition 15 Flight Engineer Clay Anderson holds a Crew Equipment Translation Aid cart as he rides on the end of the International Space Station's robotic arm during STS-118's third spacewalk on Aug. 15, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070815_sts118_astroglove_02.jpg)

Highlighted in this picture is an abrasion of Mission Specialist Rick Mastracchio's glove during STS-118's third spacewalk. Image: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 16, 2007, 06:59 PM
NASA debates fixing shuttle gouge  (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/16/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070812_sts118_tileinspct_02.jpg)

This image of the gouge to heat shield tiles on the space shuttle Endeavour was taken Aug. 12, 2007 using a camera on an extension boom during a focused inspection by the orbiter's crew. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070815_sts118_arcjetile_02.jpg)

This view of a tile damage test at NASA's arcjet facility displays anticipated additional damage an unrepaired gouge could lead to. While dramatic in appearance, the downstream tile 'tunneling' does not exceed safety margins, NASA said. Credit: NASA.

Comet-like star streaks through Milky Way (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/16/star.tail.reut/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 17, 2007, 07:16 PM
Astronauts '100 percent' behind skipping repairs (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/17/space.shuttle.ap/index.html#cnnSTCText)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070811_shuttle_damage_02.jpg)

This image depicts tile damage to the space shuttle Endeavour during its Aug. 8, 2007 launch, as well as its location near the starboard landing gear door. Credit: NASA

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070816_sts118_fd9_02.jpg)

Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, Space Shuttle Endeavour's orbital maneuvering system (OMS) pods and vertical stabilizer are featured in this image photographed by a crewmember while docked with the International Space Station during STS-118 flight day six activities in August 2007. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 18, 2007, 03:09 PM
Storm shortens shuttle spacewalk (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/18/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/186820main_Hurricane_Dean.jpg)

Hurricane Dean swirls in the Caribbean Sea as Space Shuttle Endeavour and the International Space Station pass overhead during STS-118's fourth spacewalk. Image: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070818_sts118_preeva4_02.jpg)

Astronaut Dave Williams, STS-118 mission specialist representing the Canadian Space Agency, participates in the mission's second planned session of spacewalk outside the International Space Station on Aug. 13, 2007. Credit: NASA
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 19, 2007, 05:07 PM
Endeavour heads home early as NASA eyes hurricane (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/19/shuttle.undock.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/185688main_dean.jpg)

A still photo close-up of the eye of Category 4 Hurricane Dean. Crew members on the Space Shuttle Endeavour captured this image around 1 p.m. EDT Saturday of Hurricane Dean in the Caribbean. Image: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070819_sts118_preundock_02.jpg)

Backdropped by a blue and white Earth and the blackness of space, NASA's space shuttle Endeavour, docked to the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station, is featured in this image photographed by a crewmember during the STS-118 mission's third spacewalk on Aug. 15, 2007. Credit: NASA
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 20, 2007, 07:12 PM
Crew prepares shuttle for early landing (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/20/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070820_sts118_shuttle_02.jpg)

Backdropped by the blackness of space and Earth's horizon, the space shuttle Endeavour is shown on Aug. 13, 2007 before leaving the International Space Station six days later. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070819_sts118_undock_02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour appears in a camera view from the International Space Station (ISS) during undocking on Aug. 19, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.

Endeavour’s first landing opportunity on Tuesday is at 12:32 p.m. EDT at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., with the deorbit burn occurring at 11:25 a.m. A second opportunity is available at the Florida spaceport at 2:06 p.m. The deorbit burn would occur at 1 p.m.

Edwards Air Force Base in California and the White Sands Space Harbor in New Mexico will not be activated Tuesday as possible landing sites.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: stormie on August 21, 2007, 12:34 PM
...and the Shuttle landed safely.  :)

When I read about another chunk of tile flaking off during the launch this time, I couldn't help but feel dread. Glad to know all the crew are safely home.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 21, 2007, 07:24 PM
I happened to catch the landing at work, great stuff. I liked the view of the landing strip from the cockpit, 

Shuttle lands safely in Florida (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/08/21/space.shuttle/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/187363main_sts118landingcrew-web.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/187270main_07pd2298.jpg)

Space Shuttle Endeavour landed Aug. 21, 2007, at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The perfect landing capped a construction and supply mission to the International Space Station. Image: NASA/Chuck Tintera.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/187277main_image_feature_896_ys_4.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/187278main_image_feature_896_ys_full.jpg)

The opening drag chute slowed Endeavour as it landed on runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The Endeavour crew, led by Commander Scott Kelly, completed a 13-day mission to the International Space Station. The STS-118 mission began Aug. 8 and installed a new gyroscope, an external spare parts platform and another truss segment to the expanding station. Endeavour's main gear touched down at 12:32 EDT, on Aug. 21, 2007, after traveling more than 5 million miles. Image credit: NASA/George Shelton.

Clicky on the 2 pics above for a Hi-Res view.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth Kenobi on August 28, 2007, 09:27 AM
NASA is going to toss Luke Skywalker's Lightsaber (http://cbs2.com/topstories/topstories_story_240084205.html) into space when Discovery lunches in October. 
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on August 28, 2007, 09:34 AM
I just caught the new launch vehicle replacement plans. It's hard to believe. Seems like a major step backwards. :(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 28, 2007, 07:14 PM
NASA is going to toss Luke Skywalker's Lightsaber (http://cbs2.com/topstories/topstories_story_240084205.html) into space when Discovery lunches in October. 

Ha... ha!  :D

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/de/Time_(Simpsons).jpg)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070828_sts120_lightsaber_02.jpg)

The original lightsaber used by Luke Skywalker in the film 'Star Wars' will fly to the real space station on shuttle Discovery's STS-120 mission in October. Credit: Master Replicas/NASA.


Yeah, hard to believe we are basically going back to the Apollo design.   :-\

CONTRACT RELEASE: C07-40

NASA Selects Ares I Upper Stage Production Contractor

WASHINGTON - NASA on Tuesday selected The Boeing Co., Huntsville, Ala., as the contractor to provide manufacturing support for design and construction of the upper stage of the Ares I rocket. Ares I will launch astronauts to the International Space Station and eventually help return humans to the moon.

Boeing will provide support to a NASA-led design team during the design phase and will be responsible for production of the Ares I upper stage. Boeing will manufacture a ground test article, three flight test units and six production flight units to support NASA's flight manifest through 2016. Final assembly of the upper stage will take place at NASA's Michoud Assembly Facility in New Orleans.

The contract type is cost-plus-award-fee and the period of performance is Sept. 1, 2007, through Dec. 31, 2016. The estimated contract value for design team support and the manufacture of the test units and six production flight units is $514.7 million. The selection resulted from a full and open competition.

Ares I is an in-line, two-stage rocket that will carry to low Earth orbit the crew exploration vehicle Orion, which will succeed the space shuttle as NASA’s primary vehicle for human exploration in the next decade. The Ares I upper stage, with an engine and an avionics unit procured separately, will provide the navigation, guidance, control and propulsion required for the second stage of the rocket's ascent. The Ares I first stage will consist of a five-segment solid rocket booster and motor similar to those used on the space shuttle. The second, or upper, stage will consist of a J-2X main engine, a fuel tank for liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen propellants, and associated avionics.

The Ares I upper stage development is managed by NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., for NASA’s Constellation Program.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/188057main_20070828_ares1_01_516.jpg)

(left to right) Brewster Shaw, vice President and general Manager for Boeing Space Operations, Doug Cooke, NASA deputy associate administrator, Exploration Systems, Danny Davis, NASA Ares I upper stage element manager, Steve Cook, NASA Ares Project manager and Jeff Hanley, NASA Constellation Program manager, pose for a photo in front of a model of an Ares I rocket. NASA announced Tuesday, August 28, 2007, the Boeing Co., Huntsville, Ala., as the contractor to provide manufacturing support for design and construction of the upper stage of the Ares I rocket. Ares I will launch astronauts to the International Space Station and eventually help return humans to the moon. Image credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 28, 2007, 10:33 PM
Photo gallery: Lightsaber lands in Houston (http://www.collectspace.com/news/news-082807a.html)  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 28, 2007, 10:56 PM
We have video of Chewbacca giving NASA the lightsaber at Oakland airport (http://cbs5.com/local/local_story_240173031.html).

More pictures of the NASA Lightsaber Event (http://flickr.com/photos/starwarsblog/sets/72157601730875153/).

(http://farm2.static.flickr.com/1427/1260308707_41da05bfc0.jpg?v=0)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jayson on August 28, 2007, 11:12 PM
Hmmm... Space.com "advertises" that it is Mark Hamill's lightsaber from 1977's Star Wars yet that is clearly his ROTJ hilt.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 28, 2007, 11:21 PM
collectspace.com has this to say...

(http://www.collectspace.com/images/news-082707b.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on August 29, 2007, 09:34 AM
Inanimate carbon rod needs to go too. :(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 18, 2007, 09:31 AM
Here's a cool little article about some Extra Solar Planets (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19588333/)

I just watched a PBS show about amateur astronomers who build their own telescopes. Turns out, a lot of these amateurs are the ones who are discovering the extra-solar planets by measuring changes in light density as the the planet crosses in front of the star.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 19, 2007, 07:51 PM
Do you have what it takes? Do you have the Right stuff? Then come on down & apply to be the best of the best. The U.S. space agency announced Tuesday that it is accepting applications for its 2009 Astronaut Candidate Class.

Help Wanted: Astronauts (http://www.nasa.gov/astronauts/recruit.html)

NASA Begins Hunt for New Astronauts (http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20070918/sc_space/nasabeginshuntfornewastronauts)

Astronaut Candidate (http://jobsearch.usajobs.opm.gov/getjob.asp?JobID=62398554&AVSDM=2007%2D09%2D18+00%3A00%3A04&Logo=0&sort=rv&vw=d&brd=3876&ss=0&customapplicant=15513,15514,15515,15669,15523,15512,15516,45575&q=astronaut)

Salary: 59,493.00 - 130,257.00 USD per year. This announcement is open to all qualified U.S citizens.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 11, 2007, 01:22 AM
From Space.com

Almost one month after Japan's successful launch of the Kaguya lunar probe, the unmanned observatory has begun its first major activities in orbit around the moon.

In addition to snapping its first lunar images, the probe jettisoned one of two 110-pound (50-kilogram) "baby" satellites that will help create a detailed gravity map of the moon.

The separation of the miniature satellite, called Rstar, occurred on Oct. 8 at 8:36 p.m. EDT (0036 GMT Oct. 9). Mission managers expect Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kaguya to jettison its second 3.3-foot-diameter (1-meter-diameter) mini-satellite called VRAD on Oct. 14.

The 55 billion yen ($480 million) Kaguya spacecraft, formally known as the SELenological and ENgineering Explorer (SELENE), is named after a moon princess in Japanese folklore. The spacecraft successfully was launched on Sept. 14 from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan and entered lunar orbit on Oct. 5.

Kaguya will conduct detailed studies of the moon using 14 different science instruments from a height of about 62 miles (100 kilometers) above the lunar surface during its mission. Japanese engineers and scientists designed the spacecraft to produce high-resolution surface and gravity maps, observe the moon's magnetic fields and even search for water ice, among other science objectives, during the one-year mission.

China plans to launch the next moon-bound spacecraft, called the Chang'e-1, by the end of the year, followed by NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter and India's Chandrayaan-1 spacecraft in 2008.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071009-kaguya-photo-02.jpg)

A photo from Japan's Kaguya/SELENE moon probe shortly after jettisoning one of two mini-satellites. The western rim Oceanus Procellarum is clearly visible in the image, which was taken on Oct. 5 about 497 miles (800 kilometers) from the Moon. Credit: JAXA

Russian rocket launches first Malaysian into space (http://uk.reuters.com/article/wtMostRead/idUKL1016094020071010)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071010-exp16-launch-02.jpg)

A Russian Soyuz rocket launches the Expedition 16 crew and Malaysia's first astronaut toward the International Space Station on Oct. 10, 2007 from Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA TV.

Shuttle may face launch delay (http://www.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/idUSN1026567020071011)

Space shuttle wing leading edge issue assessed (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts120/071010rcc/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 20, 2007, 07:36 PM
A little catch me up on what's going on in space.

New crew arrives at ISS on Oct 12th.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071010-exp16-soyuz-02.jpg)

NASA astronaut Peggy Whitson, Expedition 16 commander, is seen via cameras inside her Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft during an Oct. 10, 2007 launch to the International Space Station. At bottom left is Expedition 16 flight engineer Yuri Malenchenko, with Malaysian astronaut Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor out of frame. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071012-exp16-soyuztma11-02.jpg)

A Russian Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft ferries Malaysian astronaut Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor and the new Expedition 16 crew to the International Space Station on Oct. 12, 2007. Exterior cameras on the station caught this view of the incoming spacecraft. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071012-exp16-dock-02.jpg)

Fighter spaceships of 'Star Wars.' Rendezvous cameras aboard a Russian Soyuz TMA-11 spacecraft caught this view before it ferried the Expedition 16 crew to the ISS on Oct. 12, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071020-exp15-exp16-02.jpg)

Space staion crew to return Sunday, their space station departure will set the stage for a busy few weeks aboard the ISS, beginning with the planned Tuesday launch of NASA's shuttle Discovery to deliver a vital connecting node to the orbital node. The 14-day construction flight will lay the foundation for future international laboratories at the ISS.

The crewmembers onboard the International Space Station pose for a group photo in the Destiny laboratory of the International Space Station. From the left (front row) are: Expedition 15 flight engineer Oleg Kotov and commander Fyodor NYurchikhin; and Malaysian astronaut Sheikh Muszaphar Shukor. From the left (back row) are: Expedition 16 flight engineer Yuri Malenchenko, commander Peggy Whitson; Expedition 15/16 flight engineer Clay Anderson. Credit: NASA.

China wants role in space station (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/16/china.space.ap/index.html)

Mars rovers to go at least 2 more years (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/16/mars.rovers.ap/index.html)

Man, those rovers just keep going & going...  8)

Shuttle cleared for launch despite wing concerns (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/17/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

Drinking report casts shadow over shuttle crew (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/19/drinking.astronauts.ap/index.html#cnnSTCText)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/191130main_8-harddown-m.jpg)

Space Shuttle Discovery was secured on Launch Pad 39A after a nearly 7 hour journey on the crawlerway and was hard down at 1:15 p.m. EDT, Sept. 30. A banner at the launch pad proclaims the sentiments of the work force at Kennedy Space Center. Photo credit: NASA/George Shelton

Jeff also reminds us that Luke's lightsaber is ready for take-off as reported on JD's front page.

Quote
Luke Skywalker's Jedi Lightsaber from Return of the Jedi has been stowed aboard the space shuttle Discovery and is ready for the big trip into space with the seven STS-120 astronauts. The shuttle is scheduled for lift-off on October 23rd at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Check out the Official Site (http://www.starwars.com/community/news/media/news20071018.html#hljs) for all the details.

(http://www.starwars.com/community/news/media/img/20071018_1_bg.jpg)

Astronaut Jim Reilly accepts Luke Skywalker's Jedi lightsaber from R2-D2 on NASA's behalf at Kennedy Space Center.

(http://www.starwars.com/community/news/media/img/20071018_2_bg.jpg)

The Jedi lightsaber, which appeared in Return of the Jedi, will also make its way back to NASA's Space Center Houston once Discovery returns to Earth. "The Jedi lightsaber will have traveled more than six million miles in space after this mission," says Roger Bornstein, Marketing Director for Space Center Houston. "And we'll have the honor of displaying this flown movie artifact once it returns." The Jedi lightsaber will be part of a new exhibit at Space Center Houston that will showcase a small collection of famous Star Wars movie props and a full-size X-wing starfighter through Jan. 1.

Also take note, during the two-week mission, Star Wars fans will be able to leave their best wishes to the space shuttle astronauts at http://spacecenter.org/message.asp

(http://spacecenter.org/images/StarWarsLuke2.jpg)

Luke Skywalker's Jedi lightsaber has been carefully stowed aboard space shuttle Discovery and will travel to the International Space Station before returning to Earth 14 days (and six million miles) later. Help mark this historic event by leaving a message of support for the the seven STS-120 astronauts.

Your message to the space shuttle crew will be collected online and placed onto a CD, which will be presented to the astronauts at the official public debriefing at NASA's Space Center Houston after their return.

Show your appreciation & leave a message.  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 21, 2007, 07:58 PM
Soyuz Craft Lands Safely in Kazakhstan 200 miles off course (http://www.abcnews.go.com/Technology/wireStory?id=3756666)

(http://www.itar-tass.com/img/news_img_11989962_0006.jpg)

Discovery's "Go" for Tuesday Launch  (http://in.reuters.com/article/worldNews/idINIndia-30092220071021)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 22, 2007, 09:16 PM
Weather Forecast Dips For Tuesday Shuttle Launch (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/071022-sts120-update.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071016-sts120-pad-02.jpg)

NASA's space shuttle Discovery stands poised for a planned Oct. 23, 2007 flight at Launch Pad 39A of the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Credit: NASA/George Shelton.

Women will call the shots during shuttle mission (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/22/space.shuttle.women.ap/index.html)

China to launch lunar probe this week (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/22/china.lunar.probe.ap/index.html)

Fossett unlikely to become next Amelia Earhart (http://news.rgj.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20071021/NEWS/710210340/1321)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: hansolo_506 on October 23, 2007, 07:20 AM
Yesterday, as part of my job, I was covering a news conference / q&a between Clay Anderson onboard the ISS and students from 6th grade through college senior at his alma mater, Hastings College in Hastings, Nebraska.  Even though I am an old dude, it was still cool.  I began my fascination with space at a very very early age and it was great watching him answer questions standing upside down or even doing that old "eating a glob of juice in midair" trick.

...and at the end of the interview, I got a free Expedition 15 Mission Patch.  Cool.  Looking forward to get a one-on-one interview with Anderson next March when he comes to Nebraska to recieve the "Pioneer Award".  After all, he IS the first astronaut from our state.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 23, 2007, 07:45 PM
Cool, Q&A on the ISS & a patch to boot. Sweet!  8)

Discovery rockets to space (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/23/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071023-sts120-launch1-02.jpg)

NASA's space shuttle Discovery, carrying the STS-120 astronaut crew, blasts off of launch Pad 39-A Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fla. on its journey into orbit around Earth. Mission managers expect Discovery to meet with the International Space Station on Oct. 25. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071023-sts120-launch2-02.jpg)

NASA's space shuttle Discovery finishes a 180-degree flip after successfully blasting off from launch Pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center at Cape Canaveral, Fla. Credit: NASA TV.

Damn high HQ pic.  8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/170421main_sts120launch1-web.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/170419main_sts120launch1.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery leaps from its launch pad Tuesday morning to start STS-120. Photo courtesy of Reuters/Scott Audette.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt on October 24, 2007, 02:54 AM
George Lucas "Uses Force" Helps Space Shuttle Launch On Time (http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2007/10/george-lucas-us.html)

Quote
Wahoo! Space Shuttle Discovery is on its way to the International Space Station under the Command of Pamela Melroy, a veteran Shuttle pilot. The anti-rain dancing paid off (or was it George Lucas in the audience waving off the clouds?) with Discovery lifting off at its appointed 11:38 am Eastern launch time.

Coincidence?  I think not.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 24, 2007, 07:07 PM
Astronauts check Discovery's heat shield (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/24/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071024-sts120-inspect-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery's robotic arm with the attached boom extension is moved into position shortly after completion of the heat shield inspection on Oct. 24, 2007. Discovery's STS-120 crew launched toward the ISS a day earlier. Credit: NASA.

Chinese rocket blasts off to moon (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/24/china.lunar.probe.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071024-china-moonB-02.jpg)

In this photo released by China's official Xinhua news agency, China's first moon orbiter Chang'e 1 lifts off from the launch pad at the Xichang Satellite Launch Center in southwest China's Sichuan province, on Wednesday October 24, 2007. Credit: AP Photo/Xinhua, Li Gang.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 25, 2007, 07:35 PM
Shuttle docks with space station (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/25/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071025-sts120-flip-02.jpg)

The shuttle Discovery performed an orbital backflip before docking at the International Space Station on Oct. 25, 2007 to expose its belly-mounted heat shield tile (shown in this ISS camera view) for a photo inspection by the station's Expedition 16 crew. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071025-sts120-discovery-02.jpg)

A cameditera mounted to the exterior of the International Space Station caught this view of the shuttle Discovery before its Oct. 25, 2007 docking. The cylindrical Harmony connecting node is clearly visible and will be installed during the shuttle's STS-120 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071025-sts120-dock-02.jpg)

This view from the centerline camera inside the shuttle Discovery's docking mechanism shows the International Space Station (ISS) on Oct. 25, 2007 as the two spacecraft prepared to dock with one another. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071025-sts120-dock2-02.jpg)

STS-120 commander Pamela Melroy, NASA's second female shuttle commander, guides Discovery in to an Oct. 25, 2007 docking at the International Space Station (ISS), where Peggy Whitson - the station's first female commander - and her crew awaited the orbiter's arrival. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 26, 2007, 06:55 PM
Spacewalkers attach Harmony module to station (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/26/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071026-sts120eva1-sasa-02.jpg)

Spacewalkers Scott Parazynski (left with red stripes) and Douglas Wheelock attach a broken space station antenna to the shuttle Discovery's payload bay for return to Earth during an Oct. 26, 2007 spacewalk. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071026-sts120eva1-wheels-02.jpg)

STS-120 mission specialist Doug Wheelock, toting a broken ISS antenna, rides the station's robotic arm into Discovery's payload bay during his first spacewalk on Oct. 26, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071026-sts120eva1-node2-02.jpg)

The Italian-built Harmony module is delivered to the International Space Station (ISS) during an Oct. 26, 2007 spacewalk, the first of five planned for NASA's STS-120 mission to the orbital laboratory. Harmony is the hub for future international labs at the ISS. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 27, 2007, 07:45 PM
Space station crew movin' on up (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/27/shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071027-sts120-harmonyB-02.jpg)

The Harmony module is shown attached to the International Space Station on Oct. 23, 2007. At bottom is the the shuttle Discovery docked to the Destiny lab. Harmony extends to the left from the Unity node atop Destiny. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071027-sts120-harmonyE-02.jpg)

Astronauts Peggy Whitson (left) and Paolo Nespoli enter the Harmony module for the first time. They are wearing goggles and masks to avoid contact with possible floating debris in the new module. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071027-sts120-node2astro-02.jpg)

Shuttle Discovery and Expedition 16 astronauts talk with reporters from inside the new Harmony node aboard the International Space Station (ISS) on Oct. 27, 2007, after the module was opened earlier in the day. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 28, 2007, 09:39 PM
Sign of damage seen in space station solar panel gear (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/28/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071028-sts120-eva2sarj-02.jpg)

Expedition 16 astronaut Daniel Tani uses a pistol grip tool to remove the outer cover of a large starboard joint during an inspection to find the source of vibrations from the truss segment on an Oct. 28, 2007 spacewalk outside the International Space Station. This view is from his helmet camera. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071028-sts120-p6-02.jpg)

The Port 6 solar array truss is hauled from its former perch of seven years atop the International Space Station during an Oct. 28, 2007 spacewalk during NASA's STS-120 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071028-sts120-eva2start-02.jpg)

STS-120 spacewalker Scott Parazynski and Expedition 16 flight engineer Daniel Tani exit the Quest airlock to begin the second spacewalk of their joint mission on Oct. 28, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 29, 2007, 09:18 PM
Astronauts perform critical construction job (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/29/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071029-sts120-shavings-02.jpg)

A close-up of metallic shavings recovered from the starboard-side solar alpha rotary joint, or SARJ, during an STS-120 space shuttle mission EVA. NASA mission managers said the filings are magnetic, indicating that the paddle-like joint could be damaged. Credit: NASA/collectSPACE.com

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071029-sts120-handoff-02.jpg)

The massive, 17.5-ton Port 6 solar array truss (right) sits perched at the tip of the shuttle Discovery's robotic arm after being handed off from the International Space Station's own arm on Oct. 29, 2007 during NASA's STS-120 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

NASA extends shuttle mission (http://uk.reuters.com/article/wtMostRead/idUKN2540649020071029)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 30, 2007, 07:08 PM
NASA wrestles ripped solar panel (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/30/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071030-sts120-port-sarj-2-02.jpg)

Spacewalker Scott Parazynski's view of the solar alpha rotary joint, or SARJ, on the port-side truss of the space station during an Oct. 30, 2007 excursion. He described the component as looking "brand new" compared to the starboard truss, which is littered with metallic grit. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071030-sts120-eva3-02.jpg)

A view from a window inside the docked Discovery shuttle-International Space Station stack during an Oct. 30, 2007 spacewalk. STS-120 spacewalkers Scott Parazynski and Doug Wheelock helped reattached the Port 6 truss, which still has its twin solar arrays stowed in this image. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071030-sts120-solar-tear-02.jpg)

A tear occurred in one of the International Space Station's (ISS) solar array wings during unfurling on Oct. 30, 2007. STS-120 astronauts George Zamka and Stephanie Wilson discovered the tear, but IS commander Peggy Whitson called for the halt to the unfurling operation started by mission control at Johnson Space Center. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 31, 2007, 08:30 PM
Space station troubles delay spacewalks (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/10/31/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071031-iss-tornarray-02.jpg)

A view of a damaged Port 6 4B solar array wing on the International Space Station after its Oct. 30, 2007 redeployment by the STS-120 shuttle Discovery crew. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071031-iss-tornarrayC-close-02.jpg)

These images show the location the solar array tear on the International Space Station's Port 6 solar wing. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 1, 2007, 08:04 PM
NASA plans spacewalk to fix ripped solar wing (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/11/01/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071031-iss-tornarrayC-close-02.jpg)

These images show the location the solar array tear on the International Space Station's Port 6 solar wing. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071101-sts120-parazynski-02.jpg)

STS-120 astronaut Scott Parazynski will venture into space during the fourth of up to five planned space walks for space shuttle Discovery's mission. Doug Wheelock will assist Parazynski in repairing damage to a port-side solar array wing. Credit: NASA/NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071101-arrayfix-position-02.jpg)

This NASA graphic depicts one possible position for spacewalker Scott Parazynski, shown perched at the end of a shuttle boom grasped by the International Space Station robotic arm, to reach a rip in the outpost's Port 6 solar array. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 2, 2007, 08:31 PM
Risky spacewalk will test astronaut's skill (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/11/02/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071102-sts120-strap-loc-02.jpg)

A view of damage to the International Space Station's 4B solar array wing, which occurred on Oct. 30, 2007. White lines placed on the image show where spacewalker Scott Parazynski will thread in "cuff links" to button up stress to the damage site. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071102-sts120-array-fix-02.jpg)

Computer-generated views show how Scott Parazynski will approach the damage site on the 4B solar array wing. He will carry an insulated "hockey stick" like device to defend himself from any unexpected solar array movements. Credit: NASA TV

50 Years Ago: The First Dog in Orbit  (http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5itsQUTN3PNaBTb8Bu7vPIb__xFhAD8SLP5TO0)

(http://ap.google.com/media/ALeqM5hGocggBqOxkF_cR0PAWE9Zvb7nVw?size=m)

(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/rip.gif)  Laika.  :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 3, 2007, 06:00 PM
Space crew fixes solar wing (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/11/03/spacewalk.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/194029main_complete-1.jpg)

Astronaut Scott Parazynski, riding on the end of the Orbiter Boom Sensor System, assesses his repair work as the solar array is fully deployed. Image credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on November 4, 2007, 10:18 AM
Another wow. It's awesome we can do stuff like this.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 5, 2007, 12:15 AM
The STS-120 crew bid farewell to the Expedition 16 crew before the hatches closed at 3:03 p.m. EST Sunday between Discovery and the station. Attention now turns to Discovery’s undocking from the station a little after 5:30 a.m. Monday.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/194029main_4-2007-11-04_133614.jpg)

The STS-120 and Expedition 16 crew members bid farewell to each other. Image credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 5, 2007, 07:32 PM
Discovery undocks for ride home (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/11/05/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071105-sts120-undockB-02.jpg)

A camera mounted to the exterior of the International Space Station caught this view of the shuttle Discovery after its Nov. 5, 2007 undocking and the departure of its STS-120 crew. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071105-sts120-undock-02.jpg)

This view, taken by a camera aboard the shuttle Discovery, shows the new look of the International Space Station (ISS) after the STS-120 crew moved a solar array and installed a new module. Discovery undocked on Nov. 5, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.

Shuttle and Space Station Create Backyard Sky Show

With the Space Shuttle Discovery having successfully undocked from the International Space Station (ISS) early Monday morning, skywatchers across much of the United States and southern Canada are now in for a real treat on Tuesday and Wednesday mornings.

Weather permitting, there will be opportunities to see both the Discovery orbiter and the ISS independently flying across the sky from many locations.The sight should easily be visible to anyone, even from brightly lit cities.

The shuttle-ISS tandem will be visible across southern Canada and most of the 48 contiguous United States. Unfortunately, neither Hawaii nor Alaska will have favorable viewing passes during this week. 

Viewing times and locations are available at these three sites:

NASA's SkyWatch  (http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/realdata/sightings/)

Science@NASA's J-Pass  (http://science.nasa.gov/Realtime/JPass/)

Chris Peat's Heavens Above  (http://www.heavens-above.com/)



(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070613_iss_flare_02.jpg)

Another ISS flare photographed as the space station passed over the town of Nydek in the Czech Republic in June, 2007. Credit: Martin Popek.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070613_iss_flare2_02.jpg)

An ISS flare caused by sunlight reflecting off the solar panels of the space station was captured by amateur astronomer Mike Tyrell as it passed over England in June, 2007. Credit: Mike Tyrrell.

Comet surprise makes it visible to naked eye (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/11/05/brighter.comet.ap/index.html)

(http://i.l.cnn.net/cnn/2007/TECH/space/11/05/brighter.comet.ap/art.comet.ap.jpg)

Comet 17P/Holmes is seen among the stars of the constellation Perseus in the North-Eastern sky.

China satellite orbits Earth's moon (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/11/05/china.orbit.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 9, 2007, 09:51 PM
Discovery lands after challenging mission (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/11/07/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071106-sts120-iss-fly-02.jpg)

A view from the space shuttle Discovery shortly after it departed the International Space Station on Nov. 5, 2007. On its STS-120 mission, Discovery left behind a bus-sized room for the orbital laboratory and a replacement for one of the Expedition 16 crew. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071107-sts120-landingC-02.jpg)

The wheels on Space shuttle Discovery kick up dust on Runway 33 as they touch down at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, concluding the 15-day mission STS-120 to the International Space Station on Nov. 7, 2007. Credit: NASA/George Shelton.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071109-exp16-eva1-node2-02.jpg)

Expedition 16 spacewalkers Peggy Whitson (bottom right) and Yuri Malenchenko are shown at the end of the Harmony module preparing to remove a cover from the Common Berthing Mechanism during a Nov. 9, 2007 EVA outside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071109-exp16-eva1-02.jpg)

Expedition 16 spacewalkers Yuri Malenchenko (left) and Peggy Whitson prepare the International Space Station for the relocation of its PMA-2 shuttle docking port to the end of the Harmony node on Nov. 9, 2007. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on November 12, 2007, 07:57 PM
I'm out at Vandenberg AFB right now where the US launches all spacecraft that will be put into a polar or retrograde orbit.  I've seen a couple of launches out here in the past, including one of the last Titan II rockets to ever be launched.  Hoefully, I'll be able to see a few more while I'm out here.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 13, 2007, 07:14 PM
That would have been neat to see.  8)

This is really ******* out of this world.  8)

Wow! Moon Probe Captures 'Earth-rise' in High Definition  (http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2007/11/20071113_kaguya_e.html)

Click on the pics below for the HD version.  8)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071113-earth-setting-02.jpg) (http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2007/11/img/20071113_kaguya_03l.jpg) 

Earth-set sequence: The images shot by the HDTV onboard Kaguya show the Earth setting to the horizon near the Moon's south pole. It took about 70 seconds from the left image to the right image (complete setting). Credit: JAXA/NHK.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071113-earth-spole-02.jpg) (http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2007/11/img/20071113_kaguya_02l.jpg)

Earth-set: This still image was taken from a moving image shot by the HDTV onboard Kaguya and sent to the JAXA Usuda Deep Space Center. The Moon's surface is a region near its south pole. On Earth, you can Australia (center left) and Asia (lower right). The upper side of the Earth is the Southern Hemisphere, thus the Australian Continent looks upside-down. Credit: JAXA/NHK.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071113-earth-rise-02.jpg) (http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071113-earth-rise-00.jpg)

Earth-rise: In the image, made from a moving image taken onboard the Kaguya spacecraft, a region of the moon's surface near its north pole is shown. The Arabian Peninsula and Indian Ocean can be observed on the Earth. Credit: JAXA/NHK

This Moving image of the Moon shot by the HDTV camera (http://www.jaxa.jp/press/2007/11/20071107_kaguya_movie_e.html) is just spectacular.

Gotta give those Japanese credit for those pics.  :o  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 17, 2007, 04:23 AM
The space station's European lab set for a December launch on 6th.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071116-columbus-lab-02.jpg)

In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, the Columbus Laboratory module is moved to a payload canister in preparation for its journey to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/George Shelton.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071116-atlantis-pad-02.jpg)

Platforms are extended toward Space Shuttle Atlantis from the fixed service structure, as processing begins for Atlantis' launch to the International Space Station on mission STS-122, targeted for Dec. 6. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.

Also the Leonid Meteor Shower peaks this weekend (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,312014,00.html).  Enjoy.  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 6, 2007, 09:47 PM
Atlantis launch off at least until Saturday (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/12/06/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071206-sts122-pad39a-02.jpg)

Following rollback of the rotating service structure, or RSS, on Launch Pad 39A, Space Shuttle Atlantis stands bathed in lights atop a mobile launch platform on Dec. 5, 2007. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/h_eco_sensors_02.jpg)

A diagram of the engine cutoff (ECO) sensors inside the external tanks used by NASA's space shuttle. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 8, 2007, 12:10 AM
Space shuttle launch delayed until Sunday (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/12/07/shuttle.launch/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 9, 2007, 02:47 PM
No launch till January.

On-the-fritz sensor grounds Atlantis until next year (http://www.cnn.com/2007/TECH/space/12/09/space.shuttle/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071204-columbus-02.jpg)

An artist's impression of Columbus, a cutaway view, the European laboratory module of the International Space Station. Credits: ESA - D.Ducros.
Title: Man-like object found on mars!!!
Post by: Straxus on January 25, 2008, 12:38 AM
http://www.yahoo.com/s/791306 (http://www.yahoo.com/s/791306)

Its probably just a natural rock formation, though one can be hopeful that it is not!
Martian lawn gnome?
It looks kinda like that old Patterson Bigfoot video! So thats why no one has found bigfoot, they come from mars! hehe.
Title: Re: Man-like object found on mars!!!
Post by: Mikey D on January 25, 2008, 07:47 AM
I, for one, welcome our new rocky Martian overlords.
Title: Re: Man-like object found on mars!!!
Post by: JangoTat on January 25, 2008, 08:54 AM
looks fake....and if it was real....they wouldnt have shown it to the public  ;)
Title: Re: Man-like object found on mars!!!
Post by: stormie on January 25, 2008, 10:07 AM
Looks like a Tusken. I wonder if they have pics of the Banthas?
Title: Re: Man-like object found on mars!!!
Post by: Force Guy on January 25, 2008, 10:18 AM
It looks kinda like that old Patterson Bigfoot video!

Yep, it looks like Sasquatch with a limp wrist.  Uh oh...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 25, 2008, 07:17 PM
Bigfoot on Mars, what next? Some kind of eel like object  or maybe a skull?  ::)

(http://farm3.static.flickr.com/2005/1810315242_159cd1b228.jpg)

(http://i242.photobucket.com/albums/ff217/myufos/1-102-skull-context-view.jpg)

(http://www.alienvideo.net/images/articles/06-12/mars_2-102-skull-closer-views.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 25, 2008, 08:35 PM
Clicky picture for a high res image from the lander, enlarge & view the lower left corner area & you will see said bigfoot.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080124-mars-lizard-02.jpg) (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpeg/PIA10214.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on January 28, 2008, 09:13 AM
Cool pictures. Amazing the types of random shapes nature can produce that don't look random in the right light/angle.

Has anyone seen the picture of the Angel galaxies? It's three galaxies merging together, but looks like a bird or an angel.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: JangoTat on January 28, 2008, 11:45 AM
the skull photo kinda reminds me of an airborne troopers helmet..just a little though.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 7, 2008, 07:24 PM
Atlantis en route to space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/07/spaceshuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080207-sts122-launch-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla. Thursday Feb. 7, 2008. Atlantis' seven member crew is on a 11-day mission to deliver Columbus, a laboratory module built by the European Space Agency, to the international space station. Credit: AP Photo/Marta Lavandier.

Here's a really nice Hi-Res pic of the lift off.  8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/170419main_08pd0203.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 8, 2008, 07:59 PM
Astronauts to check shuttle for damage (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/08/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080207-sts122-inflight-02.jpg)

NASA's shuttle Atlantis climbs toward space during launch on Feb. 7, 2008 of the STS-122 mission carrying the Columbus lab to the ISS. A solid rocket booster can be seen falling away from the spacecraft at left. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080208-sts122-view-02.jpg)

A camera inside the payload bay of shuttle Atlantis reveals the Earth behind the orbiter's docking mechanism (right) after a Feb. 7, 2008 launch. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 9, 2008, 08:25 PM
NASA examines shuttle; illness prompts spacewalk delay (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/09/nasa.shuttle/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080209-sts122-blanket-02.jpg)

A tear in the thermal blanket of Atlantis' right Orbital Maneuvering System pod, as seen from the International Space Station prior to docking on Feb. 9, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080209-sts122-oms-pod-02.jpg)

A view of space shuttle Atlantis' Orbital Maneuvering System (OMS) pods, where NASA has found a small tear in a thermal blanket during its February 2008 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080209-sts122-atlantis-02.jpg)

A view of the Atlantis space shuttle after docking with the International Space Station on Feb. 9, 2008. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 11, 2008, 06:14 PM
Spacewalkers anchor new lab to space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/11/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080211-sts122-eva1-02.jpg)

STS-122 astronauts Rex Walheim and Stanley Love (attached to the robotic arm) install the Power Data Grapple Fixture on the Columbus laboratory during a Feb. 11, 2008 spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/071209-sts122-columbusA-02.jpg)

The Columbus laboratory (right) moves closer toward the starboard port of the Harmony connecting node at the International Space Station during a Feb. 11, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 12, 2008, 07:28 PM
Astronauts prepare to open Columbus space lab (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/12/shuttle.ap/index.html#cnnSTCText)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080212-sts122-columbus-02.jpg)

The newly installed Columbus is shown attached to the International Space Station with the shuttle Atlantis in the background after a Feb. 11, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080212-sts122-ingress-02.jpg)

European astronaut and station flight engineer Leopold Eyharts photographs the inside of the new Columbus laboratory. In the foreground is European astronaut and mission specialist Hans Schlegel. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 13, 2008, 07:57 PM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080213-sts122-eva2-tank-02.jpg)

STS-122 spacewalker Rex Walheim prepares to retrieve an empty nitrogen tank after installing a new one at the International Space Station on Feb. 13, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/211186main_eva2_rex.jpg)

Spacewalker Rex Walheim works in the payload bay of space shuttle Atlantis. Photo credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 15, 2008, 07:19 PM
Astronauts attach science experiments to new lab (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/15/shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080215-sts122-eva3-02.jpg)

The view from STS-122 spacewalker Stanley Love's spacesuit helmet camera reveals crewmate Rex Walheim (upper right) and the station's Columbus lab backlit by the blue limb of the Earth. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080215-sts122-eva3-gyro-02.jpg)

STS-122 spacewalker Stanley Love totes a massive, broken gyroscope toward the shuttle Atlantis' cargo bay on Feb. 15, 2008. The European Columbus lab is visible behind him at the upper right. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080215-sts122-eva3-solar-02.jpg)

Spacewalker Stanley Love rides the space station's robotic arm as he delivers the SOLAR experiment to the end of the Columbus lab on Feb. 15, 2008 during the STS-122 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 18, 2008, 03:55 PM
Space shuttle undocks, starts journey back to Earth (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/18/atlantis.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080218-sts122-depart-02.jpg)

An exterior camera on the International Space Station caught this view of the shuttle Atlantis backlit by the Earth during its Feb. 18, 2008 undocking for NASA's STS-122 mission. A station solar array is visible at left. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080218-sts122-iss-02.jpg)

This view of the International Space Station, taken by a camera in the shuttle Atlantis' docking port, shows the station with its new Columbus lab (bottom, pointing left), after the spacecraft undocked Feb. 18, 2008 during NASA's STS-122 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080218-sts122-undock-02.jpg)

A camera aboard the shuttle Atlantis reveals the International Space Station after the Columbus lab's delivery during a Feb. 18, 2008 undocking for NASA's STS-122 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 19, 2008, 08:03 PM
Weather Looks Good for Wednesday Shuttle Landing.

The shuttle Atlantis is scheduled to land Wednesday at 9:07 a.m. EST (1407 GMT) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center (KSC), though the space agency has also called up a backup runway at California's Edwards Air Force Base.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070219-sts122-postundock-02.jpg)

Backdropped by a blue and white Earth, the International Space Station is seen from the shuttle Atlantis as the two spacecraft begin their relative separation on Feb. 18, 2008. The European Columbus lab is visible jutting from the ISS at upper right. Credit: NASA.

Other space news:

U.S. issues notice on downing of satellite (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/18/satellite.intercept/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on February 20, 2008, 11:17 AM
I caught the news this morning and they were talking about blowing that satellite up.  Sounds kinda interesting as the satellite will be travelling 17,000mph and the missle only 5,000mph.  The satellite will actually be hitting the missle if everything works out correctly. 

What I found odd is why they're doing it on the night of an eclipse...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on February 20, 2008, 04:39 PM
That's just timing, they have a few short windows of opportunity to hit this satellite when it's actually producing a significant amount of heat.  All of this just to ensure the hydrazine tank burns up on reentry.

What time will the eclipse hit totality?  Not like it matter here since it's completely overcast.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 20, 2008, 07:12 PM
Total lunar eclipse offers treat for skywatchers (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/20/lunar.eclipse.ap/index.html)

Wednesday's total eclipse phase will last nearly an hour. It will begin around 7 p.m. on the West Coast and 10 p.m. on the East Coast. West Coast skygazers will miss the start of the eclipse because it occurs before the moon rises.

When to watch

Eclipses occur only at full moon when the sun, Earth and moon are in a perfect line. Because the moon's orbit around Earth is not perfectly aligned with the plane of Earth's orbit around the sun, eclipses do not occur at every full moon.

The moon will enter Earth's umbral shadow (the full shadow) at 8:43 p.m. ET (that's 7:43 p.m. Central, 6:43 p.m. Mountain and 5:43 p.m. Pacific) on Wednesday, Feb. 20. It will appear as though an ever-larger bite is being taken out of the moon.

Some 78 minutes later, the moon will slip into full eclipse. About 51 minutes later, a bright scallop will appear as the moon starts emerging. It will be completely out of the umbral shadow at 9:09 p.m. Pacific time, which is 12:09 a.m. ET on Thursday morning.

For Europe and Africa, the eclipse is a predawn Thursday event, with the moon starting entry to the umbral shadow at 1:43 Greenwich (or Universal) Time.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080220-eclipse-map-02.jpg)

On Wednesday evening, Feb. 20th, the full Moon over the Americas will turn a delightful shade of red and possibly turquoise, too. It's a total lunar eclipse—the last one until Dec. 2010. Credit: NASA

Navy waits for satellite kill shot (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/20/satellite.shootdown/index.html)

Spy Satellite's Destruction Might Be Visible

Debris from the Department of Defense's planned shoot-down of a spy satellite may be visible to skywatchers in the northwestern United States and Canada, according to the U.S. Naval Observatory.

Although it's hard to predict what will happen if the rocket succeeds in impacting the satellite, there is a chance that observers will see broken-off pieces of the satellite reflecting sunlight or burning up as they fall through Earth's atmosphere. The window of opportunity for the attempt is open for the next 10 days or so, though bad weather and high seas make it unlikely the exercise will occur today.

"There is a possibility that if someone were to have clear skies in the Pacific Northwest or Canada, they might see some of the debris," said Geoff Chester, public affairs officer for the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C. "We just don't know. If the debris does enter the atmosphere then it's actually quite possible to see it anywhere along the ground track of the satellite."

Because only two satellites have been shot down before, each under unique conditions, experts don't have much experience to go on in predicting what to expect.

Shuttle safely home ahead of satellite shootdown (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/02/20/atlantis.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080220-sts122-esalab-02.jpg)

The European Space Agency's Columbus lab gets its closeup as the shuttle Atlantis undocked from the International Space Station on Feb. 18, 2008. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080220-sts122-landing-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis successfully touches down at Kennedy Space Center on Feb. 7 2008 at 9:07 a.m. EST. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/213457main_image_1023_946-710.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis' drag chute slowed down the craft as it landed on Runway 15 of the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center after a nearly 5.3 million mile round trip to the International Space Station. Credit NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 20, 2008, 09:27 PM
I just stepped outside to see if I could spot the moon & the eclipse is happening. We have clear skies.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on February 20, 2008, 10:52 PM
I just stepped outside to see if I could spot the moon & the eclipse is happening. We have clear skies.  8)

Same here in MN.  Very cold though...It's beautiful.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Morgbug on February 21, 2008, 12:00 AM
All but done here.  Clear skies are the benefit of this hideously cold weather.  Perfect views for the lunar eclipse.  Saturn was clearly visible too.   8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on February 21, 2008, 01:23 PM
Anyone get any pictures of the eclipse?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 21, 2008, 07:28 PM
I took a few pics but with a 4.1 meg... didn't turn out to good.  :-\

The link below has some nice shots from around the globe.

Total Eclipse of the Moon: Your Photos (http://blog.wired.com/wiredscience/2008/02/pictures-of-las.html)

As for the satellite, a short video on Youtube. Before I went to work, on CNN they said it blew up like the Death Star. I had a good laugh, was that like the original or the special edition!  :D

Satellite Shot Down(Raw Video)
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvXV2QEdA34)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jayson on February 28, 2008, 05:11 PM
(http://www.foxnews.com/images/root_images/022808_r2d2.jpg)

The Real R2D2: ASTRO Takes on Space Rogues (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,333575,00.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on February 29, 2008, 03:39 PM
As for the satellite, a short video on Youtube. Before I went to work, on CNN they said it blew up like the Death Star. I had a good laugh, was that like the original or the special edition!  :D

Satellite Shot Down(Raw Video)
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lvXV2QEdA34)


How do we know that "satellite" wasn't an alien spacecraft?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 3, 2008, 10:39 PM
NASA Spacecraft Photographs Avalanches on Mars  (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/mro/newsroom/pressreleases/20080303a.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080303-mars-avalanche-02.jpg)

This image has captured at least four Martian avalanches, or debris falls, in action. It was taken on February 19, 2008, by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

Also a nice shot of home from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter.  8)

Earth and Moon as Seen from Mars (http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/catalog/PIA10244)

(http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/jpeg/PIA10244.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on March 3, 2008, 10:42 PM
Wow!  Those photos are impressive!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 3, 2008, 10:55 PM
Yeah, pretty darn cool ****.

Check out this past pic from the Mars Global Surveyor in 2003, what a difference between the pics. Clicky on pics for larger size.

First Picture of Earth From Mars (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2003/05/0522_030522_earthmars.html)

(http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2003/05/22/earth_jupiter_i1.jpg) (http://www.msss.com/mars_images/moc/2003/05/22/earth_jupiter_100.jpg)

Oh yeah, home from the surface from Mars.

(http://tbn0.google.com/images?q=tbn:MZfjEot43COE3M:http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040311a/11-ml-02-earth-A067R1.jpg) (http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/press/spirit/20040311a/11-ml-02-earth-A067R1.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 10, 2008, 07:57 PM
Here we go again with another shuttle launch set for early tomorrow morning. Guess I'll have to watch a recording of the lift off, to early for me at 2:28 a.m. EDT.   (http://www.cheesebuerger.de/images/midi/muede/d027.gif)

Endeavour crew set to lift off, assemble robot (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/10/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080310-sts123-launchpad-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour sits poised atop its Launch Pad 39A for a March 11, 2008 launch. Credit: NASA/Amanda Diller.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080310-sts123-rss-roll-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour is revealed from behind its rotating service structure on Marc 10, 2008 at Kennedy Space Center's Pad 39A in preparation for the launch of STS-123. Credit: collectSPACE.com

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080303-sts123-issmodule-02.jpg)

The International Space Station's Canadian-built Dextre robot and Japan's Kibo lab logistics module are highlighted in this image. The new robot and orbital room will be delivered during NASA's STS-123 mission to launch in March 2008. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jeff on March 10, 2008, 10:41 PM
The International Space Station's Canadian-built Dextre robot

I'm assuming that "Dextre" is some kind of space-age beer-dispenser?  Or is it a bubble hockey machine?   ???
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on March 11, 2008, 09:11 AM
Hard to believe that all the shuttles will be retired next decade and that we'll have no manned space vehicles for a time.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on March 11, 2008, 11:16 AM
When is the launch of the new space plane?

(http://www.spacetoday.org/images/SpcShtls/SpacePlane/OrbitalSpacePlaneInOrbit600x597.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 11, 2008, 07:42 PM
According to the link from where that pic is from, this year. I think that was just a proposal.

Orbital Space Plane (http://www.spacetoday.org/SpcShtls/SpacePlane.html)

Endeavour on way to international space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/11/shuttle.launch.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080311-sts123-launchB-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour lifts off from pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., Tuesday, March 11, 2008. Credit: Pete Cosgrove/AP.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080311-sts123-etsep-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour pulls away from its external tank after a successful predawn launch on March 11, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/216578main_1037_946-710.jpg)

The Space Shuttle Endeavour lights up the early morning sky at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, lifting off at 2:28 a.m. EDT on Tuesday, March 11.

Endeavour's mission, STS-123, will carry two new components to the International Space Station: the first section of the Japanese Kibo lab and Canada's two-armed robotic system, known as Dextre.

Endeavour will alsodeliver a new station crew member, Garretr Reisman, and bring back European Space Agency astronaut Leopold Eyharts, who has been on the station since Feb. 9. Photo credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann.

The International Space Station's Canadian-built Dextre robot

I'm assuming that "Dextre" is some kind of space-age beer-dispenser?  Or is it a bubble hockey machine?   ???

Yes Jeff, the Dextre is a space-age beer-dispenser that will be installed on the station. I'm sure they will know where to tap that out.  :D

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/PE%20Diecast%20Eagle/Beer-Station-8103.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 12, 2008, 07:08 PM
Shuttle crew checks for damage (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/12/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080311-robotic-arm-02.jpg)

A view inside of space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay just hours after the spacecraft launched on March 11, 2008. The shuttle's sensor-tipped extension boom can be soon on the right side of this payload bay view. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080312-sts123-fd3-02.jpg)

A look inside the payload bay of space shuttle Endeavour before its planned docking at the ISS during NASA's STS-123 mission in March 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080312-sts123-predock-02.jpg)

The International Space Station awaits the arrival of the space shuttle Endeavor's STS-123 crew on March 12, 2008. Credit: NASA.

Cassini testing for water on one of Saturn's moons (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/12/saturn.moon.ap/index.html)

(http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/moons/images/PIA09770-br500.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 13, 2008, 07:11 PM
Shuttle Endeavour docks with space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/13/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080312-sts123-iss-02.jpg)

A view of the International Space Station as space shuttle Endeavour closed in on it for docking on March 12, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/*******-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour arrives at the International Space Station on March 12, 2008 during NASA's STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080313-sts123-pre-eva1-02.jpg)

Space Shuttle Endeavour is docked at the International Space Station during the STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080313-sts123-eva1-prep-02.jpg)

Astronauts prepare for the first of five spacewalks during the STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

Meteor Videotaped Plunging to Earth (http://www.space.com/php/video/player.php?video_id=080311-meteor2)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080313-meteor-img-02.jpg)

Still frame of the meteor plummeting toward the ground. Credit: The University of Western Ontario.


NASA: Data from Saturn moon 'looks great' (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/13/saturn.moon.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on March 14, 2008, 09:18 AM
When is the launch of the new space plane?


As Dale mentioned, I think it's just a proposal as well. The next US manned vehicle is going back to the Apollo type rockets from what I understand.

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on March 14, 2008, 03:39 PM
That's too bad. It seems like a step back.  :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 14, 2008, 08:51 PM
Space station's new robot on blink (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/14/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080314-sts123-slp-dextre-02.jpg)

Lead spacewalker Rick Linnehan works to install one of the "hands" of the Canadian-built Dextre robot on March 14, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080314-sts123-jlp-module-02.jpg)

Grappled by space shuttle Endeavour's robotic arm, the Japanese Logistics Pressurized module is maneuvered to a temporary berthing point on top of the U.S. Harmony node during spacewalking operations on March 14, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

As for the moon mission, this is what NASA is settling on:

How We'll Get Back to the Moon (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/exploration/spacecraft/cev.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/123126main_rockets_full.jpg)

So yeah, a step back almost to the stoneage but the Apollo type craft has done well, may not be a Saturn V type but as long as it works.  ;)  Werner Von Braun's vision, reality!  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 15, 2008, 07:08 PM
Space robot powers up (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/15/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080314-sts123-eva1-self-02.jpg)

Astronaut Garrett Reisman, Expedition 16 flight engineer, uses a digital camera to expose a photo of his helmet visor during the STS-123 mission's first spacewalk Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080314-sts123-eva1-arm-02.jpg)

Astronaut Rick Linnehan, STS-123 mission specialist, stands on the end of the Canadarm2 during a seven-hour spacewalk on March 14, 2008. Linnehan worked to help install the "hands" of the Canadian-built Dextre robot. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080314-sts123-dextre-arm-02.jpg)

The space station's robotic arm (left) attaches to a power data grapple fixture of the the Dextre robot (right), which is secured in a high-tech shipping pallet. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 16, 2008, 04:25 PM
Spacewalkers resort to banging, pry bar  (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/16/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080316-sts123-eva2-dext1-02.jpg)

Astronaut Rick Linnehan finishes work on the two-armed Dextre robot on March 16, 2008. Linnehan worked with fellow spacewalker Mike Foreman to attach Dextre's two giant, seven-jointed arms. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080316-sts123-eva2-linnehan-02.jpg)

Spacewalker Rick Linnehan dangles from the end of the space station's Canadarm2 on March 16, 2008. The STS-123 mission specialist helped attach the Dextre robot's twin arms during a spacewalk that lasted more than 7 hours. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080316-sts123-fd7-dextre-02.jpg)

Endeavour mission specialists Rick Linnehan and Mike Foreman work with the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator during the second spacewalk of the STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 17, 2008, 08:00 PM
Astronauts flex robot's arms, prepare for walk (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/17/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080316-sts123-dextre-test-02.jpg)

A camera on the exterior of the International Space Station observes Canada's two-armed Dextre maintenance robot. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/217759main_image_1041_946-710.jpg)

Expedition 16 flight engineer Garrett Reisman participated in the STS-123 mission's first scheduled spacewalk as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the seven-hour spacewalk, Reisman and fellow astronaut Rick Linnehan prepared the Japanese logistics module-pressurized section for removal from Endeavour's payload bay; opened the Centerline Berthing Camera System on top of the Harmony module; removed the Passive Common Berthing Mechanism and installed both the Orbital Replacement Unit tool change out mechanisms on the Canadian-built Dextre robotic system, the final element of the station's Mobile Servicing System.Image Credit: NASA.

A space walk is happining right now & you can see it live on NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html). Cool beans man.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 18, 2008, 07:22 PM
Robot will be attached, begin duties today (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/18/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080317-sts123-eva3-dex-02.jpg)

STS-123 spacewalkers Robert Behnken (bottom) and Rick Linnehan add a toolkit and camera eyes to the Dextre maintenance robot during a March 17, 2008 spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080317-sts123-eva3-dexB-02.jpg)

Endeavour astronaut Robert Behnken works on the maintenance robot Dextre at the ISS during a March 17, 2008 spacewalk high above Earth, the third of NASA's STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 19, 2008, 07:49 PM
Astronauts attach robot to space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/18/space.shuttle.ap/index.html#cnnSTCText)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080318-sts123-dextre-des-02.jpg)

The International Space Station's Dextre robot is shown attached to the U.S. Destiny lab via a camera on the orbiting lab's exterior. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080319-sts123-eva3-02.jpg)

Astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-123 mission specialist, participates in the mission's third spacewalk to complete construction of the Canadian Dextre robot on March 17/18, 2008. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 20, 2008, 07:01 PM
Astronauts testing emergency repairs (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/20/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080317-sts123-eva3-dexB-02.jpg)

Endeavour astronaut Robert Behnken works on the maintenance robot Dextre at the ISS during a March 17, 2008 spacewalk high above Earth, the third of NASA's STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080318-slp-02.jpg)

The Spacelab Logistics Pallet (SLP) that brought the Dextre robot to the space station has a 28 year history that includes three earlier flights. From top left to bottom right: STS-51F, STS-45, STS-100 and STS-123. CREDIT: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080318-sts123-dextre-day-02.jpg)

The Canadian Space Agency's Dextre maintenance robot is pried free from a cargo pallet outside the International Space Station on March 18, 2008 during NASA's STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/218709main_image_1044_800-600.jpg)

Visible through a window on Endeavour's aft flight deck, astronaut Rick Linnehan participates in the mission's third scheduled spacewalk. During the 6-hour, 53-minute spacewalk, Linnehan and astronaut Robert L. Behnken installed a spare-parts platform and tool-handling assembly for Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator. Among other tasks, they also checked out and calibrated Dextre's end effector and attached critical spare parts to an external stowage platform. The new robotic system is scheduled to be activated on a power and data grapple fixture located on the Destiny laboratory on flight day nine. Image Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 21, 2008, 10:34 PM
Crew uses boom to check shuttle's skin (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/21/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080321-sts123-nose-02.jpg)

A low angle view of the nose and underside of the space shuttle Endeavour's crew cabin was provided by Expedition 16 crewmembers on the International Space Station (ISS) before docking on March 12, 2008. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080321-sts123-fd12-02.jpg)

This view shows the shuttle Endeavour docked at the International Space Station early on March 21, 2008. The shuttle's robotic arm can be seen outstretched at right. Credit: NASA TV.

Star explodes halfway across universe (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/21/exploding.star.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080321-grb-optical-02.jpg)

GRB 080319B's optical afterglow appears in the center of this image from Pi of the Sky, a Polish group that monitors the sky for afterglows and other short-lived sources. Credit: Pi of the Sky.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080321-grb-afterglow-02.jpg)

The extremely luminous afterglow of GRB 080319B was imaged by Swift's X-ray Telescope (left) and Optical/Ultraviolet Telescope (right). This was by far the brightest gamma-ray burst afterglow ever seen. Credit: NASA/Swift/Stefan Immler, et al.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 22, 2008, 08:52 PM
Astronauts check off to-do list on spacewalk (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/22/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080322-sts123-eva5boom-02.jpg)

This view of the shuttle Endeavour, taken by an ISS exterior camera, shows the orbiter's inspection boom outstretched on the right at the tip of its robotic arm. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080322-sts123-eva5prep-02.jpg)

Endeavour shuttle astronaut Robert Behnken participates in the third of five spacewalks of NASA's STS-123 mission to the ISS on MArch 17, 2008. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/216771main_sts123_eva5_start.jpg)

An astronaut exits the U.S. Quest airlock beginning the fifth spacewalk of the STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 24, 2008, 02:09 AM
Shuttle crew packs up for trip home
 (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/23770811/)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080322-sts123-foremaneva5-02.jpg)

STS-123 astronaut Mike Foreman examines a damaged Solar Alpha Rotary Joint outside the ISS during a March 22, 2008 spacewalk, the fifth for the Endeavour shuttle crew. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080322-sts123-eva5-view-02.jpg)

The shuttle Endeavour is backdropped by a blue Earth in this view from the spacesuit helmet camera of STS-123 astronaut Mike Foreman during a March 22, 2008 spacewalk. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080322-sts123-eva5-obss-02.jpg)

STS-123 astronauts on the flight deck of the shuttle Endeavour recorded this view as the orbiter's inspection boom was attached to the ISS exterior in a March 22, 2008 spacewalk. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 24, 2008, 10:59 PM
Endeavour heads home after fond farewells (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/03/24/space.shuttle.upd.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080324-sts123-shadow-02.jpg)

The shadow of NASA's space shuttle Endeavour is projected on solar arrays outside the International Space Station on March 23, 2008 during the STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080324-sts123-undock-02.jpg)

A camera aboard NASA's shuttle Endeavour captured this view of the International Space Station after a March 24, 2008 undocking over the west coast of Australia. Japan's new Kibo storage module appears as the small cylinder jutting upwards at the center. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 25, 2008, 12:46 AM
Mixed signals from NASA about fate of Mars rover (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/24/nasa.mars.rover/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070521_rover_wetterpast_02.jpg)

NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit finds a patch of bright-toned soil so rich in silica that scientists propose water must have been involved in concentrating it. Credit: NASA/JPL/Cornell.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 25, 2008, 03:53 PM
Shuttle crew prepares for landing (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/25/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080325-sts123-fd16-02.jpg)

NASA's shuttle Endeavour backs away from the International Space Station after undocking on March 24, 2008 during the STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

NASA reverses budget cuts that threatened Mars rovers (http://space.newscientist.com/article/dn13527-nasa-reverses-budget-cuts-that-threatened-mars-rovers.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: jedipurge on March 26, 2008, 04:51 PM
All that money pours into the Space program, and NASA can't get a camera that consistantly takes pics in focus  :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 26, 2008, 05:09 PM
That is because some of the pics were taken from the live NASA TV feed hence the NASA logo on the pics.    ;)

Shuttle ready to land after 'two-week adventure' (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/26/endeavour.landing.ap/index.html)

Astronauts Begin Fluid Loading for Landing
26 March 2008 4:53 p.m. EDT

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. – Mission Control has given the crew of the shuttle Endeavour the go ahead to begin consuming massive amounts of liquid to better prepare their bodies for the return to Earth’s gravity.

Known as fluid loading, the activity is a promising sign that entry flight director Richard Jones intends to attempt the first of two landing opportunities today.

Mission Control is watching a broken deck of clouds southeast of Endeavour’s runway here at the Kennedy Space Center to decide whether they pose a threat to today’s planned landing today at 7:05 p.m. EDT (2305 GMT).

NASA astronaut Brent Jett, chief of flight operations, is flying a shuttle training aircraft to recon the clouds. Flight controllers want to know how thick they are and whether they hold any moisture. NASA shuttle cannot fly through rain or storm cloud remnants since they can damage an orbiter’s tile-covered belly or trigger lightning.

You can watch the landing of the Endeavour live on the NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html) channel.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/219421main_image_1048_800-600.jpg)

Astronaut Robert L. Behnken used a digital camera to take this self-protrait during a spacewalk. Also visible in the visor's reflections are components of the station, the docked space shuttle Endeavour and a blue and white portion of Earth.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080326-poststs123-iss-02.jpg)

Backdropped by Earth's horizon and the blackness of space, the International Space Station is seen from space shuttle Endeavour as the two spacecraft begin their relative separation on March 24, 2008 during NASA's STS-123 mission. Japan's new Kibo storage module appears as the squat cylinder atop the central module in this view. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080326-sts123-preland-02.jpg)

NASA's shuttle Endeavour is photographed by ISS astronauts during the STS-123 mission in March 2008. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080325-iod-dextre-04.jpg)

Dextre, also known as the Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator (SPDM), is seen in the grasp of the International Space Station's robotic arm while Space Shuttle Endeavour is docked with the station. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 26, 2008, 08:54 PM
The shuttle Endeavour is back home.  8)

Shuttle makes night landing after 'two-week adventure' (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/03/26/endeavour.landing.ap/index.html)

Some screen grabs I took off the NASA live feed.

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Random/SE1.jpg)  (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Random/SE2.jpg) 

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Random/SE3.jpg)  (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Random/SE4.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Random/SE5.jpg)  (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Random/SE6.jpg)

This one is from the NASA site.  :P

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/216771main_4-2008-03-26_193921.jpg)

A view of space shuttle Endeavour landing at Kennedy Space Center, Florida. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 27, 2008, 03:05 AM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080326-sts123-landing-02.jpg)

Shuttle Endeavour eased onto the runway at Kennedy Space Center March 26 at about 8:39 p.m. EDT (0039 March 27 GMT). Credit AP Images/Paul Kizzle.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/216771main_landing1.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour lands at Kennedy Space Center, Florida, capping the STS-123 mission. Credit: NASA/Tom Joseph.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/219691main_image_1049_800-600.jpg)

In the 16th night landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, space shuttle Endeavour touches down on Runway 15 to end the STS-123 mission's nearly 16-day flight to the International Space Station.

Pliers From Apollo Mission Fetch $30,000 (http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5hOZ-M4ugQtRHvXBtMXqw2FqSH5qAD8VKSEMG0)

Cyberspace bid for astronaut checklist is out of this world (http://www.star-telegram.com/dallas_news/story/547253.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on March 27, 2008, 05:28 PM
Paper Airplanes From Space? (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,342094,00.html)

An interesting idea from Japan with a lot of merit...too bad there isn't a good way to track them because I think most will land in an Ocean.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on March 27, 2008, 05:49 PM
Wow! Some of those pictures are absolutely beautiful. They would make great desktop wallpaper. Thanks for them.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on April 1, 2008, 09:54 AM
After the Shuttle retires, the next series of ships is called the Orion, similar to the Apollo.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 1, 2008, 07:43 PM
Yup & looking mighty darn good too.

Orion Crew Vehicle (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/constellation/orion/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070828_ares1_art_02.jpg)

An artist's rendition of Ares I being stacked in the vehicle assembly building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Houston-based Boeing won NASA's contract to built the rocket's upper stage, which appears in orange below the conical Orion crew capsule. Credit: NASA.

Orion Simulator Heads West  (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/constellation/main/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/219906main_orion-c17-1050x700.jpg)

Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/constellation/multimedia/orion_contract_images.html)

Orion Spacecraft (http://www.daviddarling.info/encyclopedia/O/Orion_spacecraft.html)

(http://mek.kosmo.cz/pil_lety/usa/orion/img/ori_cm.jpg)

(http://static.howstuffworks.com/gif/cev-size-comparison.gif)

A Visual History of NASA's Project Constellation (http://www.tallgeorge.com/projectconstellation.php)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: hansolo_506 on April 3, 2008, 12:25 PM
More INTERNATIONAL cooperation at the ISS Thursday morning!!!



http://www.spaceflightnow.com/ariane/v181/080403docking.html
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 7, 2008, 11:45 PM
I'm going, are you!

Send Your Name to the Moon Aboard LRO! (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/main/index.html)

NASA invites people of all ages to join the lunar exploration journey with an opportunity to send their names to the moon aboard the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter, or LRO, spacecraft.

The Send Your Name to the Moon Web site enables everyone to participate in the lunar adventure and place their names in orbit around the moon for years to come. Participants can submit their information at http://lro.jhuapl.edu/NameToMoon/, print a certificate and have their name entered into a database. The database will be placed on a microchip that will be integrated onto the spacecraft. The deadline for submitting names is June 27, 2008.

"Everyone who sends their name to the moon, like I'm doing, becomes part of the next wave of lunar explorers," said Cathy Peddie, deputy project manager for LRO at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center in Greenbelt, Md. "The LRO mission is the first step in NASA's plans to return humans to the moon by 2020, and your name can reach there first. How cool is that?"

The orbiter, comprised of six instruments and one technology demonstration, will provide the most comprehensive data set ever returned from the moon. The mission will focus on the selection of safe landing sites and identification of lunar resources. It also will study how the lunar radiation environment could affect humans.

LRO will also create a comprehensive atlas of the moon's features and resources that will be needed as NASA designs and builds a planned lunar outpost. The mission will support future human exploration while providing a foundation for upcoming science missions. LRO is scheduled for launch in late 2008.

The Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is being built at Goddard. The mission also will be managed at the center for NASA's Explorations Systems Mission Directorate in Washington.

Send Your Name to the Moon is a collaborative effort among NASA, the Planetary Society in Pasadena, Calif., and the Johns Hopkins Applied Physics Laboratory in Laurel, Md.

(http://lro.gsfc.nasa.gov/images/gallery/hi-res/LRO-Print3-with-bg-sm.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on May 8, 2008, 12:29 AM
I'm going to the moon. :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on May 8, 2008, 10:50 AM
I'm going to the moon. :)

I thought you were already there. ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Smartypants1635 on May 10, 2008, 02:57 PM
3.....2.....1.... BLASTOFF!
I'm going to the moon :o How cool is that?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jayson on May 14, 2008, 12:42 PM
NASA to Announce Success of Long Galactic Hunt (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2008/may/HQ_M08089_Chandra_Advisory.html)

Quote
WASHINGTON -- NASA has scheduled a media teleconference Wednesday, May 14, at 1 p.m. EDT, to announce the discovery of an object in our Galaxy astronomers have been hunting for more than 50 years. This finding was made by combining data from NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory with ground-based observations.

What do you think it is?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on May 14, 2008, 12:46 PM
Confirmation of a supermassive black hole at the center of the galaxy. Either that or a Mass Effect drive. :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on May 14, 2008, 01:14 PM
No they figured out what was south of the Rishi Maze.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on May 14, 2008, 01:14 PM
Quote
MEDIA ADVISORY : M06-186  NASA Schedules Briefing to Announce Significant Find on Mars   WASHINGTON - NASA hosts a news briefing at 1 p.m. EST, Wednesday, Dec. 6, to present new science results from the Mars Global Surveyor. The briefing will take place in the NASA Headquarters auditorium located at 300 E Street, S.W. in Washington and carried live on NASA Television and www.nasa.gov.

The agency last week announced the spacecraft's mission may be at its end. Mars Global Surveyor has served the longest and been the most productive of any spacecraft ever sent to the red planet. Data gathered from the mission will continue to be analyzed by scientists.

Panelists include:
- Michael Meyer -- Lead Scientist, Mars Exploration Program, NASA Headquarters, Washington
- Michael Malin -- President and Chief Scientist, Malin Space Science Systems, San Diego, Calif.
- Kenneth Edgett -- Scientist, Malin Space Science Systems
- Philip Christensen -- Professor, Arizona State University, Tempe, Ariz.

Reporters at participating agency field centers will be able to ask questions. For more information about NASA TV streaming video, downlink and schedule information, visit the web at:

I'm guessing water?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jayson on May 14, 2008, 01:24 PM
They discovered the remnants of a Supernova which is only 140 yrs old.

http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/chandra/main/index.html
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on May 16, 2008, 01:49 PM
from one of my favorite webcomics...Overcompensating.

(http://www.overcompensating.com/comics/20080515.gif)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 21, 2008, 10:42 PM
Star dies an explosive death (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/05/21/star.explosion.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080521-snova-before-02.jpg)

NASA’s Swift satellite took these images of SN 2007uy in galaxy NGC 2770 before SN 2008D exploded. An X-ray image is on the left, the right is in visible light. Credit: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080521-snova-after-02.jpg)

On January 9 2008, Swift caught a bright X-ray burst from an exploding star. A few days later, SN 2008D appeared in visible light. Credit: NASA/Swift Science Team/Stefan Immler
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 24, 2008, 01:46 AM
NASA preps for '7 minutes of terror' on Mars (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/05/23/mars.lander/index.html)

Phoenix Spacecraft on Course for May 25 Mars Landing (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/phoenix/news/phoenix-20080522.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/centers/jpl/images/content/172018main_phoenix-lander-browse.jpg)

(http://pal2pal.com/BLOGEE/images/uploads/phoenix_lander_labels.jpg)

Phoenix Mars Mission - Home (http://phoenix.lpl.arizona.edu/)

Phoenix EDL Animation - This animation featuring a heads-up display shows second-by second the entry, descent and landing of the Phoenix Mars Lander on May 25, 2008.  (http://phoenix.lpl.arizona.edu/video/edl_hud_english_high.mov)

Godspeed little dude.   :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on May 24, 2008, 10:15 AM
There is this awesome new site called worldwidetelescope.org. (http://www.worldwidetelescope.org)

Too bad Mac users, they didn't write the software for us.  >:(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 25, 2008, 07:47 PM
The Mars Phoenix Lander is about to enter the atmosphere of Mars. It should hopefully land in about 7 mins.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 25, 2008, 07:54 PM
Touchdown! Nasa has data, hopefully the litte dude survived the landing.  :)

All looks good!  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 25, 2008, 10:28 PM
Images are now showing up from the Phoenix Lander.

Phoenix Raw Images (http://phoenix.lpl.arizona.edu/images.php?gID=0&cID=7)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/229891main_phx(new)-landscape.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/229961main_combo-1-427.jpg)

These are raw, or unprocessed, images taken by the Phoenix lander on Mars, May 25, 2008. This is a screen grab taken from NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on May 26, 2008, 09:05 AM
Nice to see photos so soon. I know they like to hold onto them a study them for a month or so before release.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 26, 2008, 05:12 PM
Yeah, I'm very surprised too. Guess they were all excited that everything went well & it survived the re-entry & landing.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080626-phoenix-cracks-02.jpg)

This image shows a polygonal pattern in the ground near NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, similar in appearance to icy ground in the arctic regions of Earth. This is an approximate-color image taken shortly after landing on May 25, 2008. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080626-phoenix-distance-02.jpg)

This image, one of the first captured by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, shows the vast plains of the northern polar region of Mars just after landing on May 25, 2008. The flat landscape is strewn with tiny pebbles and shows polygonal cracking, a pattern seen widely in Martian high latitudes and also observed in permafrost terrains on Earth. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080526-mro-phoenix-02.jpg)

NASA's Mars Phoenix Lander can be seen parachuting down to Mars, in this image captured by the High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera on NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on May 25, 2008. This is the first time that a spacecraft has imaged the final descent of another spacecraft onto a planetary body. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/230153main_image_feature_1091_946-710.jpg)

Success!
NASA's Phoenix spacecraft landed in the northern polar region of Mars Sunday, May 25, 2008, to begin three months of examining a site chosen for its likelihood of having frozen water within reach of the lander's robotic arm. This black-and-white self-portrait shows Phoenix's leg nestled in the Martian soil.

Radio signals received at 7:53 p.m. EDT confirmed the Phoenix Mars Lander had survived its difficult final descent and touchdown 15 minutes earlier. The signals took that long to travel from Mars to Earth at the speed of light. Image Credit: NASA, JPL-Caltech, University of Arizona.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on May 26, 2008, 07:19 PM
Those images are great, but I think my favorite one so far is the one of the lander parachuting in taken from the MRO.  Not that it's anything spectacular, just the feat of actually getting the shot!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 26, 2008, 10:50 PM
Here's another pic of the lander coming down.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/230206main_9227-PHX_Lander.jpg)

This image has been brightened to show the patterned surface of Mars in the background. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 27, 2008, 10:35 PM
Holy ******* wow!  8)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080527-phoenix-top-02B.jpg)

The butterfly-like object in this picture is NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, as seen from above by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080527-phoenix-overview-02.jpg)

This image shows where the spacecraft parachute and heat shield fell. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080527-phoenix-crater-02.jpg)

Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter's High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera acquired this image of Phoenix hanging from its parachute as it descended to the Martian surface. Although it appears that Phoenix is descending into the crater, it is actually about 20 kilometers (about 12 miles) in front of the crater. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

Clicky links below for higher res pics of the last 2 photo's.

High Res Phoenix/Parachute/Heat Shield/Backshel  (http://hirise.lpl.arizona.edu/images/2008/details/cut/PSP_008591_2485_cut_a.jpg)

High Res Phoenix/Crater (http://spaceflightnow.com/mars/phoenix/images/080527crater.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 31, 2008, 04:19 AM
NASA's Phoenix Lander Robotic Arm Camera Sees Possible Ice (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/phoenix/news/phoenix-20080530.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/233688main_RS004EFF896573683_10F86MDM1-str.jpg)

This contrast-enhanced image was acquired at the Phoenix landing site on Sol 4 by Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera (RAC). As seen in the top center, the exhaust from the descent engine has blown soil off to reveal either rock or ice, which has not yet been determined. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University Arizona.

Phoenix Mars Lander has short-circuit problem (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080531/ap_on_sc/phoenix_mars)

Shuttle Discovery ready to carry Japanese lab into space (http://uk.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/idUKN3042572620080531)

(http://d.yimg.com/us.yimg.com/p/nm/20080531/2008_05_31t011743_450x284_us_space_shuttle.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery sits on launch pad 39A as workers prepare for launch at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida May 30, 2008. Discovery is scheduled for launch on May 31 with a crew of seven astronauts on a mission to the International Space Station. The orbiter is covered by the protective Rotating Service Structure.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 31, 2008, 06:29 PM
Discovery blasts off for space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/05/31/space.fuel.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/213835main_124_launch_HD.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery thunders off the launch pad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on May 31, 2008 to begine the STS-124 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080501-sts124-kibo-02.jpg)

In the Space Station Processing Facility at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center, an overhead crane moves the Kibo Japanese Experiment Module - Pressurized Module toward the payload canister (lower right). Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/232554main_BuzzatVAB226X170.jpg)

Fictional spaceman Buzz Lightyear will make a real-life trip into space aboard space shuttle Discovery during STS-124. The toy astronaut will mark an educational partnership between NASA and Disney. Credit: NASA/Steven Siceloff.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 31, 2008, 08:18 PM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/234233main_image_1096_946-710.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery leaps from the billows of smoke below into a clear blue sky on its STS-124 mission to the International Space Station. Launch was on time at 5:02 p.m. EDT. Discovery is making its 35th flight.

The STS-124 mission is the 26th in the assembly of the space station. It is the second of three flights launching components to complete the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory. The shuttle crew will install Kibo's large Japanese Pressurized Module and its remote manipulator system, or RMS. The 14-day flight includes three spacewalks. Image Credit: NASA/Fletch Hildreth.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080531-phoenix-ice-02.jpg)

This image, released on May 31, 2008, shows the ground underneath NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander, adding to evidence that descent thrusters dispersed overlying soil and exposed a harder substrate that may be ice. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080529-phoenix-panorama-02.jpg)

This panoramic view taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the sweeping plains of the Martian polar north. Phoenix's robotic arm scoop is visible. It was released May 29, 2008. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 1, 2008, 03:41 PM
Discovery crew checks shuttle wings for damage (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/01/shuttle.discovery.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080601-sts124-kibo-02.jpg)

A camera inside the payload bay of the shuttle Discovery caught this view of Japan's Kibo laboratory with its folded robotic arm after their May 31, 2008 launch on the STS-124 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/234817main_phx20080601b-516.jpg)

This image captured by the Robotic Arm Camera aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on Sol 6, the sixth Martian day of the mission, (May 31, 2008) shows a close-up of the "Snow Queen" feature under the lander.

Swept clear of surface dust by the thruster rockets as Phoenix landed, the area has a smooth surface with layers visible and several smooth, rounded cavities.

The Phoenix Mission is led by the University of Arizona, Tucson, on behalf of NASA. Project management of the mission is by NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif. Spacecraft development is by Lockheed Martin Space Systems, Denver. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 1, 2008, 11:28 PM
Mars lander's robotic arm touches soil (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/01/phoenix.mars.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/234813main_phx20080601a-br.jpg)

This view from the Surface Stereo Imager on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows the first impression –- dubbed Yeti and shaped like a wide footprint -- made on the Martian soil by the robotic arm scoop on Sol 6, the sixth Martian day of the mission, (May 31, 2008). Touching the ground is the first step toward scooping up soil and ice and delivering the samples to the lander's onboard experiments. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 2, 2008, 12:24 AM
Great...a little Martian inappropriate touching!   :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on June 2, 2008, 09:15 AM
I wonder why a scoop in stead of a drill? You'd think a drill could be made to penetrate deeper.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 2, 2008, 07:19 PM
Mechanically, I think too much could go wrong with a drill + collection equipment as opposed to just a scoop.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 2, 2008, 07:23 PM
Shuttle brings new resident, toilet fix to space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/02/shuttle.discovery.ap/index.html)

They have a crew on the ISP that has to go poo really bad!  :D

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080602-sts124-shuttle-02.jpg)

A camera outside the International Space Station caught this view of the shuttle Discovery backdropped by Earth during docking on June 2, 2008. Japan's massive Kibo laboratory module is visible in the payload bay. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/*******-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery is shown docked at the International Space Station on June 2, 2008 during NASA's STS-124 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

I wonder why a scoop in stead of a drill? You'd think a drill could be made to penetrate deeper.

They are taking baby steps, testing out the equipment to make sure things are working properly. Also using the scoop loosens & scraps away anything soft to get to the meat of it. Drilling will come in time.  ;)

Quote
First the nearly eight-foot (2.3 meters) robotic arm uses a backhoe motion to clear away loose regolith and expose the icy layer. A blade on the front of the scoop can try a bit of scraping, but the real digging for ice samples requires a small drill in the back of the scoop.

The spring-loaded drill is sprung against the ground and turned on, rotating and grinding against the icy soil using the spring's pressure. Wrist movements push the loosened ice samples into a chamber for further testing.

"Within about a minute or so, it kicks a fair amount of material into the scoop or chamber," said Peter Smith, Phoenix principal investigator at the University of Arizona, Tucson. Smith added that the drill would do its excavation two or three times.

The robotic arm also has scraper blades on the bottom that can clear away material and continue tearing up the icy regolith, Gross said. The arm can dig down as far as 20 inches (0.5 meters), the deepest that anyone has gone on Mars

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/235749main_rac_scoop_all_focus_color_v3.jpg)

This image from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Robotic Arm Camera (RAC) shows material from the Martian surface captured by the Robotic Arm (RA) scoop during its first test dig and dump on the seventh Martian day of the mission, or Sol 7 (June 1, 2008). The test sample shown was taken from the digging area informally known as "Knave of Hearts."

Scientists speculate that the white patches on the right side of the image could possibly be ice or salts that precipitated into the soil. Scientists also speculate that this white material is probably the same material seen in previous images from under the lander in which an upper surface of an ice table was observed. The color for this image was acquired by illuminating the RA scoop with a set of red, green, and blue light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/235737main_SS007IOF896839472_117FER1T1_full.jpg)

This color image, acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 7, the seventh day of the mission (June 1, 2008), shows the so-called "Knave of Hearts" first-dig test area to the north of the lander. The Robotic Arm's scraping blade left a small horizontal depression above where the sample was taken. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 3, 2008, 12:53 AM
Launch Pad Suffers 'Severe Damage' During Liftoff Of Shuttle Discovery (http://www.local6.com/technology/16460205/detail.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080602-sts124-padfllout-02.jpg)

This image shows launch pad debris blown into nearby waters as the shuttle Discovery lifted off from Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on May 31, 2008. Credit: Ben Cooper.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080602-sts124-padfence-02.jpg)

Debris from NASA's Pad 39A launch site lies strewn near the pad’s perimeter fence after the shuttle Discovery’s May 31, 2008 launch. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080602-sts124-pad39a-02.jpg)

This image, taken after the shuttle Discovery’s May 31, 2008 launch from Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center, shows the extend of damage and lost wall material caused during the liftoff. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 3, 2008, 07:35 PM
Shuttle astronauts venture outside (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/03/shuttle.discovery.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/237502main_JPM_move_1.jpg)

Image above: The International Space Station's robot arm moves the Japanese Pressurized Module from space shuttle Discovery's payload bay to its new home on the station. Photo credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 3, 2008, 08:03 PM
Man...they're going to have a tough time if the assembly instructions are in Japanese.  :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on June 4, 2008, 09:18 AM
Man...they're going to have a tough time if the assembly instructions are in Japanese.  :D

Hey, after that Mars mission failed a few years back because of confusion over metric vs english specifications, you never know.   ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 4, 2008, 07:28 PM
Space station toilet trouble fixed (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/04/shuttle.discovery.ap/index.html)

Well that's a relief!  :D   (http://www.cheesebuerger.de/images/midi/ekelig/c026.gif)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080603-sts123-kibo1-02.jpg)

The space station's robotic arm grabs the Japanese Kibo module to move it from the cargo bay of the space shuttle Discovery to its new spot on the Harmony node of the International Space Station (ISS). Credit NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/238445main_image_1099_946-710.jpg)

This view of space shuttle Discovery's tail section was taken on flight day 3 by the Expedition 17 crew aboard the International Space Station. The image provides partial views of the shuttle's main engines, orbital maneuvering system pods, vertical stabilizer, the payload bay door panels and the second component of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's Kibo laboratory, which was installed on flight day 4. Before docking, STS-124 commander Mark Kelly flew the shuttle through a roll pitch maneuver to allow the space station crew a good view of Discovery's heat shield. Using digital still cameras equipped with both 400 and 800 millimeter lenses, the station crew took a number of photos of the shuttle's thermal protection system and sent them to teams on the ground for analysis. A 400 millimeter lens was used for this image. Credit: NASA.

Mars lander ordered to scoop soil (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/04/phoenix.mars.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080604-phoenix-trench-02.jpg)

Two views of the trench dug by the Phoenix Robotic Arm, with the top image taken on June 1, 2008 and the bottom image taken on June 3, 2008. NASA Ames Viz software allows for interactive movement around terrain images and measurement of features. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080604-phoenix-bears-02.jpg)

Three locations to the right of the test dig area are identified for the first samples to be delivered to the Thermal and Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA), the Wet Chemistry Lab (WCL), and the Optical Microscope (OM) on the Phoenix Mars Lander. The sampling areas are informally named "Baby Bear," "Mama Bear," and "Papa Bear." Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080604-phoenix-white-02.jpg)

The second dig and dump test of Phoenix's Robotic Arm revealed whitish material at the bottom of the dig area known as the "Knave of Hearts." The Science Team is debating whether this is a salt layer or the top of an ice table. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 4, 2008, 07:33 PM
In other news, the toilet on the international space station has been repaired.  Russian ground control gave the order to try it out....did they really need to do that?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BrentS on June 4, 2008, 08:05 PM
In other news, the toilet on the international space station has been repaired. 

First order of business was a courtesy flush, followed by the uttering of "hey, can you spare a square?"
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 4, 2008, 08:07 PM
Funny stuff Brent, but it is a good illustration on how nothing is routine in orbit or beyond.  The littlest things can become major problems up there.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 5, 2008, 06:30 PM
Astronauts conduct second spacewalk (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/05/shuttle.discovery.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/234826main_sts124_eva2_fossum.jpg)

STS-124 Mission Specialist Mike Fossum exits the Quest airlock beginning the mission's second spacewalk. Photo credit: NASA TV.


(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/239400main_image_1100_946-710.jpg)

Astronaut Mike Fossum used a digital camera to create this self-portrait during the STS-124 mission's first scheduled spacewalk. During the six-hour, 48-minute spacewalk, Fossum and fellow astronaut Ron Garan prepared the Kibo Japanese Pressurized Module for its installation to the space station. Kibo was officially opened during a ceremony performed by astronaut Akihiko Hoshide and the Expedition 17 and STS-124 crew the following day, Wednesday, June 4, 2008.

During the spacewalk, Fossum and Garan also loosened restraints holding the Orbiter Boom Sensor System in its temporary stowage location on the space station's starboard truss, demonstrated cleaning techniques for the Solar Alpha Rotary Joint's (SARJ) race ring and installed a replacement SARJ Trundle Bearing Assembly. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080605-phoenix-dust-02.jpg)

This image was taken on June 3, 2008 to examine dust that had fallen onto an exposed surface. The translucent particle highlighted at bottom center is of comparable size to white particles in a Martian soil sample (upper pictures) seen two sols earlier inside the scoop of Phoenix's Robotic Arm as imaged by the lander's Robotic Arm Camera. The white particles may be examples of the abundant salts found in the Martian soil by previous missions. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080605-phoenix-particle-02.jpg)

The color image was taken on June 3, 2008. Comparison with a black-and-white image (left) acquired during Phoenix's flight from Earth to Mars, identifies new particles deposited during the landing event. The particles are presumably samples from the Martian surface, although contamination from the lander itself cannot be ruled out. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/239557main_OM2_05JUN08_mhh.jpg)

This mosaic of four side-by-side microscope images (one a color composite) was acquired by the Optical Microscope, a part of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry, and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) instrument suite on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander. Taken on the ninth Martian day of the mission, or Sol 9 (June 3, 2008), the image shows a 3 millimeter (0.12 inch) diameter silicone target after it has been exposed to dust kicked up by the landing. It is the highest resolution image of dust and sand ever acquired on Mars. The silicone substrate provides a sticky surface for holding the particles to be examined by the microscope. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 6, 2008, 02:45 PM
The Discovery Channel presents a 6 part mini series When We Left Earth (http://dsc.discovery.com/tv/nasa/nasa.html?sicontent=0&sicreative=1624150378&siclientid=2472&sitrackingid=32351064&campaign=GGL|when+we+left+earth|WWLE+-+Alone|Google+NASA+-+WWLE+-+Specific) starting this Sunday. Discovery will air 2 episode segments for 3 Sundays.

CLICK HERE to watch the cinema promotional trailer for When We Left Earth. (http://dsc.discovery.com/video/player.html?playerId=203711706&categoryId=1570000236&lineupId=1571610663&titleId=1573646994)

When We Left Earth is the story of mankind’s greatest adventure, leaving the earth and living in space. For the first time this series has digitally re-mastered the original film and audio recordings from NASA’s vault, including and all the key on-board footage filmed by the astronauts themselves. From John Glenn's Mercury mission to orbit the earth, to Neil Armstrong’s first historic steps on the moon, to the unprecedented spacewalks required to repair the Hubble telescope, these epic stories are shown in stunning clarity and told by the astronauts and engineers who were there.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 7, 2008, 12:24 AM
Astronauts take on construction job in space (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/06/shuttle.discovery.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080605-sts124-eva2-garan-02.jpg)

STS-124 mission specialist Ron Garan smiles in this camera view during a June 5, 2008 spacewalk at the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080605-sts124-eva2-kibo-02.jpg)

STS-124 spacewalkers Mike Fossum and Ron Garan outfit Japan's new Kibo laboratory outside the International Space Station during a June 5, 2008 excursion. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080605-sts124-kibo-view-02.jpg)

The Japanese Kibo pressurized laboratory extends out to the right from the Harmony node in this image taken by a camera outside the International Space Station on June 4, 2008. The Kibo lab's storage module can be seen as the squat cylinder at the bottom in this view. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080605-sts124eva1-garan-02.jpg)

Astronaut Ron Garan, STS-124 mission specialist, participates in the mission's first scheduled spacewalk to deliver the Japanese Kibo lab to the ISS on June 3, 2008. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/240306main_SS011EFF897193286_11BEEL1M1-scoop-bright-adj_516-387.jpg)

This image was taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on Sol 11 (June 5, 2008), the eleventh day after landing. It shows the Robotic Arm scoop containing a soil sample poised over the partially open door of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer's number four cell, or oven.

Light-colored clods of material visible toward the scoop's lower edge may be part of the crusted surface material seen previously near the foot of the lander. The material inside the scoop has been slightly brightened in this image. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080606-phoenix-dump-02.jpg)

NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander scooped up this Martian soil on June 5, 2008 as the first soil sample for delivery to the laboratory on the lander deck. This approximately true-color view of the contents of the scoop on the Robotic Arm comes from combining separate red, green and blue images taken by the Robotic Arm Camera. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 7, 2008, 08:53 PM
Space station's new tool works (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/07/shuttle.saturday.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080607-sts124-kibo-arm-02.jpg)

The fading blue limb of the Earth backlights the shuttle Discovery docked at the ISS. At center is the station's six-jointed Japanese robotic arm folded up at the outboard end of the new Kibo lab. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080607-sts124-kibo-test-02.jpg)

NASA astronaut Karen Nyberg (right) and Japanese astronaut Akihiko Hoshide test drive the Kibo laboratory's robotic arm on June 7, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

Mars dirt fails to reach lander's testing oven (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/07/phoenix.mars.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080607-phoenix-soilstuffed-02.jpg)

The Robotic Arm of NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander released a sample of Martian soil onto a screened opening of the lander's Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA) during the 12th Martian day, or sol, since landing (June 6, 2008). TEGA did not confirm that any of the sample had passed through the screen.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080607-phoenix-soilcol-02.jpg)

This image shows a view from NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Stereo Surface Imager's left eye after delivery of soil to the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), taken on the 12th Martian day after landing (Sol 12, June 6, 2008). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 8, 2008, 09:43 PM
Final spacewalk for Discovery astronauts (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/08/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080608-sts124-sarj-02.jpg)

STS-124 astronaut Mike Fossum inspects the port solar array joint of the ISS during a June 8, 2008 spacewalk, the third of his mission, in this view caught by a camera outside the station. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080608-sts124-eva3-02.jpg)

Spacewalkers Mike Fossum and Ron Garan work outside of the International Space Station during the third excursion of their STS-124 mission on June 8, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080608-sts124-tankmove-02.jpg)

Spacewalker Ron Garan totes a new nitrogen tank for the International Space Station to its final home while riding the station's Canadarm2 robotic arm in a June 8, 2008 spacewalk by the STS-124 shuttle crew. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080608-sts124-eva3-kibo-02.jpg)

STS-124 spacewalker Mike Fossum retrieves insulation covers and restraints from the robotic arm of Japan's Kibo lab outside the ISS on June 8, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/241325main_3402-427.jpg)

On Sunday, mechanical shakers inside the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer on Phoenix will attempt to loosen clumped soils on the device's screens to allow material to fall into the oven for analysis later in the week.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 9, 2008, 12:19 AM
I don't know if any of you are watching that new series on the Discovery Channel entitled "When We Left Earth: The NASA Missions".  It premiered tonight and it's awesome so far!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 9, 2008, 12:48 AM
I don't know if any of you are watching that new series on the Discovery Channel entitled "When We Left Earth: The NASA Missions".  It premiered tonight and it's awesome so far!

The Discovery Channel presents a 6 part mini series When We Left Earth (http://dsc.discovery.com/tv/nasa/nasa.html?sicontent=0&sicreative=1624150378&siclientid=2472&sitrackingid=32351064&campaign=GGL|when+we+left+earth|WWLE+-+Alone|Google+NASA+-+WWLE+-+Specific) starting this Sunday. Discovery will air 2 episode segments for 3 Sundays.

CLICK HERE to watch the cinema promotional trailer for When We Left Earth. (http://dsc.discovery.com/video/player.html?playerId=203711706&categoryId=1570000236&lineupId=1571610663&titleId=1573646994)

When We Left Earth is the story of mankind’s greatest adventure, leaving the earth and living in space. For the first time this series has digitally re-mastered the original film and audio recordings from NASA’s vault, including and all the key on-board footage filmed by the astronauts themselves. From John Glenn's Mercury mission to orbit the earth, to Neil Armstrong’s first historic steps on the moon, to the unprecedented spacewalks required to repair the Hubble telescope, these epic stories are shown in stunning clarity and told by the astronauts and engineers who were there.

I'll just say you guys in the US are lucky bastards, our Canadian Disovery Channel is not showing it... yet. Not sure when they will tho.  :'(

I'm hearing great reviews on the show, I may have to pick up the DVD (http://shopping.discovery.com/product-71595.html) set for $69.95.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 9, 2008, 01:05 AM
I was about to suggest picking up the DVD set Dale.  You'll love it, a great inside look at our early space program!

It's also great in HD!   :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 10, 2008, 01:02 AM
Yeah, I'm thinking of getting the DVD set for my space collection. It's too bad all my other stuff is on VHS.  :-\  Still nice to watch & see how it was all done, just like the Right Stuff.  ;)

Alan Shepard: Dear Lord, please don't let me **** up.
Gordon Cooper: I didn't quite copy that. Say again, please.
Alan Shepard: I said everything's A-OK. ;D

They should have quoted this line when the new toilet was repaired on the ISS.

Alan Shepard: Request permission to relieve bladder.  :D

Astronauts put finishing touches on lab (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/09/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/242104main_image_1103_800-600.jpg)

One of a series of digital still images documenting the Japanese Experiment Module, or JEM, also called Kibo, in its new home on the International Space Station, this view depicts Kibo's exterior, backdropped by solar array panels for the orbital outpost and one of its trusses.

The main Kibo lab was installed during the first spacewalk of this, the STS-124, mission. Credit: NASA

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080609-sts124-jemrms-02.jpg)

A still taken from a video camera outside the ISS, shows the Kibo lab's Japanese robotic arm outstretched to its full 33-foot (10-meter) length. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080608-kibo-wide-02.jpg)

Backdropped by the blackness of space, the Japanese Pressurized Module (foreground), the Japanese Logistics Module (top right), and a portion of the Harmony node of the ISS are featured in this image photographed by a crewmember during the STS-124 mission's second spacewalk on June 5, 2008. Credit: NASA.

The Phoenix is still having problems with the martian soil.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080609-phoenix-shake1-02.jpg)

A "before" image shows a sample of Martian soil resting on a screen over the opening to one of the eight ovens of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer instrument on Phoenix. After vibration, the soil slumped almost imperceptibly downhill. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080609-phoenix-shake2-02.jpg)

The "after" image was taken after about seven minutes of shaking a sample of Martian soil, which rests on a screen over the opening to one of the eight ovens of the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer instrument on Phoenix. The soil resting on the screen has slumped almost imperceptibly downhill, with a dark gap about 3 millimeters (one-tenth of an inch) wide opening at the top edge of the screen. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/242252main_RAC_014_blink-427.gif)

Engineers operating the Robotic Arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander are testing a revised method for delivering soil samples to laboratory instruments on Phoenix's deck now that researchers appreciate how clumpy the soil is at the landing site.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 11, 2008, 12:32 AM
Shuttle crew says goodbye, shuts hatch to space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/10/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080609-sts124-kibojlp-02.jpg)

The Kibo Japanese Pressurized Module and Kibo Japanese logistics module of the International Space Station are featured in this image photographed by a STS-124 crewmember while Space Shuttle Discovery is docked with the station. The blackness of space and Earth's horizon provide the backdrop for the scene on June 6, 2008. Credit: NASA.

Mars lander faces biggest challenge so far (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/10/phoenix.mars.ap/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 12, 2008, 12:36 AM
Shuttle begins journey back to Earth (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/11/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080611-sts124-undockB-02.jpg)

This still from a video camera on the exterior of the ISS shows the shuttle Discovery after its June 11, 2008 undocking during NASA's STS-124 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080611-sts124-undockA-02.jpg)

This still image from a video camera outside the shuttle Discovery captures the space station and its new Kibo lab (right with attic and robotic arm) after undocking on June 11, 2008 during NASA's STS-124 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

NASA's Phoenix Lander Has An Oven Full Of Martian Soil.

NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander has filled its first oven with Martian soil.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/244691main_phx20080611-427.jpg)

"We have an oven full," Phoenix co-investigator Bill Boynton of the University of Arizona, Tucson, said today. "It took 10 seconds to fill the oven. The ground moved."

Boynton leads the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer instrument, or TEGA, for Phoenix. The instrument has eight separate tiny ovens to bake and sniff the soil to assess its volatile ingredients, such as water.

The lander's Robotic Arm delivered a partial scoopful of clumpy soil from a trench informally called "Baby Bear" to the number 4 oven on TEGA last Friday, June 6, which was 12 days after landing.

A screen covers each of TEGA's eight ovens. The screen is to prevent larger bits of soil from clogging the narrow port to each oven so that fine particles fill the oven cavity, which is no wider than a pencil lead. Each TEGA chute also has a whirligig mechanism that vibrates the screen to help shake small particles through.

Only a few particles got through when the screen on oven number 4 was vibrated on June 6, 8 and 9.

Boynton said that the oven might have filled because of the cumulative effects of all the vibrating, or because of changes in the soil's cohesiveness as it sat for days on the top of the screen.

"There's something very unusual about this soil, from a place on Mars we've never been before," said Phoenix Principal Investigator Peter Smith of the University of Arizona. "We're interested in learning what sort of chemical and mineral activity has caused the particles to clump and stick together."

Plans prepared by the Phoenix team for the lander's activities on Thursday, June 12 include sprinkling Martian soil on the delivery port for the spacecraft's Optical Microscope and taking additional portions of a high-resolution color panorama of the lander's surroundings.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080611-sprinkle-test-02.jpg)

Phoenix used its robotic arm during the mission's 15th Martian day since landing (June 9, 2008) to test a "sprinkle" method for delivering small samples of soil to instruments on the lander deck. This image from the lander's Surface Stereo Imager shows the amount of soil delivered to the upper end the cover of the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA) by the time the test was finished. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M.

In other space news:

NASA launches telescope in search of gamma rays (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/11/telescope.launch.ap/)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/228084main_GLAST-m.jpg)

The GLAST spacecraft and Delta II rocket leap off the launch pad. Credit: Carleton Bailie for United Launch Alliance.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 13, 2008, 12:27 AM
Discovery Crew Prepares for Journey Home

After Wednesday’s undocking from the International Space Station, the members of the STS-124 crew began their 13th flight day with a morning off.

The astronauts aboard space shuttle Discovery answered questions from ESPN and ABC News in the afternoon. After the interview, the crew stowed the orbiter boom sensor system in the shuttle’s payload bay. They also powered down Discovery’s robot arm in preparation for landing Saturday.

LeRoy Cain, NASA's deputy shuttle program manager, said Discovery is in good shape to land here at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) on Saturday at 11:15 a.m. EDT (1515 GMT) after its crew's successful mission to add a new Japanese lab to the International Space Station (ISS).

First Sample Delivery to Mars Microscope

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/246063main_IPRW_SC164EFF897718135_12370R6M1_full_516-387.jpg)

The Robotic Arm on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander has just delivered the first sample of dug-up soil to the spacecraft's microscope station in this image taken by the Surface Stereo Imager during the mission's Sol 17 (June 12), or 17th Martian day after landing.

The scoop is positioned above the box containing key parts of Phoenix's Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer, or MECA, instrument suite. It has sprinkled a small amount of soil into a notch in the MECA box where the microscope's sample wheel is exposed. The wheel turns to present sample particles on various substrates to the Optical Microscope for viewing.

The scoop is about 8.5 centimeters (3.3 inches) wide. The top of the MECA box is 20 centimeters (7.9 inches) wide. This image has been lightened to make details more visible. Image NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M.

China Space Walk In October (http://www.livescience.com/blogs/author/leonarddavid/)

Inaugural spacewalk set for Oct (http://www.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2008-06/13/content_6758596.htm)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 13, 2008, 11:50 PM
NASA identifies shiny object trailing shuttle (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/13/shuttle.discovery/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080613-sts124-shuttleempt-02.jpg)

A view of the Shuttle Discovery soon after the shuttle and the International Space Station began their post-undocking relative separation on June 11, 2008. One of the Expedition 17 crewmembers recorded the photo with a digital still camera. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080613-sts124-debris-02.jpg)

This image shows an image of the lost Iconel metal seal clip (top left) seen by STS-124 astronauts aboard Discovery, as well as ground images and a diagram that illustrates its flight position. Credit: NASA.

Phoenix's Solar Panel and Robotic Arm

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/247277main_S_016IFF_CYLTST11E1C_RAAAM2_newer_516-387.jpg)

This image shows NASA’s Phoenix Mars Lander’s solar panel and the lander’s Robotic Arm with a sample in the scoop. The image was taken by the lander’s Surface Stereo Imager looking west during Phoenix’s Sol 16 (June 10, 2008), or the 16th Martian day after landing. The image was taken just before the sample was delivered to the Optical Microscope. This view is a part of the "mission success" panorama that will show the whole landing site in color. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080613-nano-buckets-02.jpg)

This image taken by the Optical Microscope on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander on Sol 17 (June 11, 2008) shows soil sprinkled from the lander's Robot Arm scoop onto a substrate that has been micromachined to produce different patterns of pegs and holes to capture the smallest particles in the Martian soil. The micromachined substrates are designed to tightly hold particles for imaging using the Atomic Force Microscope on Phoenix, which should be able to zoom in another 40 times beyond the magnification in this Optical Microscope image. For scale, each strip is 0.4 millimeter (0.016 inch) wide. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Imperial College London.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080613-micro-soil-02.jpg) 

This image of the Martian soil was taken by the Phoenix Mars Lander's optical microscope and shows the variety of colors, shapes and sizes of the soil particles. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 14, 2008, 01:17 PM
Shuttle back from mission with 'beautiful landing' (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/14/space.shuttle.ap/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/248094main_image_1108_946-710.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery touched down at 11:15 a.m. EDT, Saturday, June 14, 2008, at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. During the 13-day mission, Discovery and the crew of STS-124 delivered new components of Kibo, the Japanese Experiment Module, to the International Space Station and the Canadian-built Special Purpose Dextrous Manipulator, also known as Dextre, to the International Space Station. Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080614-sts124-landing-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery lands at Kennedy Space Center, Fla. June 14 at around 11:15 a.m. EDT. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080614-sts124-post-iss-02.jpg)

Backdropped by a blue and white part of Earth, the International Space Station is seen from the space shuttle Discovery as the two spacecraft begin their relative separation during the STS-124 mission. Undocking of the two spacecraft occurred on June 11, 2008. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 20, 2008, 07:14 PM
Mars lander finds bits of ice, scientists say (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/06/20/phoenix.mars.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080620-phoenix-sites-02.jpg)

This color image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 20th day of the mission, or Sol 19 (June 13, 2008), after the May 25, 2008, landing. This image shows one trench informally called "Dodo-Goldilocks" after two digs. White material, possibly ice, is located only at the upper portion of the trench. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080620-phoenix-snwwt-02.jpg)

NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander catches a glimpse of the "Snow White" trenches in the Martian arctic in this image released on June 20, 2008. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080620-phoenix-anim-02.gif)

This animation from two images taken by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander shows how what appears to be ice disappears over several days in the Martian arctic. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080620-phoenix-icecomp-02.jpg)

These images from the Phoenix Mars Lander show sublimation of ice in the trench informally called "Dodo-Goldilocks" between Sols 20 and 24 (June 15 and 18, 2008. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 20, 2008, 11:07 PM
I read this story today and just knew you'd post all about it Dale!  Pretty interesting find!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 29, 2008, 02:45 AM
Phoenix Scrapes to Icy Soil in Wonderland

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/255725main_SS031IOF898975455_13900RAT2_full.jpg)

This image was acquired by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander's Surface Stereo Imager on the 31st Martian day of the mission, or Sol 31 (June 26, 2008), after the May 25, 2008 landing. This image shows the trenches informally called "Snow White 1" (left), "Snow White 2" (right), and within the Snow White 2 trench, the smaller scraping area called "Snow White 3." The Snow White 3 scraped area is about 5 centimeters (2 inches) deep. The dug and scraped areas are within the diggiing site called "Wonderland."

The Snow White trenches and scraping prove that scientists can take surface soil samples, subsurface soil samples, and icy samples all from one unit. Scientists want to test samples to determine if some ice in the soil may have been liquid in the past during warmer climate cycles. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.

Clicky image below for a super high res shot. Man, this thing is huge!

(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0806/iss_sts124.jpg) (http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0806/iss_sts124_big.jpg)

The developing International Space Station (ISS) has changed its appearance again. Earlier this month, the Space Shuttle orbiter Discovery visited the ISS and added components that included Japan's Kibo Science Laboratory. The entire array of expansive solar panels is visible in this picture taken by the Discovery Crew after leaving the ISS to return to Earth. The world's foremost space outpost can be seen developing over the past several years by comparing the above image to past images. Also visible above are many different types of modules, a robotic arm, another impressive set of solar panels, and a supply ship. Construction began on the ISS in 1998.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 29, 2008, 03:45 PM
Pretty impressive work over the last 10 years, considering the shuttle was grounded for a while after Columbia.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 29, 2008, 04:15 PM
On our Canadian Discovery channel tonight is the Ron Howard's documentary In The Shadow Of The Moon (http://www.discoverychannel.ca/shows/showdetails.aspx?sid=9373) which was released last year & just an hr. before the show is Apollo 13: The Inside Story, 3 hrs. of space goodness.  ;D  8)

(http://www.footagevault.com/media/clients/in-the-shadow-of-the-moon_poster_318x480.jpg)

The ISS just towers over the Skylab. 

(http://media.nasaexplores.com/lessons/03-062/images/skylab23.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on June 29, 2008, 07:48 PM
You'll enjoy In the Shadow of the Moon.  We watched it last week and it was incredible.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 29, 2008, 11:12 PM
Indeed Matt, the show was awesome. Made me feel like 8 yrs. old again watching Armstrong coming down the ladder. For a single moment, the world was in awe.

(http://nssdc.gsfc.nasa.gov/planetary/lunar/images/a11tvarm.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 2, 2008, 01:32 AM
Phoenix Scrapes 'Almost Perfect' Icy Soil for Analysis

NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander enlarged the "Snow White" trench and scraped up little piles of icy soil on Saturday, June 28, the 33rd Martian day, or sol, of the mission. Scientists say that the scrapings are ideal for the lander's analytical instruments.

The robotic arm on Phoenix used the blade on its scoop to make 50 scrapes in the icy layer buried under subsurface soil. The robotic arm then heaped the scrapings into a few 10- to 20-cubic centimeter piles, or piles each containing between two and four teaspoonfuls. Scraping created a grid about two millimeters deep.

The scientists saw the scrapings in Surface Stereo Imager images on Sunday, June 29, agreed they had "almost perfect samples of the interface of ice and soil," and commanded the robotic arm to pick up some scrapings for instrument analysis.

The scoop will sprinkle the fairly fine-grained material first onto the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA). The instrument has tiny ovens to bake and sniff the soil to assess its volatile ingredients, such as water. It can determine the melting point of ice.

Phoenix's overall goals are to: dig to water frozen under subsurface soil, touch, examine, vaporize and sniff the soil and ice to discover the history of water on Mars, determine if the Martian arctic soil could support life, and study Martian weather from a polar perspective.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080620-phoenix-snwwt-02.jpg)

NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander catches a glimpse of the "Snow White" trenches in the Martian arctic in this image released on June 20, 2008. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/Texas A&M University.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080701-phoenix-ice-02.jpg)

This image taken by Phoenix's Robotic Arm Camera on Sunday, June 29, shows the trench known as "Snow White 5." The trench is about 1.5-to-1.9 inches (4-to-5 centimeters) deep, about 9 inches (24 centimeters) wide and 13 inches (33 centimeters) long. Snow White 5 is located in a patch of Martian soil near the center of a polygonal surface feature, nicknamed "Cheshire Cat." The digging site has been named "Wonderland." Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/University of Arizona/Max Planck Institute.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 2, 2008, 03:59 PM
Who knew? Solar system is 'dented,' not round (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/07/02/solarsystem.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080702-voyager-02.jpg)

Artist's rendering depicts the Voyager 2 spacecraft as it studies the outer limits of the heliosphere - a magnetic 'bubble' around the Solar System that is created by the solar wind. Scientists observed the magnetic bubble is not spherical, but pressed inward in the southern hemisphere. Credit: NASA/JPL.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 18, 2008, 02:04 PM
Video Sees Earth from Alien Perspective  (http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/20080718/sc_space/newvideoseesearthfromalienperspective)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080718-earth-transit-02.jpg)

This still from the video made by NASA's Deep Impact spacecraft shows the moon passing across the face of Earth. Credit: Donald J. Lindler, Sigma Space Corporation/GSFC; EPOCh/DIXI Science Teams.

Here are links to the two videos, one red-green-blue (http://www.nasa.gov/mov/260503main_red_green_blue2.mov) and the other infrared-green.blue (http://www.nasa.gov/mov/260502main_nir_green_blue2.mov).
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on July 24, 2008, 08:56 AM
NASA astronaut claims aliens have visited earth (http://www.news.com.au/story/0,23599,24070088-13762,00.html).

(http://www.oilempire.us/graphics/george_w_bush_space_alien.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 24, 2008, 09:58 AM
So Mitchell finally saw Kingdom of the Crystal Skull.  :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 28, 2008, 01:08 PM
First Virgin Galactic White Knight II Photos (http://gizmodo.com/5029950/live-at-the-virgin-galactic-white-knight-ii-unveil)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/WK2-DEBUT1-02.jpg)

The first WhiteKnightTwo mothership sits on a Mojave, Calif., runway with designer Burt Rutan and Sir Richard Branson nearby. Credit: Virgin Galactic.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080606-virgin-mother2-02.jpg)

Huge WhiteKnightTwo will jet suborbital SpaceShipTwo to high altitude for release. Credit: Virgin Galactic.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080606-virgin-mother3-02.jpg)

Flight profile of WhiteKnightTwo/SpaceShipTwo suborbital system. Credit: Virgin Galactic.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 1, 2008, 10:04 AM
Big news for the Phoenix Mars Lander...

NASA Spacecraft Confirms Martian Water, Mission Extended (http://phoenix.lpl.arizona.edu/07_31_pr.php)

TUCSON, Ariz. -- Laboratory tests aboard NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander have identified water in a soil sample. The lander's robotic arm delivered the sample Wednesday to an instrument that identifies vapors produced by the heating of samples.

"We have water," said William Boynton of the University of Arizona, lead scientist for the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer, or TEGA. "We've seen evidence for this water ice before in observations by the Mars Odyssey orbiter and in disappearing chunks observed by Phoenix last month, but this is the first time Martian water has been touched and tasted."

With enticing results so far and the spacecraft in good shape, NASA also announced operational funding for the mission will extend through Sept. 30. The original prime mission of three months ends in late August. The mission extension adds five weeks to the 90 days of the prime mission.

"Phoenix is healthy and the projections for solar power look good, so we want to take full advantage of having this resource in one of the most interesting locations on Mars," said Michael Meyer, chief scientist for the Mars Exploration Program at NASA Headquarters in Washington.

The soil sample came from a trench approximately 2 inches deep. When the robotic arm first reached that depth, it hit a hard layer of frozen soil. Two attempts to deliver samples of icy soil on days when fresh material was exposed were foiled when the samples became stuck inside the scoop. Most of the material in Wednesday's sample had been exposed to the air for two days, letting some of the water in the sample vaporize away and making the soil easier to handle.

"Mars is giving us some surprises," said Phoenix principal investigator Peter Smith of the University of Arizona. "We're excited because surprises are where discoveries come from. One surprise is how the soil is behaving. The ice-rich layers stick to the scoop when poised in the sun above the deck, different from what we expected from all the Mars simulation testing we've done. That has presented challenges for delivering samples, but we're finding ways to work with it and we're gathering lots of information to help us understand this soil."

Since landing on May 25, Phoenix has been studying soil with a chemistry lab, TEGA, a microscope, a conductivity probe and cameras. Besides confirming the 2002 finding from orbit of water ice near the surface and deciphering the newly observed stickiness, the science team is trying to determine whether the water ice ever thaws enough to be available for biology and if carbon-containing chemicals and other raw materials for life are present.

The mission is examining the sky as well as the ground. A Canadian instrument is using a laser beam to study dust and clouds overhead.

"It's a 30-watt light bulb giving us a laser show on Mars," said Victoria Hipkin of the Canadian Space Agency.

A full-circle, color panorama of Phoenix's surroundings also has been completed by the spacecraft.

"The details and patterns we see in the ground show an ice-dominated terrain as far as the eye can see," said Mark Lemmon of Texas A&M University, lead scientist for Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager camera. "They help us plan measurements we're making within reach of the robotic arm and interpret those measurements on a wider scale."

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080731-phoenix-target-02.jpg)

This image released July 31, 2008, shows the current trenches dug by NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander in the arctic Martian surface, with future trenches mapped as untouched boxes. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UA/Texas A & M.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080731-phoenix-met-02.jpg)

A laser beam from the Canadian-built lidar instrument on NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander can be seen in this contrast-enhanced sequence of 10 images taken by Phoenix's Surface Stereo Imager on July 26, 2008, during early Martian morning hours of the mission's 61st Martian day after landing. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UA/Texas A&M.

Also in space news, well no one around in our neck of the woods saw this today but for those that did... lucky! Check out the links below for vid's of the event caught on tape.  8)

Americans Watching Full Eclipse in Siberia (http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-54621)

Eclipse in Siberia (http://www.ireport.com/docs/DOC-54612)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Rob on August 3, 2008, 02:00 AM
Did this already get posted?  Is it legit?

Phoenix has Found Something More Compelling than Water: President Bush Informed (http://www.astroengine.com/?p=596)

The speculation in the posts as to what it would be are a fun read...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 3, 2008, 06:53 AM
Seems it might be legit, posted all over the net & the news.

Phoenix on Mars Life - Message From MECA (http://www.livescience.com/blogs/author/leonarddavid/)

White House Briefed On Potential For Mars Life (http://www.aviationweek.com/aw/generic/story.jsp?id=news/WH08018.xml&headline=White%20House%20Briefed%20On%20Potential%20For%20Mars%20Life&channel=space)

(http://www.biocrawler.com/w/images/f/f9/2001-monolith.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on August 3, 2008, 02:09 PM
Neat. I hope whatever it is will get some more money pumped into science.

On a side note, one of the cool things that happened at Comic-Con this year was that I got to hang out with a guy who does imaging for the Spitzer space telescope at JPL. We was pretty psyched that someone actually new that there was another space telescope aside from Hubble.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Smartypants1635 on August 3, 2008, 02:43 PM
Oh noes! Space bacteria. No immunity! I smell an epidemic on our hands  ;)

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 4, 2008, 06:14 PM
NASA: Reports of Martian-Life Announcement 'Bogus' (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,397326,00.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth Broem on August 4, 2008, 06:56 PM
Darn I was hoping for announcement of little green men's fossilized feces. 
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 6, 2008, 08:56 AM
Scientists puzzling over chemical found in Martian soil (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/08/05/mars.soil/index.html)

Phoenix Mars Team Opens Window On Scientific Process

August 5, 2008 -- Phoenix Mars mission scientists spoke today on research in progress concerning an ongoing investigation of perchlorate salts detected in soil analyzed by the wet chemistry laboratory aboard NASA's Phoenix Lander.

"Finding perchlorates is neither good nor bad for life, but it does make us reassess how we think about life on Mars," said Michael Hecht of NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., lead scientist for the Microscopy, Electrochemistry and Conductivity Analyzer (MECA), the instrument that includes the wet chemistry laboratory.

If confirmed, the result is exciting, Hecht said, "because different types of perchlorate salts have interesting properties that may bear on the way things work on Mars if -- and that's a big 'if ' -- the results from our two teaspoons of soil are representative of all of Mars, or at least a significant portion of the planet."

The Phoenix team had wanted to check the finding with another lander instrument, the Thermal and Evolved-Gas Analyzer (TEGA), which heats soil and analyzes gases driven off. But as that TEGA experiment was underway last week, speculative news reports surfaced claiming the team was holding back a major finding regarding habitability on Mars.

"The Phoenix project has decided to take an unusual step" in talking about the research when its scientists are only about half-way through the data collection phase and have not yet had time to complete data analysis or perform needed laboratory work, said Phoenix principal investigator Peter Smith of the University of Arizona, Tucson. Scientists are still at the stage where they are examining multiple hypotheses, given evidence that the soil contains perchlorate.

"We decided to show the public science in action because of the extreme interest in the Phoenix mission, which is searching for a habitable environment on the northern plains of Mars," Smith added. "Right now, we don't know whether finding perchlorate is good news or bad news for possible life on Mars."

Perchlorate is an ion, or charged particle, that consists of an atom of chlorine surrounded by four oxygen atoms. It is an oxidant, that is, it can release oxygen, but it is not a powerful one. Perchlorates are found naturally on Earth at such places as Chile's hyper-arid Atacama Desert. The compounds are quite stable and do not destroy organic material under normal circumstances. Some microorganisms on Earth are fueled by processes that involve perchlorates, and some plants concentrate the substance. Perchlorates are also used in rocket fuel and fireworks.

Perchlorate was discovered with a multi-use sensor that detects perchlorate, nitrate and other ions. The MECA team saw the perchlorate signal in a sample taken from the Dodo-Goldilocks trench on June 25, or Sol 30, or the 30th Martian day of the mission after landing, and again in another sample taken from the Snow White trench on July 6, or Sol 41.

When TEGA heated a sample of soil dug from the Dodo-Goldilocks trench on Sol 25 to high temperature, it detected an oxygen release, said TEGA lead scientist William Boynton of the University of Arizona. Perchlorate could be one of several possible sources of this oxygen, he said.

Late last week, when TEGA analyzed another sample, this one from the Snow White trench, the TEGA team looked for chlorine gas. The instrument detected none.

"Had we seen it, the identification of perchlorate would be absolutely clear, but in this run we did not see any chlorine gas. We may have been analyzing a perchlorate salt that doesn't release chlorine gas upon heating," Boynton said. "There's nothing in the TEGA data that contradicts MECA's finding of perchlorates."
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 11, 2008, 10:15 AM
I don't know if any of you are watching that new series on the Discovery Channel entitled "When We Left Earth: The NASA Missions".  It premiered tonight and it's awesome so far!

I'll just say you guys in the US are lucky bastards, our Canadian Disovery Channel is not showing it... yet. Not sure when they will tho.  :'(

This was on our Discovery Channel last night, the night I forgot to look at the TV guide.  :-[

While I was on my break at work late last night, I saw the episode "Landing the Eagle". One of the other guys at work who is also a space buff & I laughed as we were quoting lines from The Right Stuff, sure wrong missions but it was a hoot. "JIMP? Well what the HELL is a jimp?" etc...   :D

I will get another chance on the reruns this coming weekend.  ;D

Also coming to a night sky nere you...

Perseid Meteor Shower Peaks Tuesday Morning

The annual Perseid meteor shower is expected to put on a good display of shooting stars in the pre-dawn hours Tuesday.

The best views will be from rural locations away from light pollution, where up to 60 meteors per hour could be seen, weather permitting. Urban and suburban skywatchers can expect far fewer.

The Perseids are bits of debris left by comet Swift-Tuttle.The debris is like a river of small particles in space, and each year, Earth passes through it. As the bits zoom through our atmosphere at 37 miles per second (60 kps) they vaporize, creating the brilliant streaks of light. Most of the meteors are no larger than a grain of sand.

The shower is typically best between midnight and dawn, when the side of Earth you are standing on is plowing into the stream as our planet plunges through space in its orbit around the sun. It's similar to how bugs hit the windshield of a moving car but rarely smack into the rear bumper.

The annual shower begins as a trickle in mid-July and will continue to spark a handful of shooting stars for several nights to come. But Earth passes through the densest part of the stream Aug. 12 at around 7 a.m. ET (1100 GMT). The moon will set around 1:30 a.m. local time (regardless of your location), leaving the sky dark for a few hours of optimal meteor watching across much of North America.

"There should be plenty of meteors -- perhaps one or two every minute," said Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Cooke said the brightest Perseids can be seen from a city, but the majority are too faint and are visible only from rural locations.

Meteor watching is easy.

Find the darkest location you can, away from porch lights and other lighting.
Use a blanket or lounge chair to lie back and scan as much of the sky as possible.
Allow 15 minutes for your eyes to adjust to the darkness.
Binoculars and telescopes are of no use, as the meteors move too swiftly.

Expect the shooting stars to arrive in groups. While scientists forecast 1 per minute during peak hours, the pace in fact tends to be higher for brief periods with relative droughts in between. Patience is truly a virtue. The best time to watch, regardless of your location, is from 2 a.m. to dawn local time, but the best seats will be in the western half of North America where dark skies coincide with the peak activity.

The Perseids get their name from the constellation Perseus, from which they tend to emanate like spokes from the hub of a wheel. The meteors can make their appearance anywhere in the sky, however.

Perseus rises in the northeast around 9 a.m. local time. So Monday evening, avid skywatchers will head out after 9 p.m. in search of early Perseids that tend to fly along the horizon. These earthgrazers, as they are called, are rare but rewarding sights.

Unfortunatlly the weather here will be the *****, cloudy & rain.  :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 4, 2008, 02:10 AM
The Shuttle Atlantis is tentatively is scheduled to roll out Thursday from Kennedy Space Center's massive Vehicle Assembly Building to Launch Pad 39A, with its six-hour trek set to begin at 10 a.m. EDT. Managers will first meet at 5:30 a.m. for a weather briefing on the status of Tropical Storm Hanna before making the final decision. If changes in Hanna's path prevent tomorrow’s roll out, the move likely will be planned for Saturday morning.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/213834main_prerollout425.jpg)

Inside the massive Vehicle Assembly Building at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Atlantis awaits its trip to the launch pad. Photo credit: NASA.

This upcoming mission of STS-125 will be the final visit to the Hubble Space Telescope.

STS-125: The Final Visit (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/hst_sm4/overview.html)

Preparing to rescue Hubble (http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2008/09/preparing_to_rescue_hubble.html)

With just a 10 missions left in the shuttle program before its retirement in 2010, On July 7, 2008, NASA announced the future launch dates of the remaining eight missions in 2009 and 2010.

SHUTTLE FLIGHTS IN 2009

February 12: space shuttle Discovery (STS-119 / 15A)

“Discovery will kick off a five-flight 2009 with its 36th mission to deliver the final pair of U.S. solar arrays to be installed on the starboard end of the station's truss. The truss serves as the backbone support for external equipment and spare components, including the Mobile Base System. Lee Archambault will command the 14-day flight that will include four planned spacewalks. Joining him will be pilot Tony Antonelli and mission specialists John Phillips, Steve Swanson, Joseph Acaba, Richard Arnold and Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency astronaut Koichi Wakata. Wakata will replace Sandy Magnus on the station as a flight engineer. STS-119 marks the 28th shuttle flight to the station.”

May 15: space shuttle Endeavour (STS-127 / 2JA)

“Endeavour sets sail on its 23rd mission with the Japanese Kibo Laboratory's Exposed Facility and Experiment Logistics Module Exposed Section, the final permanent components of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency's contribution to the station program. During the 15-day mission, Endeavour's crew will perform five spacewalks and deliver six new batteries for the P6 truss, a spare drive unit for the Mobile Transporter and a spare boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna. Mark Polansky will be Endeavour's commander with Doug Hurley as pilot. Mission specialists will be Christopher Cassidy, Tom Marshburn, Dave Wolf, Tim Kopra and Canadian Space Agency astronaut Julie Payette. Kopra will become a station flight engineer replacing Koichi Wakata, who will return home with the STS-127 crew. It will be the 29th shuttle flight to the station.”

July 30: space shuttle Atlantis (STS-128 / 17A)

“Atlantis launches on its 31st flight, an 11-day mission carrying science and storage racks to the station. In the payload bay will be a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module holding science and storage racks. Three spacewalks are planned to remove and replace a materials processing experiment outside the European Space Agency's Columbus module and return an empty ammonia tank assembly. The mission includes the rotation of astronaut Nicole Stott for Tim Kopra, who will return to Earth with the shuttle crew. The remaining crew members have yet to be named. STS-128 marks the 30th shuttle flight dedicated to station assembly and outfitting.”

October 15: space shuttle Discovery (STS-129 / ULF-3)

"Discovery’s 37th mission will focus on staging spare components outside the station. The 15-day flight includes at least three spacewalks. The payload bay will carry two large External Logistics Carriers holding two spare gyroscopes, two nitrogen tank assemblies, two pump modules, an ammonia tank assembly, a spare latching end effector for the station's robotic arm, a spare trailing umbilical system for the Mobile Transporter and a high-pressure gas tank. Canadian Space Agency astronaut Bob Thirsk will return home aboard Discovery with its crew, which has yet to be named. STS-129 marks the 31st shuttle mission devoted to station assembly.”

December 10: space shuttle Endeavour (STS-130 / 20A)

“Endeavour will close 2009 with its 24th mission to deliver the final connecting node, Node 3, and the Cupola, a robotic control station with six windows around its sides and another in the center that provides a 360-degree view around the station. At least three spacewalks are planned during the 11-day mission. The 32nd station assembly mission by a shuttle does not yet have a crew named.”

February 11: space shuttle Atlantis (STS-131 / 19A)

“Atlantis begins its 32nd mission as the first flight in 2010, carrying a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with science racks that will be transferred to laboratories of
the station. The 11-day mission will include at least three spacewalks to attach a spare ammonia tank assembly outside the station and return a European experiment that has been outside the Columbus module. It will be the 33rd shuttle mission to the station. The crew has yet to be named.”

April 8: space shuttle Discovery (STS-132 / ULF-4)

“Discovery’s 38th mission will carry an integrated cargo carrier to deliver maintenance and assembly hardware, including spare parts for space station systems. In addition, the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, a Mini Research Module, will be permanently attached to the bottom port of the Zarya module. The Russian module also will carry U.S. pressurized cargo. The first Russian Mini Research Module to go to the station is scheduled to launch on a Russian rocket in the summer of 2009.”

“Additionally, at least three spacewalks are planned to stage spare components outside the station, including six spare batteries, a boom assembly for the Ku-band antenna and spares for the Canadian Dextre robotic arm extension. A radiator, airlock and European robotic arm for the Russian Multi-purpose Laboratory Module also are payloads on the flight. The laboratory module is scheduled for launch on a Russian rocket in 2011. The mission marks the 34th mission to the station. The STS-132 crew has yet to be named.”

May 31: space shuttle Endeavour (STS-133 / ULF-5)

“Endeavour’s 25th mission will carry critical spare components that will be placed on the outside of the station. Those will include two S-band communications antennas, a high-pressure gas tank, additional spare parts for Dextre and micrometeoroid debris shields. At least three spacewalks are planned to be carried out by the crew, which has yet to be named. The 15-day mission will be the 35th to the station.”

For the NASA space shuttle launch manifest, visit International Space Station: Consolidated Launch Manifest .

In addition, the U.S. House of Representatives has allocated money for one additional space shuttle flight to allow a previously canceled major International Space Station component to be flown: the European CERN Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer, a particle physics experiment that will be mounted outside of the space station so that it can search for various types of unusual matter by measuring cosmic rays.

If flown in the fall of 2010, the mission will be designated STS-134 and probably flown by space shuttle Discovery.

If you have not seen this Trailer for upcoming Hubble Service Mission (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=63zUtmhHgSE), please do so. This is an important mission to save the Hubble Space Telescope (http://hubblesite.org/) that has given us an awesome look into our backyard.  8)

(http://bbsnews.net/bbsn_photos/topics/NASA/hubble_space_telescope.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 4, 2008, 09:12 AM
At least I hear that they're reconsidering mothballing the shuttle fleet in 2010.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 4, 2008, 08:43 PM
Will see if the shuttle gets the extension, the Russians are holding the cards.  :-\

Get HR pics of the roll out, enjoy.  :)

Media Gallery Space Shuttle Atlantis  (http://mediaarchive.ksc.nasa.gov/search.cfm?cat=4)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 7, 2008, 01:55 AM
ESA spacecraft completes flyby of Steins asteroid  (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20080905/ap_on_sc/sci_asteroid_flyby)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080906-steins-flyby-02.jpg)

The 5-km wide Asteroid Steins seen from a distance of 800 km, taken from two different perspectives. At the top of the asteroid (as shown in this image), a large crater, approximately 1.5-km in size, can be seen. Scientists were amazed that the asteroid survived the impact that was responsible for the crater. Credit: ESA ©2008 MPS for OSIRIS Team.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/040311_rosetta_flyby_04.jpg)

Illustration of asteroid with Rosetta approaching in the distance. Credit: ESA/AOES Medialab.

Check out the actual animation of Steins getting closer look.  8)

Steins: A diamond in the sky (http://www.esa.int/esaCP/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 16, 2008, 09:21 AM
Interesting article about plans for a Lunar Base. (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/26725440/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 16, 2008, 09:30 AM
Moonbase... Nuclear! I have a bad feeling about this!  :D

(http://www.space1999.net/catacombs/main/images/space/b/spb0268.jpg)

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on September 16, 2008, 09:44 AM
Why do they need another moon base? Is the one on the dark side of the moon getting outdated?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 17, 2008, 04:57 AM
China counts down to space launch (http://www.reuters.com/article/scienceNews/idUSPEK35483520080912)

Fighter pilot to be China's first space walker (http://afp.google.com/article/ALeqM5jDpDAAlLf-2XQwpC3utlPxBOfxQw)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 23, 2008, 09:03 AM
China set to launch third manned space mission (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/09/22/china.space.mission.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080922-shenzhou-tower-02.jpg)

The Shenzhou-7 manned spaceship, the Long-March II-F rocket and the escape tower being transferred to the launch pad. Credit: AP Photo/Xinhua, Li Gang.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080922-shenzhou-rocket-02.jpg)

In this photo distributed by the official Chinese news agency, Xinhua, the Shenzhou-7 manned spaceship, the Long-March II-F rocket and the escape tower are vertically transferred to the launch pad at the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu province on Saturday September 20, 2008. The transfer made the final stage of the launching preparation, Xinhua said. Credit: AP Photo/Xinhua, Li Gang.

Something you don't see everyday.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080923-shuttles-pad-02.jpg)

The shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the pads at the same time. Endeavour will stand by in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during Atlantis' upcoming mission to repair the Hubble Space Telescope, targeted to launch Oct. 10, 2008. Credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 23, 2008, 09:56 AM
Wow! Awesome picture. I've never seen two set for launch before.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on September 23, 2008, 10:12 AM
Do they usually roll out the shuttle that far in advance of the launch?  Especially given the time of year, wouldn't they be concerned with Hurricanes, etc.  I'd think they would roll them out at most a week before.  Then again, do they have the capacity to have both those shuttles inside at this point, IIRC from the tour I went on about 15 years ago, I think there is only one assembly facility where they could shelter the shuttle.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 23, 2008, 10:57 AM
Yeah, that pic is sweet. Reminds me of the X-71 Shuttle's from the flick Armageddon, both waiting for the launch.

Here's a high rez pic of that shot. Just clicky the picture.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/276863main_image_1179_800-600.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/276866main_image_1179_1600-1200.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis (foreground) sits on Launch Pad A and Endeavour on Launch Pad B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. At the left of each shuttle are the open rotating service structures with the payload changeout rooms revealed. The rotating service structures provide protection for weather and access to the shuttle.

For the first time since July 2001, two shuttles are on the launch pads at the same time. Endeavour will stand by at pad B in the unlikely event that a rescue mission is necessary during Atlantis' upcoming STS-125 mission to repair NASA's Hubble Space Telescope. The missions is slated to launch Oct. 10.

After Endeavour is cleared from its duty as a rescue spacecraft, it will be moved to Launch Pad 39A for its STS-126 mission to the International Space Station. That flight is targeted for launch Nov. 12. Image Credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.

Another neat pic, a panorama view showing both shuttle's & the vehicle assembly building. Clicky pic.  8)

(http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts126/080920twoshuttles/pano2_tn.jpg) (http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts126/080920twoshuttles/pano2.jpg)

Do they usually roll out the shuttle that far in advance of the launch?  Especially given the time of year, wouldn't they be concerned with Hurricanes, etc.  I'd think they would roll them out at most a week before.  Then again, do they have the capacity to have both those shuttles inside at this point, IIRC from the tour I went on about 15 years ago, I think there is only one assembly facility where they could shelter the shuttle.
 

The Vehicle Assembly Building is bloody huge & can hold alot, even 2 external fuel tanks, & the whole ball of wax.  ;)

The Space Shuttle: The Vehicle Assembly Building (http://www.cdli.ca/CITE/sts_assembly.htm)

(http://www.cdli.ca/CITE/vab_5.jpg)  (http://www.cdli.ca/CITE/vab_3.gif)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on September 23, 2008, 11:02 AM
Thanks DSJ, I was hoping that someone at NASA had thought that one through :)  Like I said, I couldn't recall all that well.  Those are some pretty dramatic and beautiful pictures.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 25, 2008, 10:13 AM
Been sitting here watching the live coverage of the Shenzhou-7 spacecraft launch on the TV channel CCTV-4 (http://wwitv.com/portal.htm?http://wwitv.com/television/index.html?http://wwitv.com/tv_channels/2078.htm) server from China.

What an awesome launch, looked lika a plastic model sitting there then she fired up...  8)

You can catch the launch on youtube here (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lmo3Okh6uHg).

I have been also following the launch on the NASASpaceFlight.com (http://forum.nasaspaceflight.com/index.php?topic=5137.0) forum where members have been watching closely & posting some great screen caps of the mission. It's a big thread & worth looking through.

Can't wait for the spacewalk, good luck to them.  :)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080925-shenzhou7-launch-02.jpg)

The Shenzhou 7 manned spacecraft launches from the Jiuquan Satellite Launch Center in northwest China's Gansu province on Thursday Sept. 25, 2008, in this photo distributed by the official Chinese news agency, Xinhua. Credit: AP Photo/Xinhua, Li Gang.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 27, 2008, 04:18 AM
I'm following the live broadcast of the spacewalk, great feed from cctv.com English Version (http://www.cctv.com/english/special/Shenzhou7/01/index.shtml).

Depressurization of the orbital module is taking place, Zhai Zhigang wearing a Chinese made Feitian spacesuit will be making the space walk & Liu Boming will be wearing a Russian suit & will stay in the orbital module while Jing Haipeng will stay in the re-entry module.

When Col Zhai steps out, attached to the orbiting module by two wires, he will retrieve a test sample of solid fuel lubricant attached to the outside of the craft in order to give the test walk realism. He will then release a small satellite to circle and take photographs of the mission.

No major experiments are planned: the main purpose of the flight is to prepare the technical skills necessary, including docking two orbiters together, one day to develop a Chinese space station.

The space walk is planned to take between 20 minutes and half an hour. The main risks are the difficulties of maintaining pressure in the orbiting module, and malfunction in the spacesuit.

The taikonauts spent 10 hrs putting on the suits.

Depressurization has been completed & they are about to open hatch!  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 27, 2008, 05:45 AM
Holy crap! They did it, it was a short spacewalk but wow! Kudo's China. (http://i232.photobucket.com/albums/ee6/bustedupcowgirl/Smilies/Smilies%20With%20Signs/bravo.gif)

Enjoy the screen grab's, I really like the 2nd taikonaut popping out of the orbiting module & the flag waving.  ;D

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/OutsideSpacecraft.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s1.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s2.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s3.jpg) 

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s4.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s5.jpg) 

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s6.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s7.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s8.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s9Flag.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s16.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s17.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s10.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s11.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s12.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s13.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s14.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/s15.jpg)

The Shenzhou 7 spacewalk is up on youtube.

ShenzhouVII Space Walk ★part 1★ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7W8U1KMm7Gc)

ShenzhouVII Space Walk ★part 2★
 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iZNCMp20ELI)
ShenzhouVII Space Walk ★part 3★ (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1bLKv5uCHuU)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 28, 2008, 09:05 AM
China astronauts return to Earth triumphant (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/09/28/china.space.astronauts.return/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080928-landing-capsule-02.jpg)

The Shenzhou 7 reentry module, after landing Sept. 28 on the plains of Inner Mongolia. Credit: CCTV/Xinhua.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080928-crew-wave-02.jpg)

The three Shenzhou 7 crewmembers, Zhai Zhigang, Liu Boming, and Jing Haipeng, after landing in Inner Mongolia Sept. 28. Credit: CCTV/Xinhua.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 28, 2008, 10:31 AM
May China's success motivate congress to increase funding to NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 29, 2008, 02:52 AM
SpaceX launches 1st commercial rocket into orbit (http://ap.google.com/article/ALeqM5iF-6npNsKa0n_7aLm8tJvuHWt4JgD93G1LC00)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080928-falcon1-launch4-02.jpg)

SpaceX's fourth Falcon 1 rocket successfully launches into orbit from the Kwajalein Atoll on the Pacific Ocean late Sunday, Sept. 28, 2008. Credit: SpaceX.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080928-falcon1-launch4B-02.jpg)

This still from a video camera attached to SpaceX's fourth Falcon 1 rocket reveals the limb of the Earth as the booster's second stage successfully reached orbit on Sept. 28, 2008. Credit: SpaceX.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080802-spacex-fail-02.jpg)

A view from SpaceX's third Falcon 1 rocket shortly before video transmission terminated two minutes and 20 seconds into the third test flight on August 2, 2008. A SpaceX spokesperson said that mission control had reported an "anomaly." Credit: SpaceX.

More on SpaceX can be found at spacex.com (http://www.spacex.com/) check it out, cool video of the launch & the orbit.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 29, 2008, 02:17 PM
Hubble telescope fails, NASA may delay shuttle (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/09/29/shuttle.hubble.ap/index.html)

CAPE CANAVERAL, Fla. (AP) — The Hubble Space Telescope has stopped sending science data, forcing NASA to regroup and possibly delay the space shuttle mission planned in just two weeks to upgrade the telescope.

The system that failed Saturday night means the telescope is unable to capture and beam down the data needed to produce its stunning deep space images, officials said Monday.

A team of astronauts has been preparing to blast off on the space shuttle Atlantis on Oct. 14 to make other repairs and upgrades. But the data transmission breakdown is a brand new problem.

NASA is reviewing whether the mission should be delayed a couple of months so that plans can be made to send up a replacement part for the failed component, said NASA spokesman Michael Curie.

It would take time to test and qualify the old replacement part and train the astronauts to install it in the telescope, Curie said. NASA also would have to work out new mission details for the astronauts who have trained for two years to carry out five Hubble repair spacewalks.

"The teams are always looking at contingencies, and this is just something that has cropped up we have the ability to deal with. They're just trying to decide what direction we want to go," he said.

There is a backup channel for the science instruments' command and data-handling system, and NASA may be able to activate it successfully so that data transmission resumes, Curie said. But if NASA relies solely on the backup channel, there would be no other options if it malfunctioned.

"They're looking at all the different possibilities," he added.

Curie stressed that the telescope is not in trouble; it's just that it cannot send science information to ground controllers. That means NASA is unable to receive the dramatic pictures Hubble is known for.

The mission by Atlantis and a seven-person crew would be the fifth and final servicing mission to Hubble.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 30, 2008, 12:17 AM
NASA pushes Hubble's makeover back to February (http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/front/6030998.html)

NASA has delayed the last shuttle mission to the Hubble Space Telescope until early 2009 in order to repair a broken device that is blocking the orbital observatory from sending its iconic images of the cosmos back to Earth, agency officials said late Monday.

Canadian laser gadget finds snow in Martian sky (http://www.canada.com/topics/news/national/story.html?id=7a53a541-b2b8-4118-9344-c12eab5d8982)

Phoenix Mars Lander "Sees" Falling Snow (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2008/09/080929-mars-snow.html)

September 29, 2008.
NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander has detected snow falling from Martian clouds. Spacecraft soil experiments also have provided evidence of past interaction between minerals and liquid water, processes that occur on Earth.

A laser instrument designed to gather knowledge of how the atmosphere and surface interact on Mars has detected snow from clouds about 4 kilometers (2.5 miles) above the spacecraft's landing site. Data show the snow vaporizing before reaching the ground.

"Nothing like this view has ever been seen on Mars," said Jim Whiteway, of York University, Toronto, lead scientist for the Canadian-supplied Meteorological Station on Phoenix. "We'll be looking for signs that the snow may even reach the ground."

Phoenix experiments also yielded clues pointing to calcium carbonate, the main composition of chalk, and particles that could be clay. Most carbonates and clays on Earth form only in the presence of liquid water.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 30, 2008, 09:31 AM
At least we have Spitzer up there to make up for the loss of Hubble.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 2, 2008, 11:18 AM
Just want to throw this out here, looks like this may finally be closed.

Fossett plane found, sheriff says (http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/10/02/steve.fossett.search/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 7, 2008, 12:29 PM
Mercury, up close and personal: Photos revealed (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/10/07/mercury.mission/index.html)

Messenger Images of Mercury (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/messenger/multimedia/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081007-messenger-flyby2B-02.jpg)

This view is one of the first from the MESSENGER probe's Oct. 6, 2008 flyby of Mercury. The bright crater south of the center of the image is Kuiper, identified on images from the Mariner 10 mission in the 1970s. For most of the terrain east of Kuiper, toward the limb (edge) of the planet, the views are the first ever of that portion of Mercury. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/CIW.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081007-messenger-flyby2D-02.jpg)

This portion of Mercury's surface was previously imaged under different lighting conditions by Mariner 10, but this new MESSENGER image mosaic is the highest-resolution color imaging ever acquired of any portion of Mercury's surface from its Oct. 6, 2008 flyby. The largest impact feature at the top of the image is about 133 kilometers (83 miles) in diameter and is named Polygnotus. Credit: NASA/JHUAPL/CIW.

Keep checking the link below for more added pics from this mission.  8)

Mercury as Never Seen Before (http://messenger.jhuapl.edu/gallery/sciencePhotos/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on October 7, 2008, 12:36 PM
Wow!  Amazing images Dale.  Thanks for posting them!


On a related note, I did a little reading online about the early Soviet space program.  Specifically about the lost Cosmonauts.  Jim Oberg of NASA has apparently done some writing on the topic.  However even with the demise of the Soviet Union, the secrets of the Soviet space program are still under lock and key.  But the reports of a Soviet launch in the 1960's that failed to go into orbit and went directly into deep space were somewhat startling.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: jedipurge on October 7, 2008, 06:02 PM

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081007-messenger-flyby2B-02.jpg)


WOW the crater at, what I'd guess to be the N. Pole, almost looks like it "spiderwebbed" the planet with all the "cracks" that look to originating from that spot.

Wow!  Amazing images Dale.  Thanks for posting them!


On a related note, I did a little reading online about the early Soviet space program.  Specifically about the lost Cosmonauts.  Jim Oberg of NASA has apparently done some writing on the topic.  However even with the demise of the Soviet Union, the secrets of the Soviet space program are still under lock and key.  But the reports of a Soviet launch in the 1960's that failed to go into orbit and went directly into deep space were somewhat startling.


Where did you read that Nick?  Sounds very interesting.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on October 7, 2008, 07:39 PM
I'll have to dig it up.  But Oberg (a longtime NASA guy) did a piece as early as the 1970's about two brothers in northern Italy who were amateur radio enthusiasts.  Somehow they figured out how to receive the transmissions from the Soviet space craft, and monitored the exchanges between the Cosmonauts in the spacecraft and the ground.  NASA caught word of this through the Italian intelligence agency and CIA.  And they wound up consulting with the brothers on how to receive the transmissions.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on October 7, 2008, 08:06 PM
Check out this article : http://www.forteantimes.com/features/articles/1302/lost_in_space.html (http://www.forteantimes.com/features/articles/1302/lost_in_space.html) for more on the Judica-Cordiglia brothers and what they may have recorded
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 8, 2008, 04:18 AM
That's a good artile Nick, well worth the read. Amazing how much was coverd up back in the day & stuff we still don't know about. After reading it I looked up Baikonur found a few good links.

The Baikonur Cosmodrome (http://www.boston.com/bigpicture/2008/09/the_baikonur_cosmodrome.html)

Baikonur Cosmodrome - Space Launch Facility (http://indiansundew.blogspot.com/2007/10/baikonur-cosmodrome-russia.html)

1967: Russian cosmonaut dies in space crash (http://news.bbc.co.uk/onthisday/hi/dates/stories/april/24/newsid_2523000/2523019.stm)

Remember this baby?

(http://www.cosmos.1.bg/snimki/buran/Buran_landing.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 14, 2008, 09:26 PM
Just finished watching Space Shuttle Disaster (http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/nova/columbia/) on NOVA about the shuttle Columbia that disintegrated during re-entry into Earth's atmosphere. The show repeats again tonight, well worth the watch.

Also some collective works of Wernher von Braun (http://www.bonhams.com/cgi-bin/public.sh/pubweb/publicSite.r?sContinent=USA&screen=lotdetailsNoFlash&iSaleItemNo=4039095&iSaleNo=16116&iSaleSectionNo=1) will be auctioned off at Bonhams auction agency tomorrow.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081014-spaceship-02.jpg)

Plan of an orbit-to-orbit space ship for a trip around the moon, drawn by von Braun. Credit: Bonhams.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081014-rocket-02.jpg)

Wernher von Braun's sketch of a three-stage rocket used to transport a satellite to orbit, to be auctioned off by Bonhams. Credit: Bonhams.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 15, 2008, 07:47 PM
Holy crap! The Wernher von Braun works sold for $132,000 inclusive of buyer's premium, the estimated value was between $15,000 & $25,000.  :o

On October 1st this year, NASA celebrated it's 50th anniversary. Next year, NASA celebrates the 40th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing. Check out the The Apollo Missions: 40 Years Later Apollo Program; NASA's giant leap to the moon (http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/apollo40/) which NASA will update intime but for now, they have video clips of Remembering Gus Grissom, Ed White & Roger Chaffee (Apollo 1) & The Wally, Walt & Donn Show (click the video for Apollo 7 history).  ;)

For now, check out what the Earth looks like at night. The image below is actually a composite of hundreds of pictures made by the orbiting DMSP satellites. Clicky pic for high rez image.

(http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0810/earthlights2_dmsp.jpg) (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0810/earthlights2_dmsp_big.jpg)

Oh, & check out the The Moon Landing. The Lost Tapes (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mfmWgglkGHQ&feature=related). (Language Warning).  :D  ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on October 15, 2008, 09:08 PM
That picture is the standard desktop walpaper on AF computer.

Love the video btw.   ;D

Also...we forgot to celebrate NASA's 50th birthday on 1 October.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 16, 2008, 01:58 AM
Yeah, that video clip is a hoot!  ;D

While digging through my stuff in storage, I found a few things I collected back in the day. I found a collection of VHS tapes that I bought from the Easton Press back in 1988. This set is 5 binders containing 2 VHS per so 10 tapes in total. These are America's Achievements In Space, some tapes were veiwed & others are still sealed in shrinkwrap.

Vol 1 New View of Space, Friendship 7.
Vol 2 Apollo 8, Genini 4, Mariner 9.
Vol 3 Voyagers, Gemini 8, Whos Out There.
Vol 4 Columbia 1, Apollo 9,Pioneer 10.
Vol 5 Apollo 11, Freedom 7,Gemini 12.
Vol 6 Universe, Apollo 13, Columbia 2.
Vol 7 Skylab, Faith 7, Apollo 15.
Vol 8 Apollo 16, Mars, Apollo-Soyuz.
Vol 9 Apollo 17, Mariner 10, Shuttles 5-8.
Vol 10 Mercury, Gemini, Apollo.

Here's a pic of the set that I grabbed off the bay.

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Random/AmericasAchievementsInSpace.jpg)

That will give me something to watch for Apollo's 40th anniversary.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 4, 2008, 01:42 AM
Just want to throw this out here, looks like this may finally be closed.

Fossett plane found, sheriff says (http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/10/02/steve.fossett.search/index.html)

Closure can finally be made... RIP Steve.  :'(

Bones are Fossett's, DNA testing shows (http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/11/03/fossett.bones/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 4, 2008, 01:48 AM
Endeavour is set to blast off next week.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081103-sts126-sunset-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour stands poised for space soon after being moved to Launch Pad 39A for the launch of STS-126 on Nov. 14, 2008. Credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.

During the 15-day mission, astronauts will conduct four space walks, including operations to clean and service machinery that has been jammed for a year and interfered with the operations of the space station's solar panels.

Endeavour's payload will include an extra toilet and sleeping quarters for the space station to expand the living space on the station to support six crew members. Currently, there is enough room for only three astronauts.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 11, 2008, 07:49 AM
Phoenix Lander silent; Mars mission over, NASA says (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/10/nasa.mars.lander/index.html)

Quote
The end seems to have finally come for NASA's Phoenix Mars Lander mission at the planet's north pole, scientists said Monday.

"At this time we're pretty convinced that the vehicle is no longer available for us to use," said Phoenix project manager Barry Goldstein of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif.

"We knew this would happen eventually," Goldstein added.

Mission controllers lost touch with the lander on Nov. 2. That "was actually the last time we actually heard form Phoenix," Goldstein said. The spacecraft has been studying the arctic surface of the red planet for just over five months, since landing there May 25.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on November 11, 2008, 09:03 AM
Just want to throw this out here, looks like this may finally be closed.

Fossett plane found, sheriff says (http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/10/02/steve.fossett.search/index.html)

Closure can finally be made... RIP Steve.  :'(

Bones are Fossett's, DNA testing shows (http://www.cnn.com/2008/US/11/03/fossett.bones/index.html)

My neighbor works for the NTSB. Had he not elected to have his shoulder worked on, he would have been out there looking for plane parts and piecing them together in the hanger.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on November 11, 2008, 09:24 AM

(http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0810/earthlights2_dmsp.jpg) (http://antwrp.gsfc.nasa.gov/apod/image/0810/earthlights2_dmsp_big.jpg)


That makes for an interesting study in global energy consumption doesn't it?  Kinda puts us in perspective....
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 13, 2008, 10:35 AM
Shuttle Endeavour's mission STS-126: The ISS renovation project (http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2008/11/13/f-shuttle-sts126.html)

It's the Home Improvement show on this mission folks.  :D

Endeavour is slated to launch toward the space station Friday at 7:55 p.m. EST (0055 Nov. 15 GMT) on a planned 15-day mission.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081112-sts126-pad-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour stands atop Launch Pad 39A for the planned Nov. 14, 2008 launch of its STS-126 mission to the ISS. Credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 13, 2008, 09:41 PM
Astronomers capture first images of new planets (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/13/new.planets/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081113-fomalhautb-02.jpg)

This 2006 Hubble Space Telescope optical image shows the belt of dust and debris (bright oval) surrounding the star Fomalhaut and the planet (inset) that orbits the star every 872 years and sculpts the inner edge of the belt. Credit: Paul Kalas/UC Berkeley; STScI.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081113-hr8799-02.jpg)

The three exoplanets (red dots in the right panel) are shown orbiting HR 8799, whose residual light is shown as the multi-colored specks in the center of the right panel. An infrared image of one of the planets, which lies at 38 AU from the star, is shown in the right panel. Credit: National Research Council Canada.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081113-hr8799-system-02.jpg)

This 3D representation of the three planets orbiting the star HR 8799 shows the system is located 90 degrees away from the Milky Way galactic center, lower than the sun. (All orbital diameters are greatly exaggerated.) Credit: 2MASS/UMass/IPAC-Caltech/NASA/NSF.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on November 13, 2008, 10:46 PM
Nice to see these force fed images of what we're "allowed" to see.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on November 14, 2008, 07:48 PM
Endeavour launches in a little under 10 minutes from the Kennedy Space Center.  Night launches are always very impressive to watch.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 14, 2008, 08:57 PM
Shuttle on its way to space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/14/shuttle.endeavor/index.html)

(http://graphics8.nytimes.com/images/2008/11/14/science/15shuttle_600.JPG)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 14, 2008, 09:15 PM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081114-sts126-launchgo-02B.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour races toward space in a shower of clouds and steam from NASA's Kennedy Space Center. Credit: NASA/KSC.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 14, 2008, 10:44 PM
Launch on youtube.

Space Shuttle Endeavour Blasts Into Night Sky (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EsZZUdzL-Vs)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 15, 2008, 03:54 PM
NASA astronauts to drink their own urine today? (http://news.cnet.com/8301-17852_3-10098084-71.html)

Yummy!  :-X

Clicky pic for high rez image.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/290722main_image_1220_946-710.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/290725main_08pd3706_full.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 15, 2008, 07:27 PM
Shuttle inspects heat shield on way to space post (http://www.reuters.com/article/topNews/idUSTRE4AD3MB20081115)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/290775main_01_port_omspod_wide.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/290777main_02_port_omspod_close.jpg)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081115-sts126-debris-02.jpg)

Ground-based cameras caught this view of what appears to be a strip of thermal blanket insulation falling away during the shuttle Endeavour's Nov. 14, 2008 launch on the STS-126 mission. Credit: NASA.

Docking is scheduled for 5:13 p.m. EST Sunday & if all goes as planned, Endeavour is scheduled to undock on the U.S. Thanksgiving holiday Nov. 27. After now-routine late inspections using the robotic arm and extension boom, Endeavour is targeted for a landing back at Kennedy on 2:10 p.m. EST Nov. 29.

No report on the urine sampling yet.  :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 16, 2008, 09:33 PM
Endeavour docks with space station (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/16/shuttle.endeavour.docking/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081114-sts126-issdock-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour approaches the International Space Station for a Nov. 16, 2008 docking during the STS-126 mission. The end of the station's Japanese Kibo lab and robotic arm appears at bottom left. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 17, 2008, 09:58 PM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081117-sts126-leonardo-02.jpg)

The Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module is shown attached to the International Space Station after its Nov. 17, 2008 installation during NASA's STS-126 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

Nasa reports that the heat shelid is in good condition.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 18, 2008, 09:47 PM
Astronaut loses tool bag during spacewalk (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/18/endeavour.spacewalk/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081118-sts126-eva1tank-02.jpg)

STS-126 spacewalker Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper hauls an empty nitrogen tank the size of an office desk from the ISS to the shuttle Endeavour with the blue Earth and solar arrays in the background on Nov. 18, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081118-sts126-eva1-toolbag-02.jpg)

An equipment bag drifts away from spacewalker Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper as she works on a solar array gear during a Nov.18, 2008 spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 20, 2008, 05:48 AM
Nations Around the World Mark 10th Anniversary of International Space Station (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/main/10th_anniversary.html)

International Space Station Assembly - Past Flights (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/station/structure/iss_assembly.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/126318main_iss_assembly_1ar.jpg)

The Zarya Control Module was launched atop a Russian Proton rocket from Baikonur Cosmodrome, Kazakhstan, on Nov. 20, 1998. Zarya provides battery power, fuel storage and rendezvous and docking capability for Soyuz and Progress space vehicles. Credit NASA.

(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0803/iss_sts122.jpg)

The developing International Space Station (ISS) has changed its appearance again. March 5th, 2008; the Space Shuttle orbiter Atlantis visited the ISS and added components that included the Columbus Science Laboratory. The entire array of expansive solar panels is visible in this picture taken by the Atlantis Crew after leaving the ISS to return to Earth. The world's foremost space outpost can be seen developing over the past several years by comparing the above image to past images. Also visible above are many different types of modules, a robotic arm, another impressive set of solar panels, and a supply ship. Construction began on the ISS in 1998. Credit NASA.

She's come along way & still far to go.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: jedipurge on November 20, 2008, 12:25 PM
Astronaut loses tool bag during spacewalk (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/18/endeavour.spacewalk/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081118-sts126-eva1tank-02.jpg)

STS-126 spacewalker Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper hauls an empty nitrogen tank the size of an office desk from the ISS to the shuttle Endeavour with the blue Earth and solar arrays in the background on Nov. 18, 2008. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081118-sts126-eva1-toolbag-02.jpg)

An equipment bag drifts away from spacewalker Heide Stefanyshyn-Piper as she works on a solar array gear during a Nov.18, 2008 spacewalk outside the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV.


Typical woman-lost her purse.  :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 21, 2008, 01:46 PM
Quite the light show here last night, seems a very bright meteor passed over the city & the provences of Saskatchewan & Manitoba around 5:30pm. Dang, I was crashed out during that time.  :-\

Mysterious fireball may have never touched down (http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20081120/alta_fireball_081121/20081121?hub=Canada)

(http://images.ctv.ca/archives/CTVNews/img2/20081121/450_fireball_081121.jpg)

A fireball shoots across downtown Edmonton is this image taken from video sent to CTV Edmonton by Andrew Bartlet, late Thursday, Nov. 20, 2008.

(http://images.ctv.ca/archives/CTVNews/img2/20081121/450_sask_map_081121.jpg)

A CTV map details the area of western Canada where the flash was reportedly visible.

The meteor was caught on tape, clicky links below. The best youtube footage thus far is the "Police dash cam of Meteor over Edmonton, Canada". ******* awesome.  :o  8)

Meteor Edmonton Canada (http://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=meteor+edmonton&search_type=&aq=-1&oq=)

Global TV news report, meteor caught on tape twice!  (http://www.globaltv.com/globaltv/edmonton/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on November 21, 2008, 03:28 PM
It could have been the government shooting down a UFO with the SDI.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 22, 2008, 05:27 PM
It could have been the government shooting down a UFO with the SDI.

Close but what about this that happened shortly before this meteor came down...

Japanese ship fails to hit missile target off Kauai (http://www.starbulletin.com/news/hawaiinews/20081120_japanese_ship_fails_to_hit_missile_target_off_kauai.html)

Some say a meteor, others the missle or the escape pod from ANH  ::) & others the tool bag that the female astronaut lost.  :D

Whatever is was, the hunt is on.

Hunt on for meteorite (http://www.edmontonsun.com/News/Edmonton/2008/11/22/7498051-sun.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 28, 2008, 07:45 PM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081127-sts126-turkey-02.jpg)

A look at the Thanksgiving dinner of smoked turkey, stuffing, green beans and mushrooms and other treats for the STS-126 crew of shuttle Endeavour on Nov. 27, 2008. Credit: collectSPACE.com.

Shuttle departs space station for Earth (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/28/shuttle.mission.ap/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081128-sts126-undockiss-02.jpg)

The International Space Station as seen by cameras aboard NASA's shuttle Endeavour after its Nov. 28, 2008 undocking during the STS-126 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081128-sts126-undock-02.jpg)

Backdropped against white clouds, space shuttle Endeavour is seen from the International Space Station shortly after undocking on Nov. 28, 2008 during the STS-126 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

Endeavour is scheduled to land at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., Sunday at 1:19 p.m.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 28, 2008, 09:57 PM
Awesome news on the meteor from last week.

Meteorite pieces found in Saskatchewan (http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2008/11/28/meteorite.html)

Scientists find space rock that streaked through skies of Western Canada (http://www.google.com/hostednews/canadianpress/article/ALeqM5hQH38ffdtrLzFjJ0gmd_MlIBUJaA)

(http://a123.g.akamai.net/f/123/12465/1d/media.canada.com/8b155442-1233-4729-a252-c06490ca0f9f/meteorite.jpg)

The remains of a meteor that exploded in the sky near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border on Nov. 20 have been located by University of Calgary researchers south of the city of Lloydminster in an area called Buzzard Coulee.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Rob on November 28, 2008, 10:37 PM
Excellent!

A few years ago I ended up with a chunk of the Campo Del Cielo meteorite.  It has a little oxidation going on that I need to deal with one of these days - I love the idea of having a space rock sitting on my desk.

(http://img.photobucket.com/albums/v104/nextseason/Photography/campodelcielo.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on November 29, 2008, 12:15 AM
Cool info on the meteor Dale.  That whole story reminded me of the meteorite in 1990 that could be seen up the entire east coast of the US.  It crashed into a car in Peekskill, NY not too far from where my grandparents lived.

I always wondered if insurance covered that.  :D


Neat paper weight there Rob.  How much did that set you back?

Have any of you heard about Bigelow Aerospace (http://www.bigelowaerospace.com/)?  They are a private company that actually has two technology demonstrator space stations in orbit!  I read about them in Air & Space Smithsonian and I think it's incredibly cool.

As much as I'm a fan of NASA, I also like to see commercial companies venture into space.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Rob on November 29, 2008, 01:52 AM
Thanks. :)

It was a Christmas gift - but I'd guess somewhere in the neighborhood of $100 to $150 based on my own eBay searches.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on November 29, 2008, 08:58 AM
The remains of a meteor that exploded in the sky near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border on Nov. 20 have been located by University of Calgary researchers south of the city of Lloydminster in an area called Buzzard Coulee.

Buzzard Coulee - gotta be one of the coolest place names I've seen.  Lloydminster isn't too bad either.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 29, 2008, 10:28 AM
Buzzard Coulee sure has a ring to it, I'm sure that will be the meteors name.

More pics on the net on the meteor.

(http://images.ctv.ca/archives/CTVNews/img2/20081128/450_meteorite_3.jpg)

Planetary scientist Alan Hildebrand and graduate student Ellen Milley said they found meteorite fragments in a rural area near the border town of Lloydminster, Alta., late Thursday. (Photo courtesy of Grady Semmens, University of Calgary)

(http://images.ctv.ca/archives/CTVNews/img2/20081128/450_meteorite_2.jpg)

A meteorite fragment is shown next to a hammer for scale. (Photo courtesy of Grady Semmens, University of Calgary)

(http://images.ctv.ca/archives/CTVNews/img2/20081128/450_meteorite_1.jpg)

Graduate student Ellen Milley lays next to a meteorite fragment in a rural area near the border town of Lloydminster, Alta. (Photo courtesy of Grady Semmens, University of Calgary)

(http://images.ctv.ca/archives/CTVNews/img2/20081128/450_meteorite_5.jpg)

Planetary scientist Alan Hildebrand and hold a chunk of meteorite fragment in a rural area near the border town of Lloydminster, Alta. (Photo courtesy of Grady Semmens, University of Calgary)

There was another meteor find back in the 60's, known as the Bruderheim meteorite (http://www2.ville.montreal.qc.ca/planetarium/Information/Expo_Meteorites/Vedettes/bruderheim_a.html), quite the find as this one had more than 700 fragments that were recovered. 303 kg of stones, ranging in size from 31 kg to 5 mg.

Rob, any idea on the size/weight of that Campo Del Cielo meteorite? I remember you were looking for a meteorite (http://www.jedidefender.com/yabbse/index.php?topic=13246.0) a few years back. I meteor hype has me interested in getting a piece to display.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 30, 2008, 09:12 AM
The STS-126 crew members, Commander Chris Ferguson, Pilot Eric Boe and mission specialists Don Pettit, Steve Bowen, Heidemarie Stefanyshyn-Piper, Shane Kimbrough and Greg Chamitoff, were awakened at 4:55 a.m. EST for what is scheduled to be their flight’s landing day. This morning's wake up music was "Gonna Fly Now," played for Ferguson.

The two landing opportunities at Kennedy Space Center, Fla., are for 1:19 p.m. and 2:54 p.m. Forecasts say rain, perhaps thunderstorms and crosswinds could prevent a landing there.

Two additional landing opportunities are available today at Edwards Air Force Base, Calif., at 4:25 p.m. and 6 p.m.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 30, 2008, 11:58 AM
NASA waves off first chance for shuttle landing (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/30/space.shuttle/)

The weather forecast is "no go" for today's second landing opportunity at Kennedy Space Center. A front is moving through Florida, causing storms to move through the region. Flight controllers are also looking at potential landing opportunities for Monday. The STS-126 crew still has two landing opportunities today at Edwards Air Force Base in California at 4:25 p.m. and 6 p.m. if the weather conditions are not favorable for a Monday landing in Florida.

Entry Flight Director Bryan Lunney gave a "go" for payload bay door closure. This does not necessarily mean that Endeavour will land today. Weather conditions for landing at Kennedy Space Center tomorrow are still being evaluated. A front is moving through Florida, causing storms to move through the region. The STS-126 crew still has two landing opportunities today at Edwards Air Force Base in California at 4:25 p.m. and 6 p.m. if the weather conditions are not favorable for a Monday landing in Florida.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 30, 2008, 12:51 PM
NASA: Shuttle to try landing at air base in California (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/30/space.shuttle/index.html)

Flight controllers have elected to press ahead with space shuttle Endeavour's landing at Edwards Air Force Base in California at 4:25 p.m. EST today. The deorbit burn is scheduled for 3:19 p.m. The weather forecast in Florida for today and tomorrow is unfavorable for a shuttle landing at Kennedy Space Center.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 30, 2008, 09:38 PM
Shuttle Endeavour lands at California air base (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/11/30/space.shuttle/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/294657main_image_1232_946-710.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour touches down at Edwards Air Force Base on Nov. 30, 2008, concluding the STS-126 mission. This image captures Endeavour's drag chute as it deployed as the shuttle touched down the base's Runway 4. Credit: NASA/Tony Landis.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on December 1, 2008, 09:40 AM
My kids freaked out a little with the sonic boom. When they learned it was the space shuttle, they loved it.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 10, 2008, 03:40 AM
Holy ****, this vehicle is sweet!  8)

Secretive Space Vehicle Tested at Private Texas Site (http://news.yahoo.com/s/space/secretivespacevehicletestedatprivatetexassite)

Video - Blue Origin's Goddard Vehicle Test Launch (http://www.space.com/common/media/video.php?videoRef=BlueGoddard1)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070103_blue_origin_02.jpg)

Blue Origin's Goddard test vehicle stands poised for launch on its West Texas launch pad on Nov. 13, 2006. Credit: Blue Origin.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/070103_blueorigin_lnch_02.jpg)

Origin's Goddard demonstration vehicle in mid-flight above its West Texas launch pad during a test launch on Nov. 13, 2006. Credit: Blue Origin.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 13, 2008, 11:31 AM
Moon muscles in on meteor shower
Usually dazzling Geminid display dimmed by lunar light this year (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/28195200/)

Too bad the moon is full, this would be a good meteor show. Even if there was no full moon & with the temps here being around -30°C, I'm not freezing my nuts off!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on December 13, 2008, 04:46 PM
-30 isn't THAT bad.....I preferred that temperature to between 0-10 Farenheit when I was living up in Alaska!   :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 13, 2008, 04:55 PM
Yeah, Alaska is warmer than us right now.  ::)

Come up here & I'll see how you like -30°C.  ;)

With that breeze & the temp, it sure as hell ain't gonna happen.  :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 18, 2008, 10:18 PM
NASA looks for places to display retired space shuttles (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/12/18/shuttles.for.display/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/081218-shuttle-enterprise-02.jpg)

Move over Enterprise: the orbiter on display at the Smithsonian's Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia may be replaced by another space shuttle. Credit: collectSPACE.com
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on December 19, 2008, 12:45 AM
Imagine having one of THOSE in your collection... :o
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 19, 2008, 03:29 AM
You would think they would be cheaper, look at the mileage they have!   :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: jedi_master_sal on December 19, 2008, 10:46 AM
Meh, their not MIB.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on December 19, 2008, 11:23 AM
I guess they are in "played with" condition.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: jedi_master_sal on December 19, 2008, 01:02 PM
I guess they are in "played with" condition.
And if you read the report, they are loose and MISSING some accessories...and I bet there's no market for repros of those.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on December 19, 2008, 01:26 PM
I guess they are in "played with" condition.
And if you read the report, they are loose and MISSING some accessories...and I bet there's no market for repros of those.
It was a small production run though, so I doubt the market will be flooded.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on December 19, 2008, 02:32 PM
Do you think Protecto Pak would make a case for it?

Meh...some ******* would probably get it AFA'd.   ::)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 19, 2008, 11:06 PM
I would rather have a Buran (http://www.technik-museum.de/pdf_deu...r/sp_buran.pdf).  ;)

Russian Space Shuttle Sails up the Rhine for German Home (http://www.space.com/news/080409-buran-germany.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 22, 2008, 11:56 PM
40 years ago... Apollo 8 Christmas (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bnyNXLXl8iA)

Apollo 8 astronauts remember historic voyage (http://www.cnn.com/2008/TECH/space/12/22/apollo8.anniversary/index.html#cnnSTCPhoto)

(http://news.cnet.com/i/ne/p/2007/1114apollo8earth550x440.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 30, 2008, 02:55 PM
NASA reports graphic details of Columbia deaths (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20081230/ap_on_re_us/columbia_astronauts)

Columbia Crew Survival Investigation Report (16.2 MB PDF) (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/298870main_SP-2008-565.pdf)

NASA Fact Sheet: Space Shuttle and Constellation Program Actions Resulting From SCSIIT Recommendations (36 Kb PDF) (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/298786main_Fact-sheet_SSP_and_Constellation_action_result_fromSCSIIT.pdf)

Columbia Accident Investigation Board (http://www.nasa.gov/columbia/caib/html/start.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 3, 2009, 11:24 AM
5 years ago today & they still keep going.  8)

NASA's rovers mark five years on Red Planet (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/01/03/mars.rovers.five.years/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090103-rovers-5year-02.jpg)

This mosaic of frames from the navigation camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity gives a view to the northeast from the rover's position on its 1,687th Martian day, or sol (Oct. 22, 2008). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090103-rovers-5year-pth-02.jpg)

The red-and-white line on this image traces the route that NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drove from its landing inside Eagle Crater on Jan. 4, 2004 (Universal Time; Jan. 3 Pacific Standard Time) through the 1,742nd Martian day, or sol, of the mission (Dec. 17, 2008). During that period, Opportunity drove 13.62 kilometers (8.5 miles). Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Cornell/OSU/ASU.

(http://marsrovers.jpl.nasa.gov/gallery/artwork/images/rover1_400.jpg)

I still like the dust devils they captured on film.  8)

(http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/images/mer/2005-07-08/496a-Anim.gif)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on January 4, 2009, 10:42 AM
It's nice to know that we can build things that live way beyond their life expectancy. I'm excited for the team that built them.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on January 4, 2009, 08:50 PM
National Geographic Channel had a special about these two rovers.  It was really well done.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on January 4, 2009, 10:57 PM
The meteorite discussion actually jogged my memory about one that I saw in the summer of 1994.  I actually was able to dig up THIS CBC REPORT (http://archives.cbc.ca/on_this_day/06/14/) about it.  It was an amazing fireball to see as it streaked across the skies of northern NY and southern Quebec.  It was so impressive that it makes me wish that I had a video camera with me that day.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 5, 2009, 04:49 AM
That's a nice chunk of rock to find, 2.3 kilograms.  8)

The remains of a meteor that exploded in the sky near the Alberta/Saskatchewan border on Nov. 20 have been located by University of Calgary researchers south of the city of Lloydminster in an area called Buzzard Coulee.

Buzzard Coulee - gotta be one of the coolest place names I've seen.  Lloydminster isn't too bad either.

Buzzard Coulee sure has a ring to it, I'm sure that will be the meteors name.

Well wadda ya know.  8)

10,000 meteorites touched down in Sask.: scientist (http://www.ctv.ca/servlet/ArticleNews/story/CTVNews/20081222/meteorites_earth_081222/20081222?hub=CTVNewsAt11)

Quote
The asteroid is being called the "Buzzard Coulee fireball," named after the area where Milley found the first fragments.

Hopefully I will get a small chunk of this meteorite, will see.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on January 7, 2009, 07:07 PM
That's a nice chunk of rock to find, 2.3 kilograms.  8)


It was an amazing fireball.  My friends and I equated it to seeing a flaming bus streaking through the sky.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 15, 2009, 03:59 AM
Looking forward the the NASA release.

Mars methane discovery hints at presence of life  (http://www.telegraph.co.uk/scienceandtechnology/science/sciencenews/4243321/Mars-methane-discovery-hints-at-presence-of-life.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on January 15, 2009, 09:24 AM
Hadn't seen that one yet. Very cool.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 15, 2009, 09:16 PM
Methane discovery could mean life on Mars (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/01/15/mars.methane/index.html)

Martian Methane Reveals the Red Planet is not a Dead Planet (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/mars/news/marsmethane.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on January 15, 2009, 09:44 PM
Thanks Dale. Those are some pretty interesting articles. 2011 still seems along way off.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on January 16, 2009, 05:24 PM
Mars has gas?  How embarrassing!

;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 17, 2009, 12:58 AM
Just heartbreaking looking at the pics.  :'(

“Where did all the three Russian shuttles go?”.  (http://englishrussia.com/?p=2006#more-2006)

Buran: End of an adventure (http://www.buran-energia.com/bourane-buran/bourane-fin.php)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on January 17, 2009, 09:13 AM
I can't believe the thing wasn't stripped.  Materials alone must be worth a fortune.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on January 17, 2009, 02:31 PM
Actually, it looks like it was stripped down already.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on January 19, 2009, 01:13 PM
Those are really sad pictures. You think they would have at least auctioned it off on ebay.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 4, 2009, 02:58 AM
NASA delays launch of shuttle Discovery (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/02/04/shuttle.discovery.delay/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090114-sts119-atpad-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery arrives at Launch Pad 39A on Jan. 14, 2008 for a planned Feb. 12 liftoff on STS-119. Credit: NASA.

Spirit Resumes Driving (http://marsrovers.nasa.gov/newsroom/pressreleases/20090202a.html)

(http://astronomyonline.org/SolarSystem/Images/Mars/SpiritOpportunity.jpg)  (http://www.astronomy.ie/mimage/walle.jpg)   :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 12, 2009, 08:34 AM
Russian, U.S. satellites collide in space (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/02/12/us.russia.satellite.crash/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on February 12, 2009, 09:25 AM
It was bound to happen.  :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BrentS on February 20, 2009, 11:59 AM
See 5 Planets this Month (http://www.space.com/spacewatch/090213-ns-five-planet.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on February 20, 2009, 07:05 PM
Huge gamma-ray blast spotted 12.2 bln light-years from earth (http://news.yahoo.com/s/afp/20090219/sc_afp/sciencespaceastronomy)

Quote
The spectacular blast, which occurred in September in the Carina constellation, produced energies ranging from 3,000 to more than five billion times that of visible light, astrophysicists said.

 :o

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Daigo-Bah on February 20, 2009, 09:46 PM
Last night I attended a lecture from Fred Haise, the Apollo 13 astronaut!  He showed actual footage from the mission as well as his aircraft crash and the early space shuttle test flights.  The talk was at the University of Southern Mississippi where I teach part time.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 2, 2009, 09:23 AM
China's lunar probe lands on moon (http://www.cnn.com/2009/WORLD/asiapcf/03/02/china.moon/index.html)

Chinese probe crashes into moon  (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/asia-pacific/7917957.stm)

New space launch center to be built in China's southernmost Hainan  (http://news.xinhuanet.com/english/2009-03/02/content_10930151.htm)

China plans first space docking for 2011 (http://www.google.com/hostednews/afp/article/ALeqM5iybcZW-FJGDR9LlLNi2RC3vR7uxQ)

Obama Plans To Retire Space Shuttle  (http://www.informationweek.com/news/showArticle.jhtml?articleID=215500028&subSection=News)

National Aeronautics and Space Administration (2 pages, 88 KB) PDF File (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/asset.aspx?AssetId=746)

NASA's Space Shuttle Program managers meet March 4, to review new testing data of space shuttle Discovery's gaseous hydrogen flow control valves.

Managers then will be able to decide whether to go ahead with another Flight Readiness Review on March 6. The launch date for STS-119's mission to the International Space Station is tentatively targeted for March 12.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 4, 2009, 05:17 AM
Tiny moon discovered orbiting Saturn (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/03/04/saturn.moon/index.html)

(http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2009/03/images/090303-new-moon-saturn_big.jpg)

Image courtesy NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 11, 2009, 10:28 AM
Delayed Discovery is ready for launch (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/03/11/shuttle.launch.preview/index.html)

Clicky pic for high rez image.  8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/317861main_image_1301_946-710.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/317864main_full-moon_full.JPG)

A nearly full Moon sets as the space shuttle Discovery sits atop Launch pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida, in the early morning hours of Wednesday, March 11, 2009. Image Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls.

Discovery and her seven crewmembers are scheduled to blast off from a seaside launch pad at NASA's Kennedy Space Center here at 9:20:10 p.m. EDT (0120:10 March 12 GMT) to begin their two-week construction flight.

Other space news:

Phoenix Mars Lander Found Liquid Water, Some Scientists Think (http://www.livescience.com/space/090310-phoenix-water.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090310-phoenix-globs-02.jpg)

Images of one of Phoenix's struts taken by the lander's robotic arm camera on Sols (or Martian days) 8, 31 and 44 of th emission. The two spheroids enclosed by the circle appear to merge with each other, which some Phoenix scientists argue is a sign that the globs are liquid water. Credit: Renno, et al., NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 12, 2009, 11:01 AM
Space shuttle Discovery launch canceled (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/03/11/shuttle.launch.scrubbed/index.html)

From Space.com

Quote
CAPE CANAVERAL, FLA. – The launch of NASA's space shuttle Discovery will fly no earlier than March 15 after a gas leak thwarted an attempted liftoff on Wednesday, mission managers said today.

NASA postponed  Discovery's spaceflight earlier today after detecting a leak in a hydrogen gas vent line as the shuttle began fueling up for a planned launch tonight at 9:20 p.m. EDT (0120 GMT March 12).

Mike Moses, head of Discovery's mission management team, said engineers will begin inspecting the faulty gas line on Thursday and shuttle officials will meet that afternoon to review launch plans.

Moses said that delaying until March 15 will mean having to cut one spacewalk and three days from Discovery's flight, which was planned to last 14 days and include four spacewalks.

If the mission is delayed even more, to March 16, Discovery astronauts would complete only two of four spacewalks and the mission will run only 10 days, Moses said during a briefing here at NASA's Kennedy Space Center after the launch attempt.

The changes are necessary to make room for a Russian Soyuz spacecraft that is already scheduled to launch toward the International Space Station on March 26. If Discovery doesn't launch by March 17, NASA would have to stand down until after the Soyuz launch and a space station crew change. The next launch window would open on April 7.

"This is life in the space business. Sometimes things happen," said Moses. If Discovery's flight shifts to April, it would likely cause a ripple of delays for NASA's other shuttle launches this year and the planned shift to a larger, six-person crew aboard the space station this May, he added.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090311-sts119-gasleak-02.jpg)

The hydrogen vent line connects to the external tank for space shuttle Discovery. A leak in the line prevented a planned March 11, 2009 launch attempt. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jayson on March 12, 2009, 02:03 PM
Astronauts Evacuate Space Station Because of Flying Space Debris (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,509010,00.html)

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 14, 2009, 09:14 PM
Space shuttle Discovery on pace for Sunday launch (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/03/14/shuttle.launch/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090314-sts119-lights-02.jpg)

Lights around Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida bathe space shuttle Discovery at the seaside pad of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida after rollback of the rotating service structure for a March 11, 2009 launch attempt. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 15, 2009, 10:33 PM
Space shuttle Discovery launches after repairs  (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/03/15/shuttle.launch/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090315-sts119-liftoff-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery blazes into the night sky as it lifts off Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center on March 15, 2009 to begin the STS-119 mission to the ISS. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Hemish on March 16, 2009, 08:06 AM
Shuttle launches dont make much news these days down here, but dam me if it isnt an impressive thing to watch.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 16, 2009, 10:59 AM
More impressive for the lucky ones that get to see it. I heard it's one hell of a thing to watch live, the roar of the ignition, crackling of the engines as it gets higher etc...  8)

Check out these vidoes of some Shuttle launches from the air, amazing stuff!

STS-117 launch shot from aircraft at 11,000 ft ovr Orlando (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-ZP0wiqIzZY&feature=related)

Space Shuttle Atlantis Launch 2006 from plane (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2-4Ztz5x6fw&feature=related)

Shuttle Launch from plane 3/15/2009 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rf283YDedD0)

STS-126 Shuttle Launch 11-14-08 night (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cC8eHhLIDqs)

NASA Shuttle Launch Endeavour STS-126 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SHEWm68yXg0&feature=related)

Real Sound of Space Shuttle STS-117 Launch, 3 miles (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xsRuJ37kyZg)

BEST SOUND OF A SHUTTLE LAUNCH! STS-117 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LvbK93FB5kU&feature=related)

A view from inside a Shuttle during launch:

Shuttle launch from inside orbitor (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iwfsFtpACFw&feature=related)

Last nights launch:

Space Shuttle Discovery STS-119 Launch 15.03.2009 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WiSW9QEKaGE)

Too ******* cool, it's sad that it will come to an end.  :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on March 16, 2009, 12:08 PM
My Mom went out into their backyard to watch last evening.  They can attest it truly awe-inspiring to watch the launch.

In relation to all the delays with this particular launch.  Am I the only one noticing that recent launches have had more and more delays related to concerns about particular parts?  I'm concerned we might have a coming disaster on our hands, and here's why I think so.

The subcontractors that NASA use realize the shuttle program has a limited life.  They don't want to invest in producing costly spare components that will likely never be used by NASA, and they probably won't get paid extra for producing.  So when there is a spare needed, they are scrounging around for replacements.  I'm not saying they are putting parts on that aren't the right part or anything, its just noticable that they have problem with particular parts over and over.  To me this signals an inordinate amount of risk given the extremely low margin of safety involved essentially strapping people to a controlled explosion.

Like I said, I hope no astronauts are at risk, I just think at this particular point, for this particular highly dangerous program, that's its become something of a liability to use private subcontractors.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on March 16, 2009, 04:44 PM
The night launches are the coolest.  I saw a couple while I was a student at UCF.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 17, 2009, 09:58 AM
Not sure if anyone has seen this show, I have been watching Journey to the Edge of the Universe (http://www.discoverychannel.ca/Article.aspx?aid=14227) on our Canadian Discovery Channel.

Quote
- This one-of-a-kind television event creates the first accurate non-stop journey from Earth to the edge of the universe -

In one uncut, single camera shot, experience the universe like never before! Accelerate up and out of our atmosphere, past the moon and out of our solar system, to the nearest stars, nebulae, galaxies and beyond - right to the edge of the universe. On this awe-inspiring and unique voyage, encounter the most beautiful, powerful and mysterious phenomena in the cosmos; from pulsars to supermassive black holes, from star nurseries to quasars.

Based on real images from the world's most advanced telescopes, spacecraft and rovers, cutting edge visual effects and CGI combine to create this is the first, accurate non-stop journey from here to infinity. Packed with wonder, excitement and even moments of terror, this 'cosmic zoom' reveals fascinating information that will underline our human connection with these spectacular and far-off phenomena.

It aired at the begining of the month & I missed it but low & behold it's onlne.

Truly an amazing show to watch. The Pinwheel galaxy is 27 million light years away, a galaxy that contains about one trillion plus stars. To even have a image like below from something that is so far away is just unbelievable. Clicky for high rez.

(http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/medium/heic0602a.jpg) (http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/screen/heic0602a.jpg)

Quote
The cosmos is all that is or ever was or ever will be. Somewhere, something incredible is waiting to be known. Carl Sagan (1934 - 1996)

As for the Shuttle Discovery:

Quote
Space junk may force NASA and the International Space Station team to move the ISS, creating a slight detour for the space shuttle Discovery. The debris is likely to pass near the ISS on March 17, just one day before Discovery is scheduled to dock with the ISS. Busted up spacecraft pieces continue to grow.

According to NASA, a breakaway piece of a Russian satellite is likely to come close to the ISS on March 17, just one day before the Discovery is scheduled to dock at the orbiting platform. If the debris comes close enough to the ISS, NASA engineers will slightly move the ISS and force Discovery to recalculate its own path to the ISS.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/319148main_119-rms.jpg)

A video camera aboard space shuttle Discovery captured this view of the shuttle's payload bay and robotic arm as the vehicle soared above the Earth. Photo credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on March 17, 2009, 10:40 AM

(http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/medium/heic0602a.jpg) (http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/screen/heic0602a.jpg)


Do we know which telescope took that picture?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 17, 2009, 10:47 AM

(http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/medium/heic0602a.jpg) (http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/screen/heic0602a.jpg)


Do we know which telescope took that picture?

Hubble (http://hubblesite.org/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on March 17, 2009, 02:48 PM

(http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/medium/heic0602a.jpg) (http://www.spacetelescope.org/images/screen/heic0602a.jpg)


Do we know which telescope took that picture?

Hubble (http://hubblesite.org/)

Its because of pictures like that I still pick up occasional copies of Astronomy or Sky & Telescope.  In college I took an astronomy class and my parents got me a small  Meade Go-To scope.  I haven't gotten it out in over a year, so I'm not getting magazine for the articles.  Instead I just like to see the amazing photos that essentially amatuers can take.  Plus there are the amazing shots like that from Hubble or one of the instituational telescopes.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 18, 2009, 02:37 AM
Discovery docks at international space station  (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/03/17/shuttle.discovery.docking/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090317-sts119-dkshuttle-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery is seen in this camera view just before docking at the International Space Station on March 17, 2009 during the STS-119 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/*******-02.jpg)

A camera outside the International Space Station reveals the shuttle Discovery just after its March 17, 2009 docking during the STS-119 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth Kenobi on March 18, 2009, 10:57 AM
Bat hitches ride on space shuttle (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/03/18/bat.shuttle/index.html)

(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/TECH/space/03/18/bat.shuttle/art.bat.shuttle.nasa.jpg)

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on March 18, 2009, 11:17 AM
Bat hitches ride on space shuttle (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/03/18/bat.shuttle/index.html)

(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/TECH/space/03/18/bat.shuttle/art.bat.shuttle.nasa.jpg)



I like how at the end of the article the author states its unclear if the bat is stil clinging to the shuttle.  Uhm, it was clinging to the external fuel tank, that big orange thing..., it gets dropped shortly after take off.  So no, the bat is clearly not still clinging to the shuttle.  Interesting that with the issues they've had with the insulation on the tank that they didn't do more to ensure the tank wasn't damaged.  Though perhaps it was on the non-shuttle side, so the orbiter wasn't in danger of falling debris.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on March 18, 2009, 11:32 AM
I think it was more of a joke.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 18, 2009, 11:51 AM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090317-bat-tank-02.jpg)

The bat can be seen on the north side of Discovery's external tank during launch. Credit: collectSPACE.com

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090317-bat-tank2-02.jpg)

The bat clung on to the external tank for dear life during Discovery's liftoff. Credit: SPACE.com

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090317-bat-yellow-02.jpg)

The bat clung on to the external tank for dear life during Discovery's liftoff. Credit: SPACE.com

Quote
Bat Hung On For a Ride Into Space
By Clara Moskowitz, Staff Writer, posted: 17 March 2009.06:29 pm ET

A small bat that was spotted blasting off with the space shuttle Sunday and clinging to the back side of Discovery's external fuel tank apparently held on throughout the launch.

NASA hoped the bat would fly away before the spacecraft's Sunday evening liftoff, but photos from the launch now show the bat holding on for dear life throughout the fiery ride. 

"He did change the direction he was pointing from time to time throughout countdown but ultimately never flew away," states a NASA memo obtained by SPACE.com. "Infrared imagery shows he was alive and not frozen like many would think ... Liftoff imagery analysis confirmed that he held on until at least the vehicle cleared [the] tower before we lost sight of him."

Officials at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., where Discovery launched from a seaside pad, said the bat's outlook after launch appears grim.

"Based on images and video, a wildlife expert who provides support to the center said the small creature was a free tail bat that likely had a broken left wing and some problem with its right shoulder or wrist," NASA officials said Tuesday. "The animal likely perished quickly during Discovery's climb into orbit."

Because the Kennedy Space Center is also home to Florida's Merritt Island National Wildlife Refuge, NASA's launch pads are equipped with several countermeasures, including warning sirens, to ward off birds and other wildlife. NASA also relies on radar to make sure large flocks of birds won't be struck by the shuttle during liftoff.

But the bat on Discovery's tank did not budge, even after engine ignition.

The bat was perched between one quarter and one third of the way up on the north side of the fuel tank, which is the side that faces away from the orbiter. NASA estimated the surface temperature of the tank at that location was between 58 and 70 degrees Fahrenheit, even though the canister was filled with super-cold liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen.

In the hours before Discovery's liftoff, NASA's Final Inspection Team (called the "ICE team") investigated whether the creature would pose a risk to the shuttle if its body impacted the orbiter's sensitive heat shield tiling. Ultimately, NASA officials signed a waiver confirming that the bat was safe to fly with.

"The bat eventually became 'Interim Problem Report 119V-0080' after the ICE team finished their walkdown," the memo said. "Systems Engineering and Integration performed a debris analysis on him and ultimately a Launch Commit Criteria waiver to ICE-01 was written to accept the stowaway."

This isn't the first time a bat has attempted to travel into space. Another bat was seen clinging to the side of the external tank attached to the shuttle Endeavour on its  STS-72 flight in 1996. That one maybe have been a bit more cautious, though: It flew away to safety right before launch.

Coincidentally, an astronaut aboard that flight, Koichi Wakata of Japan, also flew on Discovery this week, making him the first spaceflyer to share two rides with bats. Discovery's STS-119 mission is headed to the International Space Station to drop off the final segment of the lab's backbone truss and set of solar array panels.

NASA officials said a bat also set down on the external tank for the shuttle Columbia during its STS-90 mission in 1998. That bat also flitted away to safety during liftoff, they added.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 20, 2009, 10:19 AM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090319-sts119-eva1-rad-02.jpg)

Spacewalkers Steven Swanson and Richard Arnold II look on as a radiator is deployed on the new S6 truss at the ISS during a March 19, 2009 spacewalk. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090319-sts119-eva1-end-02a.jpg)

Spacewalker Richard Arnold II appears small compared the nearly 16-ton S6 truss installed during his March 19, 2009 spacewalk with Steven Swanson during NASA's STS-119 space station mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090319-sts119-s6glam-02.jpg)

The S6 truss (lower left) rests at the end of Canadarm2, the International Space Station's robotic arm as astronauts deliver it during NASA's STS-119 mission in March 2009. Credit: NASA.

U.S. mogul's wife calls time on $60 million space hobby (http://www.reuters.com/article/domesticNews/idUSTRE5244VT20090305)

Quote
U.S. software mogul Charles Simonyi plans to make history this month by becoming the first tourist to travel to space twice, but after watching him spend $60 million his new wife has decided to clip his wings.

Quote
Space Adventures offered to go one step further and allow him to leave the space station for a six-hour space walk for an additional $10 million.

Simonyi politely declined.

"Its not something I would undertake at my age," he said. "It's also very expensive."

Expensive! Dude! A chance in a lifetime to do a space walk & it's expensive with the amount of $$$ ya spent on 2 flights plus what you have left! ******* numpty!  ::)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on March 24, 2009, 11:30 AM
Space Station Colbert (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29841715/)

Wonder if NASA will go through with it...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 27, 2009, 01:04 PM
Clicky pic for high rez.  :o  8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/322540main_image_1314_428-321.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/322546main_s119e008357_full.jpg)

Suspended in space and backdropped by the blackness of space and the jewel-like blue of Earth sits the International Space Station. This image of the station was taken as STS-119 performed a fly around after undocking. Image Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160328main_stationmain_032609.jpg)

The Soyuz TMA-14 launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan on Thursday, March 26, 2009 carrying Expedition 19 Commander Gennady I. Padalka, Flight Engineer Michael R. Barratt and Spaceflight Participant Charles Simonyi to the International Space Station. (Photo Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls)

Is American Billionaire the Last Space Tourist?

26 March 2009: Today's launch of a paying civilian into orbit may be the last one for some time.

The Russian rockets that have been carrying rich private citizens to space consistently since 2001, through deals brokered by the U.S. firm Space Adventures, may soon be booked up by professional astronauts.

NASA and its international partners are planning to boost the International Space Station (ISS) from hosting crews of three to crews of six spaceflyers sometime this summer. The space population boom could mean that professional station astronauts will need every spare seat on the Russian Soyuz spacecrafts, as well as on the up to eight remaining space shuttle flights, that launch to the orbiting lab.

"It makes it more difficult to obtain flight opportunities on the missions that are scheduled to rotate crews," Space Adventures president Eric Anderson recently told SPACE.com.

American billionaire Charles Simonyi lifted off toward the International Space Station (ISS) this morning on a Russian rocket, after paying the Russian Federal Space Agency $35 million through Space Adventures. The trip is Simonyi's second – he previously flew to the ISS in 2007 – but could be the firm's last for a couple years.

"I'm actually optimistic, but it's too early to tell," Anderson said. "Even with a [space station] crew of six people it's conceivable that there might be a couple of seats for commercial purposes for 2010 or 2011."

Shuttle Discovery returning home.

The STS-119 crew is scheduled to stow items in the crew cabin this morning and complete a check out Discovery’s flight control surfaces. These surfaces will guide the orbiter’s unpowered flight through the atmosphere to a landing.

Landing is scheduled for 1:39 p.m. Saturday at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida with a second opportunity one orbit later at 3:14 p.m.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 29, 2009, 03:13 AM
Shuttle Discovery home after rendezvous with space station (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/03/28/nasa.shuttle.landing/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 1, 2009, 10:25 AM
Space Station Colbert (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/29841715/)

Wonder if NASA will go through with it...

Colbert demands 'democracy in orbit' after winning poll (http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/TV/03/31/colbert.nasa/index.html)

Quote
"NASA, I urge you to heed Congressman Fattah's call for democracy in orbit," Colbert said. "Either name that node after me, or I, too, will reject democracy and seize power as space's evil tyrant overlord."

Quote
Several media outlets have reported that NASA is working on a compromise in which it would slap the droll Colbert's name on a piece of "mission essential" equipment in the new wing: the toilet.

Excuse me while I take a dump in the Colbert!  :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 3, 2009, 11:30 AM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090402-orion-display-02.jpg)

On display at the Kennedy Space Center Visitor Complex in Florida is the Orion crew exploration vehicle mockup (right) before beginning open water recovery tests in April 2009. Credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/324063main_jsc2009e061913_lo.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/324056main_jsc2009e061839_lo.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/324066main_jsc2009e062023_lo.jpg)

NASA and Department of Defense personnel familiarize themselves with a Navy-built, 18,000-pound Orion mock-up in a test pool at the Naval Surface Warfare Center's Carderock Division in West Bethesda, Md. Ocean testing will begin April 6 off the coast of NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The goal of the operation, dubbed the Post-landing Orion Recovery Test, or PORT, is to determine what kind of motions the astronaut crew can expect after landing, as well as conditions outside for the recovery team. The experience will help NASA design landing recovery operations including equipment, ship and crew necessities. Credit for Photos: Ryan Hanyok and the NSWC photographic team led by Peter Congedo.

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on April 14, 2009, 01:04 PM
Trippy (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/04/14/space.hand/index.html)

(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/TECH/space/04/14/space.hand/art.spacehand.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 14, 2009, 03:53 PM
(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2009/TECH/space/04/14/space.hand/art.spacehand.jpg)

Colbert's hand!  :D

Colbert eagerly awaits NASA decision (http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/TV/04/14/colbert.nasa/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 15, 2009, 01:52 PM
And the winner is... Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill (http://www.cnn.com/2009/SHOWBIZ/TV/04/15/colbert.nasa/index.html)

Space Marathoner Suni Williams Announces New Space Station Treadmill Name on the "Colbert Report" (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dQzORduN0Vo)

Still would have liked to have seen a toilet named after him!  :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: GrandMoffNick on April 19, 2009, 11:24 AM
Does anybody know what the effect weightlessness has on the ability of ants to sort tiny screws?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 19, 2009, 12:34 PM
Does anybody know what the effect weightlessness has on the ability of ants to sort tiny screws?

Ants tunneling 'like crazy' in shuttle (http://www.cnn.com/2003/TECH/science/01/25/coolsc.spaceants/)

Ants were in space aboard the STS-107 mission of the Columbia, sadly the Columbia & her crew were lost.  :'(

(http://www.mariannedyson.com/spacehabantsimage_01_0_012203_003001.jpg)

This is the best video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6Rc3Lm4D12I) from space on the ants.  :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 21, 2009, 03:49 AM
Former astronaut: Man not alone in universe (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/04/20/ufo.conference/index.html)

Knew it!  :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on April 21, 2009, 10:35 AM
(http://alpha.zimage.com/~ant/antfarm/read/Simpsons1F13/SimpsonsAntSlave.jpg)(http://alpha.zimage.com/~ant/antfarm/read/Simpsons1F13/SimpsonsHailAnts.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: GrandMoffNick on April 21, 2009, 05:46 PM
I'm glad someone recognized my question for what it was.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 11, 2009, 10:01 AM
Shuttle to blast off for final Hubble fix (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/05/11/shuttle.mission.hubble/index.html)

Liftoff of space shuttle Atlantis on the STS-125 mission remains on schedule for 2:01 p.m. EDT from Launch Pad 39A.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090509-sts125-hubblepad-02.jpg)

Lights covering the fixed service structure on Launch Pad 39A cast their glow over space shuttle Atlantis poised for May 2009 launch toward the Hubble Space Telescope on the STS-125 mission. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.

Clicky pic for high rez.   8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_atlantis-430.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/180842main_2009-3026.jpg)

Night falls on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida following rollback of the pad’s rotating service structure, or RSS, revealing space shuttle Atlantis. Credit: NASA/Dimitri Gerondidakis.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 12, 2009, 05:03 AM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090511-launch-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Atlantis lifts off May 11 carrying seven astronauts bound for the Hubble Space Telescope. Atlantis' STS-125 mission is the last planned manned visit to the orbiting observatory. Credit: Roger Guillemette for SPACE.com

Astronauts ready for rescue mission they hope never happens (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/05/11/space.shuttle.rescue/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 13, 2009, 02:51 AM
Space shuttle suffered 'minor' damage at launch (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/05/12/space.shuttle.damage/index.html)

From Space.com:

Shuttle's Heat Shield Dings Appear to be Minor, NASA Says

HOUSTON - Astronauts discovered a trail of small dings in the vital heat shield of their space shuttle Atlantis on Tuesday, but NASA said the damage appears only minor and is not expected to be a concern.

The dings were caused by launch debris that fell from the shuttle's external tank as Atlantis rocketed toward the Hubble Space Telescope on Monday afternoon. Astronauts spotted the damage while scanning Atlantis with an inspection pole tipped with cameras and laser sensors.

LeRoy Cain, NASA's deputy shuttle program manager, said that even though the damage to Atlantis appears minor, a crack team of image analysis experts is hard at work evaluating the pictures beamed to Earth by shuttle astronauts during an in-depth inspection today.

"This is not something that we're very concerned about but we want the team to do our normal assessment and evaluation of it," Cain told reporters here at NASA's Johnson Space Center. "And we'll do that overnight tonight."

NASA has Atlantis' sister ship, the shuttle Endeavour, ready to launch as soon as Monday in the unlikely event that Atlantis is damaged beyond repair and its crew needs to be rescued in space. But Cain said that so far, nothing found on Atlantis has given NASA any reason to even consider a rescue mission.

"The chances of that being necessary are exceeding low," Cain said.

Atlantis commander Scott Altman and his crew are flying an 11-day mission to overhaul the 19-year-old Hubble Space Telescope for the fifth and final time. They are due to arrive at the space telescope on Wednesday. Hubble closed its camera eye with a protective lid today to protect the delicate optics inside from debris during the service call.

Five consecutive spacewalks are planned to install two new cameras and repair two others that were never designed to be fixed in space among other upgrades.

Launch debris spotted

NASA believes the dings were scratched into the side of Atlantis about 106 seconds after the shuttle launched into space. A camera on the shuttle's attached external fuel tank caught a piece of debris at that time, and wing-mounted sensors also recorded a slight impact then, too.

An image released by NASA shows the dings as white pockmarks in the black tiles caused by a piece of debris that appears to have scraped across a 21-inch (53-cm) section of the heat shield. The debris made multiple hits on four of the heat-resistant tiles lining the forward right side of the shuttle just ahead of where its body and starboard wing meet.

"At this point, what we're interested in is, 'Is it critical damage and if so, what would we do about it?'" Cain said. "Today, the answer is that it certainly doesn't look like it will be an issue for us."

Mission Control radioed Atlantis late Tuesday to say the dings appear so mild that the astronauts will not have to take an extra look at them with the inspection pole later in the mission.

"Alright! You've got some happy [spacewalk] campers up here," Altman called back.

Mission Control did ask the Atlantis crew to keep trying to send images from a stubborn digital camera mounted to the spacecraft's belly. The camera may have spotted where the debris came from on Atlantis' external tank, but is having trouble relaying the images back to Earth.

The astronauts also plan to perform a standard second inspection of the shuttle before landing to be sure it hasn't been damaged by space junk. The region of space around Hubble's 350-mile (563-km) orbit is littered with space debris, adding a slightly increased risk to the shuttle mission.

NASA has been on vigilant watch for any shuttle damage from launch debris since 2003, when a piece of fuel tank foam struck the shuttle Columbia led to its destruction during re-entry. Seven astronauts were killed in the disaster.

Now, astronauts scan their shuttle heat shields at least twice every mission. Atlantis is carrying a standard suite of repair tools just in case they might be needed.

Launch pad also damaged

While the Atlantis crew works in space, NASA is examining unexpected damage on Earth to the shuttle's launch pad at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.

The blast from Atlantis' engines damaged some nitrogen and pressure lines, as well as a 25-square-foot section of flame retardant material lining the trench beneath the shuttle's Launch Pad 39A, NASA spokesperson Allard Beutel told SPACE.com from the Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The so-called flame trench is used to funnel rocket exhaust away from the spacecraft during liftoff.

Beutel said pad workers are expected to be able to repair the launch pad damage in time for the planned June 13 blast off of NASA's next shuttle mission.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090512-sts125-damage-02.jpg)

This image from NASA shows dings (white pockmarks) in black tiles on Atlantis caused by a piece of debris that scraped across a 21-inch (53-cm) section of the starboard side heat shield during STS-125 launch toward Hubble. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090512-sts125-debrishit-02.jpg)

This view from a camera on the external tank for shuttle Atlantis shows a piece of debris just before it appears to strike the orbiter's starboard side during its May 11, 2009 launch toward the Hubble Space Telescope. NASA believes the damage is minor. Credit: NASA.

NASA plans Martian rescue after Spirit left trapped (http://www.thetechherald.com/article.php/200920/3656/NASA-plans-Martian-rescue-after-Spirit-left-trapped)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 14, 2009, 11:27 AM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090513-sts125-hubblegrab-02.jpg)

The Hubble Space Telescope is seen from space shuttle Atlantis just before astronauts grabbed it on May 13, 2009 during the STS-125 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090513-sts125-hubblegrab4-02.jpg)

A camera on the shuttle Atlantis shows the Hubble Space Telescope after astronauts plucked it from space on May 13, 2009 during the STS-125 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090514-sts125-hubble-02.jpg)

Atlantis astronauts capture the Hubble Space Telescope on May 13, 2009 during NASA's fifth and final servicing flight. Credit: NASA TV.

Russia to charge NASA $51M US per flight to space station (http://www.cbc.ca/world/story/2009/05/13/russia-price-soyuz-rocket.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 16, 2009, 07:10 PM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090515-shuttle-sun2-02.jpg)

In this tightly cropped image the NASA space shuttle Atlantis and the Hubble Space Telescope are seen in silhouette, side by side during solar transit at 12:17p.m. EDT, Wednesday, May 13, 2009, from west of Vero Beach, Florida. The two spaceships were at an altitude of 600 km and they zipped across the sun in only 0.8 seconds. Photo Credit: NASA/Thierry Legault.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090515-shuttle-sun1-02.jpg)

In this tightly cropped image, the NASA space shuttle Atlantis is seen in silhouette during solar transit, Tuesday, May 12, 2009, from Florida. This image was made before Atlantis and the crew of STS-125 had grappled the Hubble Space Telescope. Photo Credit: NASA/Thierry Legault.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090516-sts125-eva3costar-02.jpg)

STS-125 spacewalker Andrew Feustel (on arm) hauls COSTAR - which served as glasses for the Hubble Space Telescope since 1993 - out of the observatory during a May 16, 2009 spacewalk. COSTAR is no longer needed and was replaced by a new instrument. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090516-sts125-eva3end-02.jpg)

Spacewalkers John Grunsfeld (bottom) and Andrew Feustel are seen after repairing Hubble's main camera and installing the Cosmic Origins Spectrograph during the third of five spacewalks on the Hubble Space Telescope during the STS-125 flight of shuttle Atlantis. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 18, 2009, 09:07 PM
That's a wrap.  8)

Astronauts complete last Hubble spacewalk  (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/05/18/space.shuttle/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090518-sts125-eva5fin-02.jpg)

Atlantis astronaut John Grunsfeld rides the shuttle arm with the Earth and Hubble in view in this image from a video still from an exterior camera during a May 18, 2009 spacewalk - the last ever at Hubble. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/345874main_s125e009606_small.jpg)

STS-125 Mission Specialist John Grunsfeld is attached to the shuttle's robotic arm during the fifth spacewalk to repair the Hubble Space Telescope. Photo Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 19, 2009, 12:13 PM
Upgraded Hubble flies solo again (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/05/19/space.shuttle/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090519-sts125-capture-02.jpg)

An STS-125 crewmember onboard the space shuttle Atlantis snapped a still photo of the Hubble Space Telescope as the two spacecraft approached each other in Earth orbit prior to the capture of the giant observatory on May 13, 2009. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 20, 2009, 01:37 AM
This is a cool video.  8)

Galactic Center of Milky Way Rises over Texas Star Party (http://vimeo.com/4505537?pg=embed&sec=)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: jedi_master_sal on May 20, 2009, 09:37 AM
This is a cool video.  8)

Galactic Center of Milky Way Rises over Texas Star Party (http://vimeo.com/4505537?pg=embed&sec=)

That was very cool.

There are so many awesome real life space things out there. The Milky Way, Nebulas (one of my favorite celestial things), planets, binary systems, etc.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 22, 2009, 03:18 AM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090521-sts125-hubble-02.jpg)

An STS-125 crew member aboard the Space Shuttle Atlantis captured this still image of the Hubble Space Telescope as the two spacecraft continue their relative separation on May 19, 2009. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/350415main_image_1367_800-600.jpg)

Backdropped by the blackness of space and the thin line of Earth's atmosphere, space shuttle Atlantis' payload bay, Canadian-built remote manipulator system robotic arm, vertical stabilizer and orbital maneuvering system pods are featured in this image photographed by the STS-125 crew on flight day 10. Credit: NASA.

As Atlantis’ crew prepares for landing Friday, mission managers are closely monitoring a low pressure system that has brought 16 inches of rain in three days to the Shuttle Landing Facility at Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Forecasters report the system is slowly moving away but it could still bring more rain, possible thunderstorms and winds that could violate the shuttle’s flight rules into the Florida spaceport area. The two Friday landing opportunities are at 10:00 and 11:39 a.m. EDT.

Should mission managers wave off landing the next four opportunities will be Saturday with two at Kennedy and two at Edwards Air Force Base in California. The shuttle has enough supplies to remain in space until Monday.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 22, 2009, 05:32 PM
NASA puts off shuttle landing until Saturday (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/05/22/space.shuttle.return/index.html)

The first opportunity to land the shuttle at Florida's Kennedy Space Center will be at 9:16 a.m. ET Saturday, NASA said on its Web site.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 23, 2009, 04:54 PM
NASA looks to Sunday shuttle landing (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/05/23/space.shuttle.return/index.html)

The next landing opportunity at Florida's Kennedy Space Center will be at 10:11 a.m. ET Sunday.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/350867main_image_1369_800-600.jpg)

The STS-125 crew aboard space shuttle Atlantis captured this still image of the Hubble Space Telescope as the two spacecraft begin their relative separation on May 19, 2009, after having been linked together for nearly a week. During the week, five spacewalks were performed to complete the final servicing mission to the telescope. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 24, 2009, 01:24 PM
California landing ends shuttle's Hubble trip (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/05/24/space.shuttle.return/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090524-sts125-land-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis lands at Edwards Air Force Base in California, completing the final servicing mission to the Hubble Space Telescope, on May 24, 2009. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 25, 2009, 12:56 PM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/351260main_image_1370_1024-768.jpg)

Atlantis and the crew of the STS-125 mission landed safely in California at Edwards Air Force Base after completing the Hubble Servicing Mission on Sunday, May 24, 2009. The almost 5.3-million-mile mission included five spacewalks to repair and upgrade the world-famous observatory. Credit: NASA/Carla Thomas.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 2, 2009, 12:08 PM
Holy crap! Check out this 1/10 scale model rocket of the Saturn V launch!  :o   8)

Steve Eves' Saturn V Launch (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bj4lj6YSwzg)

Steve Eve's Record Setting Saturn V Launch - April 25, 2009 - Steve Eve Saturn 5 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dHnk6ulSNSo&feature=related)

Steve Eve 1:10 scale Saturn V (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E4l2aFkZ_VM&feature=related)

(http://www.rocketryplanet.com/images/content/2538/1/1.jpg)

(http://tomsastroblog.com/images/saturnv042709.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 12, 2009, 10:29 AM
With Endeavour trip, NASA to unite 'lucky 13' (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/06/12/space.shuttle.endeavour/index.html)

Quote
When the seven crew members of space shuttle Endeavour meet up with the six astronauts on the international space station in a few days, the 13 visitors from Earth will comprise the largest space get-together.

Endeavour is set to blast off Saturday at 7:17 a.m. ET for a 16-day mission to help expand the space station. The rendezvous will be truly international: Among the 13 crew members of the station and shuttle are Canadian, European and Japanese astronauts, along with Russian cosmonauts

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090611-sts127-atpad-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour sits atop Pad 39A at NASA's seaside Kennedy Space Center launch complex for a planned 7:17 a.m. EDT (1117 GMT) liftoff on June 13, 2009 on the STS-127 mission to the ISS. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.

Japan’s moon probe makes crash landing (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/31214827/)

Kaguya Probe Shoots HD Moon Video (http://robots.net/article/2852.html)

Quote
The Japanese Kaguya probe, a robot craft currently orbiting the Moon, has some sensors not found on previous space-faring robots, HD video cameras. The amazing video returned is so clear it's easy to mistake for a computer simulation. Kaguya will be ending its Moon mission at 18:30 UTC on June 10 with an impact on the lunar surface.

******* unreal footage!  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on June 12, 2009, 02:34 PM
Amazing moon video. It's hard to tell what the scale is. Are we looking at a mile or hundreds of miles?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 13, 2009, 10:48 AM
Not sure but it looks like a few miles.

NASA scrubs Saturday launch of space shuttle Endeavour (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/06/13/space.shuttle.endeavour/index.html)

Boy Hit By Meteorite Travelling At 30,000mph (http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Boy-Hit-On-Arm-By-White-Hot-Meteorite-From-Outer-Space-Travelling-At-30000mph/Article/200906215302251?lpos=World_News_First_Strange_News__Article_Teaser_Region__0&lid=ARTICLE_15302251_Boy_Hit_On_Arm_By_White-Hot)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on June 13, 2009, 01:12 PM

Boy Hit By Meteorite Travelling At 30,000mph (http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Boy-Hit-On-Arm-By-White-Hot-Meteorite-From-Outer-Space-Travelling-At-30000mph/Article/200906215302251?lpos=World_News_First_Strange_News__Article_Teaser_Region__0&lid=ARTICLE_15302251_Boy_Hit_On_Arm_By_White-Hot)


At least he wasn't hit by a toliet seat cover like in "Dead like me".
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on June 15, 2009, 01:37 PM
Not sure but it looks like a few miles.

NASA scrubs Saturday launch of space shuttle Endeavour (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/06/13/space.shuttle.endeavour/index.html)

Boy Hit By Meteorite Travelling At 30,000mph (http://news.sky.com/skynews/Home/World-News/Boy-Hit-On-Arm-By-White-Hot-Meteorite-From-Outer-Space-Travelling-At-30000mph/Article/200906215302251?lpos=World_News_First_Strange_News__Article_Teaser_Region__0&lid=ARTICLE_15302251_Boy_Hit_On_Arm_By_White-Hot)


Endeavour is now scheduled to launch on Wednesday.  Time is TBD.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 15, 2009, 11:04 PM
Space shuttle launch now set for Wednesday (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/06/15/shuttle.launch.reschedule/index.html)

Quote
NASA has rescheduled the launch of space shuttle Endeavour for 5:40 a.m. ET Wednesday, pushing back the planned launch of a separate lunar mission.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 17, 2009, 04:08 AM
Space shuttle launch scrubbed again over gas leak (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/06/17/space.shuttle.launch/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 18, 2009, 11:50 AM
U.S. Shoots for the Moon, This Time to Stay (http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,1905344,00.html?cnn=yes)

Quote
Say this for the U.S. space program: we may have spent the last 40 years mostly ignoring the moon, but when we go back, we go back with a bang. Later today — if weather conditions and hardware permit — NASA will launch its much-anticipated and deeply imaginative Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO), the first American spacecraft of any kind to make a lunar trip since 1999. Not only will LRO help us study the moon in greater detail than ever before, it should also give us our first look at the six Apollo landing sites since we abandoned the historic campgrounds two generations ago.

Easily the most exciting piece of hardware aboard the ship, however — for lay lunarphiles at least — will be the camera. Even the best reconnaissance photography before the Apollo visits missed things, which is why Apollo 11's landing almost came to grief when Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin found themselves piloting their lander over an unexpected boulder field just seconds before touchdown. That's less likely to happen this time, thanks to a camera that can visualize objects as small as a few feet across. What's more, since the LRO will be in a polar orbit instead of an equatorial one — or, vertical rather than horizontal — the moon's 28-day rotation will eventually carry virtually every spot on the surface beneath the camera's lens.

"The moon will essentially walk around underneath the orbiter," says Garvin. "With the detail we get in the photographs, every picture will be like a mini-landing." That includes photos of the Apollo sites, all half dozen of which should have their portraits snapped. If NASA gets lucky, Garvin believes the first such images could be in hand by the 40th anniversary of Apollo 11, on July 20.

Well that should shut up the conspiracy theorists!  ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on June 18, 2009, 01:21 PM
Space shuttle launch scrubbed again over gas leak (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/06/17/space.shuttle.launch/index.html)

Launch has been rescheduled for July 11th.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 23, 2009, 09:33 AM
Two NASA space probes near moon (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/06/23/moon.missions/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on July 2, 2009, 09:38 AM
Moon conspiracy folks might have to face facts soon... (http://science.slashdot.org/story/09/07/01/2058202/Images-of-Apollo-Landing-Sites-Soon-Available?art_pos=13)

But I'll bet those images of the hardware are probably Photoshopped...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 2, 2009, 09:49 AM
It's pretty bad when they have to Photoshop you're hardware so they can see it!  :P   :-*

You can follow the location of the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter in the liny below.

LRO's Current Location (http://lroc.sese.asu.edu/whereislro/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 3, 2009, 11:16 AM
Check it out, the 1st pics from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter.   8)

NASA's Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter has transmitted its first images since reaching the moon on June 23. The spacecraft's two cameras, collectively known as the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter Camera, or LROC, were activated June 30. The cameras are working well and have returned images of a region in the lunar highlands south of Mare Nubium (Sea of Clouds).

As the moon rotates beneath LRO, LROC gradually will build up photographic maps of the lunar surface.

"Our first images were taken along the moon's terminator -- the dividing line between day and night -- making us initially unsure of how they would turn out," said LROC Principal Investigator Mark Robinson of Arizona State University in Tempe. "Because of the deep shadowing, subtle topography is exaggerated, suggesting a craggy and inhospitable surface. In reality, the area is similar to the region where the Apollo 16 astronauts safely explored in 1972. While these are magnificent in their own right, the main message is that LROC is nearly ready to begin its mission."

These images show cratered regions near the moon's Mare Nubium region, as photographed by the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter's LROC instrument. Impact craters feature prominently in both images. Older craters have softened edges, while younger craters appear crisp. Each image shows a region 1,400 meters (0.87 miles) wide, and features as small as 3 meters (9.8 feet) wide can be discerned. The bottoms of both images face lunar north.

The image below shows the location of these two images in relation to each other. The locator image shows an area 3,542 meters (2.2 miles) wide by 14,000 meters (8.7 miles) long. The scene is at the lunar coordinates 34.4 degrees South by 6.0 degrees West.

Credit: NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center/Arizona State University.

Clicky pics for larger image.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/365433main_nacl000000fd_top_detail_540x540.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/365431main_nacl000000fd_top_detail.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/365430main_nacl000000fd_middle_540x540.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/365426main_nacl000000fd_middle.jpg)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/365425main_nacl000000fd_boxes_small_152x600.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/365424main_nacl000000fd_boxes_small.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 11, 2009, 05:54 PM
NASA delays shuttle launch after nearby lightning (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/07/11/space.shuttle.endeavour/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090711-sts127-lightning-02.jpg)

A lightning strike at Launch Pad 39A during Friday afternoon's thunderstorm. Sensors counted 11 such strikes within 0.3 miles of the pad. Image credit: NASA TV.

Eight missions to go then the Shuttle is toast.   :'(

Final Countdown: A Guide to NASA's Last Space Shuttle Missions (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/090710-shuttle-mission-guide.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 12, 2009, 01:00 PM
Shuttle set to launch after 24-hour delay (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/07/12/space.shuttle.endeavour/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 12, 2009, 09:52 PM
Shuttle launch scrubbed for second straight day (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/07/12/space.shuttle.endeavour/index.html)

A line of lightning-producing thunderstorms approaching Florida's Kennedy Space Center has forced a scrub of this evening's planned launch of space shuttle Endeavour.

NASA will try again to launch Endeavour on Monday evening.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 14, 2009, 09:38 AM
So te weather ***** on the shuttle again:  Shuttle launch postponed for third straight day (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/07/13/space.nasa.endeavour/index.html)

Quote
NASA said it will next try to launch Endeavour at 6:03 p.m. Wednesday.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 15, 2009, 10:39 PM
Space shuttle Endeavour blasts off after several postponements (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/07/15/space.shuttle.endeavour/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090715-sts127-launch1-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour blasts off from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 15, 2009 after five false starts to begin the STS-127 mission to the ISS. Credit: NASA TV.

Moon Orbiter to Photograph Apollo 11 Landing Site (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/090715-apollo-landing-site.html)

NASA's sharp-eyed Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter is gearing up to look down on the Apollo 11 landing site – the location of the first human foray to the moon 40 years ago this month.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Hemish on July 16, 2009, 04:11 AM
They showed it on the news this morning.
Still after all the lift offs it gives me goose bumps watching it.
Truly awesome
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 16, 2009, 04:46 AM
I was just watching the launch on the NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/index.html) site, sure a thing of beauty.  8)

For those who watched & remembered, today marks the 40th Anniversary of the launch of Apollo 11. On July 16, 1969, mans greatest technological achievement was launched carrying Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins & Buzz Aldrin to the moon. Damn! 40 years & we still have not really reached the limits of space.

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/b0/Ap11-s69-31740.jpg)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/archive/a/ac/20070730185954!Apollo_11_launch.jpg)


Quote
"I believe that this nation should commit itself to achieving the goal, before this decade is out, of landing a man on the Moon and returning him safely to the Earth."
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 16, 2009, 04:43 PM
The NASA site has put up partial restoration HD videos (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/hd/apollo11.html) of the Apollo 11 mission.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jayson on July 16, 2009, 06:31 PM
Oops! Moon landing tapes got erased, NASA admits (http://uk.news.yahoo.com/22/20090716/tsc-uk-nasa-tapes-sb-a337f0f.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 17, 2009, 05:14 AM
NASA not 'overly concerned' with dings on shuttle (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/07/16/space.shuttle.endeavour/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 17, 2009, 10:11 AM
Quote
5 Shuttle Launch Scrubs Cost Millions

The repeated launch delays for the space shuttle Endeavour were not just frustrating, but expensive.

NASA estimates every launch cancelled after fuel tanking has begun can cost as much as $1.2 million dollars. Endeavour endured five liftoff scrubs before successfully launching Wednesday at 6:03 p.m. (2203 GMT), though some of these cancellations occurred before ground crews started loading propellant into the shuttle's external tank. The total price tag for this mission's postponements, which began in mid-June and ended with yesterday's liftoff, was less than $5 million, NASA spokesman Allard Beutel said.

Though NASA tries to operate as cheaply as possible, safety comes first, Beutel said

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090716-sts127-tankclose-02.jpg)

A close-up of the shuttle Endeavour's external tank reveals small strips of lost foam insulation on the intertank, a region between the vessel's liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen tanks. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090716-sts127-tankovw-02.jpg)

This NASA image highlights areas of suspected foam insulation loss from the shuttle Endeaovur's external tank after its July 15, 2009 launch. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: jedi_master_sal on July 17, 2009, 10:40 AM
We've barely scratched the surface, so to speak, when it comes to space exploration.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on July 17, 2009, 12:23 PM
HUGE space travel problem may have been solved! (http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-3748014,00.html)

If this pans out, astronauts won't need to worry about radiation at all.  That's a massive obstacle overcome!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 18, 2009, 11:34 AM
Shuttle, space station crews have record-setting rendezvous (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/07/17/space.shuttle.docking/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090717-sts127-flip-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour's performs an orbital backflip to allow station astronauts to photograph its tile-covered belly just before docking on July 17, 2009. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090717-sts127-dock-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour is seen docked at the International Space Station after arriving on July 17, 2009 during NASA's STS-127 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on July 19, 2009, 10:28 PM
don't know how long it's been at that price, but HBO's From the Earth to the Moon box set was at Walmart tonight for $13.  Last time I saw it was priced above 50. 
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on July 19, 2009, 10:45 PM
ufo's anyone?  I saw the AZ lights in Vegas back in 97 or 98 when we had an ellipse.  Lasted about 30-50 mins or so, but I had no camera so apparently it never happend and everyone else was too busy partying to notice beyond my friends.  Crazy balls of lights igniting and then burning out in sequence.  It hit the news, but only a handful of people were watching the sky that night.

no joke..........
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 20, 2009, 04:37 AM
KInda busy in space, one of two toilets on the ISS crapped out, a few space walks etc...

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090718-jef-02.jpg)

The space shuttle robotic arm grabs the Japanese Exposed Facility to move it out of Endeavour's cargo bay. Astronauts then passed the facility off to the space station robotic arm to connect the platform to the station's Kibo lab. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090718-eva1-02.jpg)

Spacewalker Tim Kopra works in the payload bay of space shuttle Endeavour as the International Space Station’s Canadarm2 robotic arm hands the Japanese Exposed Facility to the shuttle’s Canadarm robotic arm. Credit: NASA TV.

40 years ago on July 20, 1969, Neil A. Armstrong & Buzz Aldrin landed on the moon while Michael Collins stayed behind in the command module. The world watched, & held their breath, man what a sight to behold.

Tranquility Base here, the Eagle has landed (http://www.maniacworld.com/Apollo_11.htm)

Then the world waited again as Neil Armstrong descended from the LEM.

That's one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind (http://www.maniacworld.com/Apollo_11_2.htm)

John F. Kennedy's speech (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Kza-iTe2100) speech starts to come true, landing a man on the moon before the decade is out.

Quote
We choose to go to the moon. We choose to go to the moon in this decade and do the other things, not because they are easy, but because they are hard, because that goal will serve to organize and measure the best of our energies and skills, because that challenge is one that we are willing to accept, one we are unwilling to postpone, and one which we intend to win, and the others, too.

(http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/kippsphotos/5454.jpg)

From LM window just after landing,

(http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/kippsphotos/5903.jpg)

Hi, I'm Buzz. Have a moon rock.

(http://history.nasa.gov/ap11ann/kippsphotos/5875.jpg)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/89/Apollo_11_bootprint.jpg/594px-Apollo_11_bootprint.jpg)

Now onto something special for the 40th Anniversary of the 1st moon landing & for those conspiracy theorists. Pictures from the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter of the Apollo 11 landing site & other Apollo landing sites.

LRO Sees Apollo Landing Sites (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LRO/multimedia/lroimages/apollosites.html)

Clicky pics for larger image.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369234main_lroc_apollo11labeled_256x256.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369440main_lroc_apollo11_lrg.jpg)

Apollo 11 lunar module, Eagle.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369238main_lroc_apollo15labeled_256x256.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369442main_lroc_apollo15_lrg.jpg)

Apollo 15 lunar module, Falcon.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369240main_lroc_apollo16labeled_256x256.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369443main_lroc_apollo16_lrg.jpg)

Apollo 16 lunar module, Orion.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369242main_lroc_apollo17labeled_256x256.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369444main_lroc_apollo17_lrg.jpg)

Apollo 17 lunar module, Challenger.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369236main_lroc_apollo14labeled_522x256.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369441main_lroc_apollo14_lrg.jpg)

Apollo 14 lunar module, Antares.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369228main_ap14labeled_540.jpg)

So I say to those conspiracy theorists, kiss my ass!   ;D   :-*
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darby on July 20, 2009, 10:42 AM
Awesome.   ;D

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on July 20, 2009, 10:55 AM
So I say to those conspiracy theorists, kiss my ass!   ;D   :-*

It's obviously been Photoshopped.   :-*
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 20, 2009, 11:03 AM
So I say to those conspiracy theorists, kiss my ass!   ;D   :-*

It's obviously been Photoshopped.   :-*

My ass has been Photoshopped?  (http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/cartmoon.gif)   :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on July 20, 2009, 11:07 AM
You wish...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 20, 2009, 11:15 AM
(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/Darth%20Vader/yousuck.gif)  (http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/Kubricks/NannerNanner2.gif)  (http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/Darth%20Vader/Nanner3.gif)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 21, 2009, 01:00 PM
Mystery impact leaves Earth-size mark on Jupiter (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/07/21/jupiter.nasa.meteor.scar/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090720-jupiter-hit-nasa-02.jpg)

This image shows a large impact on Jupiter's south polar region captured on July 20, 2009, by NASA's Infrared Telescope Facility in Mauna Kea, Hawaii. Image credit: NASA/JPL/Infrared Telescope Facility.

Jupiter Apparently Smacked by Rogue Object, New Images Reveal (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/090720-jupiter-new-impact.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on July 21, 2009, 01:30 PM
Mystery impact leaves Earth-size mark on Jupiter (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/07/21/jupiter.nasa.meteor.scar/index.html)

Perhaps it was your ass...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 21, 2009, 01:47 PM
Perhaps it was your ass...

(http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/blahblah.gif)   (http://www.telusplanet.net/public/djustus/divers010.gif)

Ya still suck Bill.   :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on July 22, 2009, 01:10 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAgjSHjlT9I
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 22, 2009, 02:53 AM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LAgjSHjlT9I

That one has been played a million times & I still get a kick out of it.  ;D

Quote
Holy...living...****. Jesus H. Christ in a chicken basket....we're on the ******* moon.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 22, 2009, 03:36 AM
Raw Video: Solar Eclipse Covers Parts of Asia (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=E-wflBLAiWY&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fnews%2Egoogle%2Eca%2Fnews%3Fhl%3Den%26q%3DSolar%2520Eclipse%26um%3D1%26ie%3DUTF%2D8%26sa%3DN%26tab%3Dwn&feature=player_embedded)

FULL Solar Eclipse India 2009 July 22 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kKNNhbILWsY&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Elehighvalleylive%2Ecom%2Fbreaking%2Dnews%2Findex%2Essf%2F2009%2F07%2Fsolar%5Feclipse%5F2009%5Flongest%5Fof%2Ehtml&feature=player_embedded)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 24, 2009, 07:17 PM
Quote
July 24, 2009: NASA scientists have interrupted the checkout and calibration of the Hubble Space Telescope to aim the recently refurbished observatory at a new expanding spot on the giant planet Jupiter. The spot, caused by the impact of a comet or an asteroid, is changing day to day in the planet's cloud tops. The Hubble picture, taken on July 23, is the sharpest visible-light picture taken of the impact feature. The observations were made with Hubble's new camera, the Wide Field Camera 3 (WFC3). WFC3 is not yet fully calibrated, and while it is possible to obtain celestial images, the camera's full power cannot yet be realized for most observations. The WFC3 can still return meaningful science images that will complement the Jupiter pictures being taken with ground-based telescopes

(http://imgsrc.hubblesite.org/hu/db/images/hs-2009-23-a-web_print.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 29, 2009, 03:53 AM
The space shuttle Endeavour cast off from the International Space Station Tuesday after a whirlwind 11 days of construction work at the orbiting laboratory.

Endeavour is due to land in Florida Friday at 10:47 a.m. EDT (1447 GMT) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090728-sts127-undockA-02.jpg)

Earth shines above in this image of the International Space Station's new Kibo lab porch, which extends from the main Kibo module as seen by an exterior camera as the shuttle Endeavour (bottom) undocked on July 28, 2009 during the STS-127 mission. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/0907127sts127-13crew-02.jpg)

A record 13 people assemble for a group photo on July 25, 2009, during the STS-127 mission to the ISS. The shuttle Endeavour crew includes astronauts Mark Polansky, Doug Hurley, Christopher Cassidy, Tom Marshburn and Dave Wolf along with Japanese astronaut Koichi Wakata and Canadian astronaut Julie Payette. The station crewmembers are Russian cosmonauts Gennady Padalka and Roman Romanenko, Canadian astronaut Robert Thirsk, European astronaut Frank DeWinne and NASA's Mike Barratt and Tim Kopra. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090728-sts127-undock-02.jpg)

The International Space Station is backlit by the blue Earth in this view from the shuttle Endeavour taken after its undocking on July 29, 2009. Endeavour's shadow can be seen on the solar arrays at the left of this view. Credit: NASA TV.

This site is cool.   8)

WeChooseTheMoon.org (http://www.wechoosethemoon.org/)

Quote
The John F. Kennedy Presidential Library and Museum has launched WeChooseTheMoon.org to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the first moon landing. The site, powered by AOL, recreates Apollo 11’s lunar mission, minute by minute, with an interactive experience that lets visitors experience the mission as it happened, using archival audio, video, photos and “real time” transmissions.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 29, 2009, 08:45 PM
Shuttle inspection finds no damage (http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2009/07/29/shuttle-endeavour-inspect-payette-landing.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090728-sts127-inspect-02.jpg)

The forward heat shield of the space shuttle Endeavour getsa close up in this photo taken by an ISS astronaut before the two spacecraft docked on July 17, 2009 during the STS-127 mission. Credit: NASA.


Space Shuttles May Have to Fly Beyond 2010, Panel Says (http://www.space.com/news/090729-nasa-shuttle-delay.html)

Panel backs NASA bid for bigger shuttle budget (http://www.reuters.com/article/latestCrisis/idUSB237881)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 30, 2009, 01:49 PM
Astronauts launch satellite, prep for landing day (http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/article/ALeqM5g8gpZRl3t8mV2RxsVjIuPU75dJeAD99OSCH00)

(http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/media/ALeqM5iEkbaH64NK0v7prgODNxbYKezaSw?size=l) 

This image provided by NASA shows the space shuttle Endeavour backdropped by a blue and white Earth, taken by a member of the Expedition 20 crew onboard the International Space Station shortly after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking separation on Tuesday July 28, 2009. (AP photo/NASA).

(http://www.google.com/hostednews/ap/media/ALeqM5iYUijzedKYIZGO6urV7mXb2gJ1ng?size=l)

In this July 28, 2009 photo provided by NASA, Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-127) is backdropped by a blue and white Earth, as photographed by an Expedition 20 crew member on the International Space Station soon after the shuttle and station began their post-undocking relative separation on July 28, 2009. (AP Photo/NASA).

Astronauts aboard the space shuttle Endeavour have tested their flight controls in anticipation of a planned landing back on Earth on Friday morning. Thursday should be the last full day in orbit for the shuttle before returning to NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for a planned 10:48 a.m. ET landing.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 31, 2009, 11:25 AM
The Shuttle Endeavour is on it's way home, I'm watching it live online. 23 mins till landing.  8)

Live coverage of STS-127 ISS/Space Shuttle Endeavour (http://www.ustream.tv/channel/spacevidcast)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 31, 2009, 11:48 AM
Beautiful landing, well done.  :)  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 1, 2009, 01:45 AM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/375368main_image_1435_800-600.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour kicks up dust as it touches down on Runway 15 at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on July 31, 2009 to complete the 16-day, 6.5-million mile journey on the STS-127 mission to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Hemish on August 2, 2009, 08:16 AM
Its a thing of beauty aint it
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt on August 12, 2009, 01:19 AM
Anyone watching the Perseids tonight?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 12, 2009, 01:48 AM
Cloudy up here with a storm warning so no show here tonight.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on August 12, 2009, 10:58 AM
There was just enough of a haze where you couldn't see anything.  Stars were obscured, as were the planets, but the moon still shone thru.  Oh well.  I caught the Leonids in 2001, which were amazing!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on August 12, 2009, 09:56 PM
weren't we supposed to be seeing those high res shots of the the Apollo landing sites by now?


mta:

never mind....answered my own question

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/369228main_ap14labeled_540.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on August 13, 2009, 10:57 AM
I wonder when we are going to get pictures of the alien base on the dark side of the moon?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 14, 2009, 06:15 AM
I wonder when we are going to get pictures of the alien base on the dark side of the moon?

Nope, it's underground...  ;)   :D

Has anyone seen this footage from the U2 spyplane... cool!  8)

Breathtaking Spy Plane Footage (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h0JyhDBqEfM)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on August 14, 2009, 10:51 AM
Did you notice the U2 has only two wheels? When coming in it has to balance itself on just those wheels. Amazing pictures. Not being able to scratch my face would drive me mad.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 20, 2009, 03:14 AM
Discovery set to launch next week for space station (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/08/19/shuttle.launch.advance/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/376274main_image_1438_800-600.jpg)

Rollout of space shuttle Discovery was slow-going due to the onset of lightning in the area of Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

First motion of the shuttle out of the Vehicle Assembly Building was at 2:07 a.m. Aug. 4. Discovery's 13-day flight will deliver a new crew member and 33,000 pounds of equipment to the International Space Station. The equipment includes science and storage racks, a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Launch of Discovery on its STS-128 mission is targeted for late August. Credit: Photo Courtesy of Justin Dernier/EPA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BrentS on August 20, 2009, 09:50 AM
That's an awesome photo!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 20, 2009, 09:57 AM
Yep, it sure is. Clicky the pic below for a full size of the image.  :)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/376272main_image_1438_428-321.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/376278main_2009-4403_full.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on August 20, 2009, 09:39 PM
I had to set that as my wallpaper. The earth really is an amazingly beautiful place. Thanks for the link to that U2 footage Dale that was great stuff. :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on August 20, 2009, 10:31 PM
I had to set that as my wallpaper.

I just did the same.  Beautiful!  I only have a 15" here at home, but this would look great with my dual 17" screens at work.   8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on August 20, 2009, 11:10 PM
The last of the GPS IIR-M Satellites launched. (http://www.ulalaunch.com/launch/GPSIIR-21/Highlights_GPSIIR21.wmv)

This is also the last time GPS will be launched on a Delta II launch vehicle.  The next one will be launched on the new Delta IV.

Needless to say, it's been pretty busy at work.   :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 20, 2009, 11:18 PM
Love this shot of that launch.   8)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Random/DeltaIILaunch.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on August 22, 2009, 12:34 AM
The next generation moon missions may be in jeorpardy (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/21134540/vp/32513996#32513996).  The reason why?  Budget cuts.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 25, 2009, 03:20 AM
Weather delays Space Shuttle Discovery launch (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/08/25/space.shuttle.launch/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BrentS on August 25, 2009, 10:34 AM
Weather delays Space Shuttle Discovery launch (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/08/25/space.shuttle.launch/index.html)

A friend of mine who is a huge NASA, Aeronautics, and Camera buff happened to be in Florida this week on business.  He was headed to watch the launch with his Canon 50D and f/2.8 300mm lens.  Hopefully it launches soon as I'd hate for him to miss his opportunity to get some of his own shots of it!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 25, 2009, 10:42 AM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/381077main_image_1453_800-600.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery is poised for liftoff on the STS-128 mission from Pad 39a at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., Monday, Aug. 24, 2009. Discovery is scheduled to launch early Tuesday morning at 1:36 a.m. EDT. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls.

Weather delays Space Shuttle Discovery launch (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/08/25/space.shuttle.launch/index.html)

A friend of mine who is a huge NASA, Aeronautics, and Camera buff happened to be in Florida this week on business.  He was headed to watch the launch with his Canon 50D and f/2.8 300mm lens.  Hopefully it launches soon as I'd hate for him to miss his opportunity to get some of his own shots of it!

Just hope your friend is wide awake for the launch if all goes well & if he does grab some shots, see if you can get a few to post.  :)

Quote
The mission to the international space station was postponed until 1:10 a.m. ET Wednesday, NASA said.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 26, 2009, 05:29 AM
Another day for a delay... Discovery launch postponed again (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/08/25/space.shuttle.launch/index.html)

Quote
Bad weather forced mission controllers to put off a pre-dawn launch Tuesday, while a second planned launch was scrubbed after a hydrogen valve failed to show up on controllers' displays as being closed. NASA now hopes to launch the shuttle at 12:22 a.m. Friday after new tests on the valve, which controls the flow of liquid hydrogen into the shuttle's external fuel tank, launch integration manager Mike Moses told reporters Tuesday night.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Logray2776 on August 29, 2009, 12:51 AM
Hey everybody, long time no see or type, how is everyone been doing?

Should have a good view from my side yard to see the launch hopefully in 7 minutes
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 29, 2009, 03:00 AM
Shuttle Discovery blasts off to space station (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/08/29/space.shuttle.discovery/index.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_launch_1_425.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery lifts off into the night sky on a mission to the International Space Station. Launch was on-time at 11:59 p.m. EDT. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090828-sts128-launch-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery soars into the night sky above the Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Aug. 28, 2009 at 11:59 pm ET to begin a 13-day mission to the International Space Station. Credit: Robert Pearlman/collectSPACE.com.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/381971main_image_1457_800-600.jpg)

Viewed from the Banana River Viewing Site at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, space shuttle Discovery arcs through a cloud-brushed sky, lighted by the trail of fire after launch on the STS-128 mission. Liftoff from Launch Pad 39A was on time at 11:59 p.m. EDT. The first launch attempt on Aug. 24 was postponed due to unfavorable weather conditions. The second attempt on Aug. 25 also was postponed due to an issue with a valve in space shuttle Discovery's main propulsion system.

The STS-128 mission is the 30th International Space Station assembly flight and the 128th space shuttle flight. The 13-day mission will deliver more than 7 tons of supplies, science racks and equipment, as well as additional environmental hardware to sustain six crew members on the International Space Station. The equipment includes a freezer to store research samples, a new sleeping compartment and the COLBERT treadmill. Credit: NASA/Ben Cooper.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090824-sts128-colbertviews-02.jpg)

NASA's newest astronaut treadmill, named COLBERT after comedian Stephen Colbert, will launch aboard the space shuttle Discovery's STS-128 mission on Aug. 25, 2009. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: efranks on August 30, 2009, 01:47 AM

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/381971main_image_1457_800-600.jpg)


That's a great photo of the launch.

   E...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Hemish on August 30, 2009, 07:51 AM
I said it before and i'll say it again, I never get tired of looking at shuttle launches, its a thing of beauty.
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/381971main_image_1457_800-600.jpg)
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090828-sts128-launch-02.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 30, 2009, 09:50 AM
It sure is a thing of beauty, I'm really going to miss the shuttles when the day comes but then again...

Proposed reprieve for shuttle could help relaunch US space programme (http://www.guardian.co.uk/science/2009/aug/30/british-astronaut-space-shuttle-hopes)

For those that missed the lauch, clicky below.   :)

STS 128 Shuttle Discovery Launch ext 28 August, 2009 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vnQTf-qZcMY&feature=related)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090829-sts128-launchrear-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery hurtles toward space on the STS-128 mission on Aug. 28, 2009. Below the main engine nozzles are the blue mach diamonds, a formation of shock waves in the exhaust plume of an aerospace propulsion system. Credit: NASA/Tony Gray-Tom Ferrer.

Crew Ready for Docking After Heat Shield Inspections

During their first full day in space, astronauts aboard Discovery conducted a daylong inspection of the space shuttle’s thermal protection system, checked out spacesuits and prepared to dock with the International Space Station.

With Commander Rick Sturckow at the controls, Discovery is scheduled to link up with the space station at 8:03 p.m. CDT Sunday.

Pilot Kevin Ford and mission specialists Patrick Forrester and Jose Hernandez took turns using the 50-foot-long Orbiter Boom Sensor System, attached to the shuttle’s robotic arm, to inspect the shuttle’s right wing, nose cap and left wing.

Mission specialists Danny Olivas, Christer Fuglesang and Nicole Stott completed a two-hour checkout of the spacesuits that will be used during three spacewalks planned for the docked phase of the mission.

Docking preparations occupied the remainder of the crew’s workday. The crew tested equipment that will be used for rendezvous operations.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/379663main_colbert_226x170.jpg)

The C.O.L.B.E.R.T decal is placed on the Combined Operational Load Bearing External Resistance Treadmill. Credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 31, 2009, 10:46 AM
(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090830-sts128-dock2-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery as seen from the International Space Station prior to performing the rendezvous pitch maneuver or "back flip" just ahead of docking on Aug. 30, 2009, during the STS-128 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/*******-02.jpg)

This view from a camera aboard the shuttle Discovery shows the International Space Station just before the two spacecraft docked on Aug. 30, 2009 high above the Atlantic Ocean. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 2, 2009, 10:22 AM
Oh brother!  ::)

Conspiracy Theorist Convinces Neil Armstrong Moon Landing Was Faked (http://www.theonion.com/content/news/conspiracy_theorist_convinces_neil?utm_source=a-section)

Hi, I'm Buzz. Have a moon rock!  :D

Moon Rock Turns Out to be Fake (http://www.physorg.com/news171006198.html)

Fake Dutch 'moon rock' revealed (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/europe/8226075.stm)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on September 2, 2009, 10:44 AM
It's funny how the picture on both the moon rock articles is different. It looks like BBC got a picture of the real fake rock. It totally looks like petaifed wood to me.

The Onion is always great for a laugh.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 5, 2009, 09:32 PM
Japan's First Space Cargo Ship Ready to Fly

Japan's first unmanned spacecraft to haul cargo to the International Space Station (ISS) is nearly ready for its maiden launch next week.

The new cargo ship is poised to launch toward the station on Sept. 10 at 1:01 p.m. EDT (1701 GMT) from the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan on a shakedown cruise. If all goes well, the inaugural spacecraft, called the H-2 Transfer Vehicle 1 (HTV-1), should arrive at the station on Sept. 17.

The spacecraft was built by JAXA, Japan's space agency, and will launch atop the country's brand new H-2B rocket. It will be early Sept. 11 Local Time at the Japanese launch site at the time of liftoff.

"JAXA is ready to carry out the important HTV-1 mission as a new contribution to the ISS program," said Masazumi Miyake, director of the JAXA office at NASA's Johnson Space Center in Houston, in a Wednesday briefing.

JAXA mission managers are expected to hold a series of final readiness reviews for HTV-1 and its rocket booster to make sure it's ready for launch day.

"There's very little work to be done," said Mike Suffredini, NASA's space station program manager. "We're all on schedule and we're not working any issues relative to this launch."

Suffredini said that the new spacecraft, like cargo ships built by Europe and Russia, will be vital to support the space station's six-person crew once NASA's space shuttle fleet retires in the next year or so.

The HTV-1 cargo ship is Japan's latest contribution to the International Space Station. Astronauts completed construction of JAXA's enormous Kibo laboratory, a $1 billion facility the size of a tour bus, in July with the addition of an exterior experiment porch.

The spacecraft is a solar-powered cylinder about 33 feet (10 meters) long and 14 feet (4.4 meters) wide. It can haul up to 6 tons of pressurized and unpressurized cargo to the station, but will only be packed with about 3 1/2 tons for its debut flight.

Unlike the automated cargo ships built by Russia and Europe, which can dock themselves at the station, the HTV-1 is designed to fly close to the orbiting laboratory and be grabbed by its robotic arm. Astronauts inside the outpost will oversee the approach, rendezvous and grapple.

After about a month at the space station, the disposable cargo ship is expected to be detached from the outpost and commanded to intentionally burn up in the Earth's atmosphere over the southern Pacific Ocean.

Miyake said JAXA has spent about $680 million since 1997 to develop the HTV spacecraft. The vehicle alone costs about $220 million, he said.

The new H-2B rocket launching the HTV-1 cargo ship is a more powerful booster derived from Japan's workhorse H-2A rocket, which the country has been flying since 2001.

The HTV spacecraft will be controlled from JAXA's Tsukuba Space Center, which is also home to the agency's Kibo mission control center.

Japan has until Sept. 30 to try and loft the HTV-1 mission from its seaside launch site before its window closes due to the country's off-shore fishing season. The next opportunity to launch the spacecraft after September is in February 2010, Suffredini said. Credit: Tariq Malik Managing Editor Space.com.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090902-h2b-rocket-02.jpg)

JAXA's debut H-2B rocket stands poised atop its launch pad at the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan, where it awaits the delivery of its payload - the first HTV cargo ship. Credit: JAXA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090902-htv-cutaway-02.jpg)

This diagram released by NASA and JAXA depicts Japan's new H-2 Transfer Vehicle, a 10-meter long unmanned space freighter to deliver internal and external cargo to the ISS. Credit: NASA/JAXA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090902-htv-art-02.jpg)

An artist's interpretation of Japan's H-2 Transfer Vehicle arriving at the International Space Station. Credit: JAXA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/382650main_image_1459_800-600.jpg)

Backdropped by Earth's horizon and the blackness of space, the Leonardo Multi-Purpose Logistics Module is visible in Discovery's payload bay, as is the shuttle's vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system pods, Orbiter Boom Sensor System and docking mechanism in this image shot from an aft flight deck window.

For the STS-128 mission, Leonardo carried 7.5 tons of supplies to the station, including two research racks (the Fluid Integrated Rack and the Materials Science Research Rack), a new station crew quarters, the Minus Eighty-Degree Laboratory Freezer for ISS (MELFI-2), the Air Revitalization System Rack and the COLBERT treadmill. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/383322main_image_1461_800-600.jpg)

Expedition 20 flight engineer Nicole Stott participates in the STS-128 mission's first spacewalk as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station. During the six-hour, 35-minute spacewalk, Stott and astronaut Danny Olivas (out of frame) removed an empty ammonia tank from the station's truss and temporarily stowed it on the station's robotic arm. Olivas and Stott also retrieved the European Technology Exposure Facility and Materials International Space Station Experiment from the Columbus laboratory module and installed them on Discovery's payload bay for return. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/383550main_image_1462_800-600.jpg)

As part the STS-128 mission's first spacewalk, astronauts Danny Olivas and Nicole Stott (right) removed an empty ammonia tank from the station's truss and temporarily stowed it on the station's robotic arm. Olivas and Stott also retrieved the European Technology Exposure Facility (EuTEF) and Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) from the Columbus laboratory module and installed them on Discovery’s payload bay for return. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on September 10, 2009, 09:55 AM
New Hubble images (http://www.hubblesite.org/newscenter/archive/releases/2009/25/image/f/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 10, 2009, 04:13 PM
Sweet, awesome images.  8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/384568main_ero_ngc6302_4x3_800-600.jpg)

NGC 6302: Butterfly Emerges from Stellar Demise in Planetary Nebula NGC 6302.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/384937main_ero_teaser_ngc6217_4x3_800-600.jpg)

NGC 6217: Barred Spiral Galaxy NGC 6217.

Japan's first space cargo ship soared into orbit Thursday to begin its maiden cruise to the International Space Station.

The inaugural H-2 Transfer Vehicle (HTV-1) blazed into a predawn sky above its seaside launch pad at the Tanegashima Space Center in southern Japan, where the local time was 2:01 a.m. Friday at the time of liftoff. It was still Thursday in the United States, where NASA officials at space station Mission Control in Houston and other centers monitored the launch

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090910-htv-launch-02.jpg)

The Japanese H-2 Transfer Vehicle lifts off from the Tanegashima Space Center in Japan on Sept. 10, 2009 EDT (Sept. 11, 2009 Local Time) on its maiden flight to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA TV/JAXA.

STS-128 Crew Prepares for Landing

The astronauts on space shuttle Discovery are ready to wrap up a nearly 13-day flight with a landing this evening at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

Space shuttle Discovery performed an orbital adjustment burn at 12:02 p.m. EDT to avoid an unidentified piece of debris. Although unclear, the object is believed to be from the mission's third spacewalk.

The deorbit burn for today’s first landing opportunity today, on orbit 202, is at 5:59 p.m. Discovery would cross above southern Mexico and the Gulf of Mexico, skirt west of Cuba and cross the Florida coast above Sarasota, with landing at Kennedy’s runway 15 at 7:05 p.m. A second landing opportunity at Kennedy today would put the shuttle and crew on the ground at 8:42 p.m. The weather forecast for both opportunities today calls for a chance of thunderstorms within 30 nautical miles of the Shuttle Landing Facility.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090910-sts128-earthshuttle-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery is backlit by the limb of a bright blue Earth and the blackness of space in this view from a camera on the International Space Station after undocking on Sept. 8, 2009 during the STS-128 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090910-sts128-postiss-02.jpg)

The International Space Station is seen from space shuttle Discovery as the two spacecraft begin their relative separation on Sept. 8, 2009 after nine days of docked time during the STS-128 mission. Credit: NASA.

I love that shot of the ISS.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 10, 2009, 07:44 PM
First Discovery landing opportunity scrubbed (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/09/10/space.shuttle.landing/index.html)

Quote
NASA ordered astronauts aboard the space shuttle Discovery to circle the Earth at least one more time Thursday after bad weather thwarted the spacecraft's first of two possible landing attempts.

Discovery was slated to land just after 7 p.m. EDT (2300 GMT) at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, but unexpectedly high crosswinds and thunderstorms prevented its return. The shuttle has one more chance to land today at 8:40 p.m. EDT (0040 Sept. 11 GMT), but poor weather conditions are also expected.

Update:  Shuttle Discovery landing scrubbed for Thursday (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/09/10/space.shuttle.landing/index.html)

Quote
The space shuttle Discovery will stay aloft another day after NASA mission managers scrubbed its second and final opportunity to land Thursday, citing bad weather near Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

The next landing opportunity for Discovery will come shortly before 6 p.m. ET on Friday, officials said. That landing would also take place in Florida,

ATK and NASA Successfully Test Ares First Stage Development Motor (http://www.reuters.com/article/pressRelease/idUS190850+10-Sep-2009+PRN20090910)

NASA and ATK Successfully Test Ares First Stage Motor ' (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2009/sep/HQ_09-198_Ares_DM-1_test.html)

Check out the video of the test below.  8)

NASA Ares I Solid Rocket Motor Test (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rsPnkJ5vLfc&eurl=http%3A%2F%2Fwww%2Espaceref%2Ecom%2Fnews%2Fviewpr%2Ehtml%3Fpid%3D29146&feature=player_embedded)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on September 11, 2009, 01:26 PM
(http://blog.newsok.com/bamsblog/files/2009/07/from_the_earth_to_the_moon_dvd.jpg)

bought at walmart last week for $13.00!!!  Loved this series...couldn't believe it was this cheap.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 12, 2009, 04:33 AM
A very good deal on the DVD set, nice score.  8)

Space shuttle Discovery lands in California (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/09/11/space.shuttle.landing/index.html)

Clicky the pic below for a full size of the image.  :)   8)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_sts128landingmain425x.jpg) (http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/180842main_ED09-0253-02.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 16, 2009, 02:42 PM
'Giga Galaxy Zoom' offers tour of Milky Way (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/09/16/galaxy.interactive.image/index.html)

Clicky link below for the tour.   8)

GigaGalaxyZoom.org (http://www.gigagalaxyzoom.org/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 16, 2009, 11:47 PM
First rocky planet found outside solar system (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/09/16/new.rocky.planet/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on September 17, 2009, 10:40 AM
First rocky planet found outside solar system (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/09/16/new.rocky.planet/index.html)

Cool! They found Mustafar.

(http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2005/06/photogalleries/starwarsgalaxy/images/primary/mustafar.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: GrandMoffNick on September 17, 2009, 10:47 AM
That's the first thing I said when I saw this last night and my wife looked at me with her "man I can't believe I married such a nerd look."
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 25, 2009, 03:29 AM
NASA: There is water in lunar soil (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/09/24/moon.water/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on September 25, 2009, 10:54 AM
Arthur C. Clark knew that.  :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 4, 2009, 03:53 AM
The sixth man to orbit the Earth, Pavel Romanovich Popovich died Wednesday, five days before his 79th birthday. According to officials in Russia, his death came following a stroke at a hospital in Gurzuf on Ukraine's Crimean Peninsula.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091001-pavel-02.jpg)

Cosmonaut Pavel Popovich is shown in a still picture during his Vostok 4 mission in August 1962. Credit: Asif Siddiqi/NASA

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090917-buzz-lightyear-shuttle-02.jpg)

Buzz Lightyear in front of the space shuttle Discovery after is record 468 days in space. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091002-buzz-02.jpg)

Buzz Lightyear floats aboard the International Space Station during his 468 day mission. Credit: NASA.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091002-lightyear-parade-02.jpg)

Buzz Lightyear, having returned to Earth after more than a year aboard the International Space Station, drives down Disney's Magic Kingdom Main Street USA during a ticker-tape parade in his honor. Credit: collectSPACE.com

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/090930-exp21-launch-02.jpg)

The Soyuz TMA-16 rocket launches from the Baikonur Cosmodrome in Kazakhstan, carrying Canadian space tourist Guy Laliberte and professional spaceflyers Jeff Williams and Maxim Suraev. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091002-crew-02.jpg)

The Expedition 20 and 21 crewmembers gathered on the International Space Station Oct. 2 after NASA astronaut Jeff Williams, Russian cosmonaut Maxim Suraev, and Canadian space tourist Guy Laliberte arrived onboard. Credit: NASA TV.

Space Odyssey: Clown's first performance (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3cdxpZHYc6I&feature=player_embedded)

Kennedy Space Center Begins Layoffs (http://www.wesh.com/cnn-news/21191757/detail.html)   :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 7, 2009, 10:03 AM
Scientists discover massive ring around Saturn (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/10/07/space.saturn.ring/index.html)

Mauna Kea scopes will be used to observe when NASA crafts hit the moon (http://www.starbulletin.com/news/20091007_Lunar_dust-up.html)

Southern Arizona Telescopes Will Point at Lunar Impact Early Friday  (http://uanews.org/node/27833)

How to watch NASA’s big crash on the moon
Rocket motor to smash into lunar south pole Friday to find hidden water ice (http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/33196816/ns/technology_and_science-space/)

LCROSS Project Site (http://lcross.arc.nasa.gov/)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/080226-lcross-02.jpg)

An artist's depiction of the LCROSS moon-smashing mission as the Shepherding Spacecraft (left) pulls free of the Centaur upper stage impactor. Credit: NASA/Ames.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on October 7, 2009, 10:09 AM
Saw the massive Saturn ring article. Pretty freaky. Gravity is an amazing thing.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 9, 2009, 02:40 AM
Just a reminder that the LCROSS probe is set to blow the moon out of orbit at 7:31 a.m. ET friday morning.

You can watch it live on the NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/ntv) starting at 3:15 am PDT or 6:15 am EDT.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/392737main_centaur1_428.jpg)

Image of the Centaur separation as viewed from the infrared camera.
Credit: NASA.

All said & done, it should look like this...  :D

(http://www.fanboy.com/wp-content/uploads/2009/09/space1999-01.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 9, 2009, 09:28 AM
NASA crashes on the moon -- twice (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/10/09/probe.moon.crash/index.html)

Hopefully a video and or pics will be up for viewing.  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on October 9, 2009, 09:41 AM
My wife watched it live on TV... said it was anticlimactic.  Said the news anchors just kind of looked at each other perplexed that nothing happened.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 9, 2009, 09:47 AM
I was watching the live feed on the Nasa channel at work with roughly 15 mins to impact & I got called away & missed it, frickin cons.  >:(

(http://www.nasa.gov/392801main_vlcsnap-2009-10-09-03h44m45s186_full.png)

The LCROSS mission operations team initiated power-up of the LCROSS science payload and saw this view of the moon.

Quote
The LCROSS Centaur and Spacecraft impacted the moon at approximately 4:30 a.m. PDT. Scientists are reviewing the initial data and will report what they know at a Post Impact News Conference at 7:00 a.m. PDT / 10:00 a.m. EDT on NASA TV.

Also added the the LCROSS mission was dedicated to the memory of Walter Cronkite, CBS news anchor who became the voice of NASA to the public as he covered the early days of the space program & the historic 1969 moon landing.   8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on October 9, 2009, 11:06 AM
My wife watched it live on TV... said it was anticlimactic.  Said the news anchors just kind of looked at each other perplexed that nothing happened.

Yeah it was pretty lame - they were trying to make a big deal out of it and all but nothing really happened.  Then a few minutes later they're playing clips from Bugs Bunny when he crashed into the moon...Pretty funny stuff.  (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-happy006.gif) (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 9, 2009, 11:23 AM
They showed Haredevil Hare! "Where's the kaboom? There was supposed to be an Earth Moon-shattering kaboom!"   :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: efranks on October 9, 2009, 12:22 PM
I haven't been following all the stuff on this but, seriously, what did they expect?  A Michael Bay production?  At best you were going to get a puff of dirt.

I chose sleep over getting up for this.  I'll watch the NASA videos online later. 

   E...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 11, 2009, 07:02 AM
After 11 years and $44 billion, the international space station may be scuttled. (http://www.cnn.com/video/#/video/tech/2009/10/09/zarrella.space.station.future.cnn)

Last Moments of LCROSS - NASA Probes Hit Moon (http://www.space.com/common/media/video/player.php?videoRef=SP_091009_LCROSS-impact)

Expedition 20 Commander Gennady Padalka, Flight Engineer Michael Barratt and Canadian spaceflight participant Guy Laliberte have returned to Earth, landing on the steppe of Kazakhstan in their Soyuz TMA-14 spacecraft. Landing occurred at 12:32 a.m. EDT, 10:32 a.m. Kazakhstan time.

Padalka and Barratt stayed aboard the orbiting laboratory for 197 days. The duo arrived at the station in March to begin Expedition 19 then transitioned to the six-member Expedition 20 crew in May. Padalka commanded both Expedition crews. Laliberte launched Sept. 30 with the Expedition 21 crew and spent nine days on the station.

The three were scheduled to fly back to the Gagarin Cosmonaut Training Center in Star City, Russia outside Moscow early Sunday for reunions with their families, and for Padalka and Barratt, the start of their reorientation to a gravity environment after a half year off the planet.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/160328main_exp20_barratt_landing.jpg)

Expedition 20 Flight Engineer Michael Barratt is surrounded by support personnel shortly after landing in Kazakhstan. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 19, 2009, 10:58 PM
32 planets discovered outside solar system (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/science/10/19/space.new.planets/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 27, 2009, 03:50 AM
NASA's Ares rocket set for test flight (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/10/26/ares.nasa.test/index.html)

Quote
For the first time in decades, a rocket instead of a space shuttle is occupying launchpad 39-B at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091026-ares-1x-prelaunch-02.jpg)

Nightfall comes to Launch Complex 39B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on Oct. 23, 2009, as xenon lights reveal the Ares I-X rocket awaiting the approaching Oct. 27 liftoff of its flight test. This is the first time since the Apollo Program's Saturn rockets were retired that a vehicle other than the space shuttle has occupied the pad. Credit: NASA Kim Shiflett.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 27, 2009, 09:42 AM
Winds delay NASA launch of world's largest rocket (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/10/27/ares.nasa.rocket/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091026-atlantis-ares1x-02.jpg)

NASA's space shuttle Atlantis awaits liftoff from Launch Pad 39A (right) at the Kennedy Space Center, Fla., while the Ares I-X rocket is poised for its own blast off from from Launch Pad 39B, in the background. The Ares I-X flight test is set for Oct. 27; Atlantis' STS-129 launch to the International Space Station is targeted for Nov. 16. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091026-ares1x-atlantisA-02.jpg)

At NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the 327-foot-tall Ares I-X rocket (left) awaits a late October 2009 liftoff on Launch Pad 39B on its upcoming flight test. In the distance are space shuttle Atlantis (right) atop Launch Pad 39A, and the pads and processing facilities on Cape Canaveral Air Force Station. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 27, 2009, 12:45 PM
NASA scrubs launch of Ares I-X rocket (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/10/27/ares.nasa.rocket/index.html)

Quote
NASA said it will try again to launch at 8 a.m. Wednesday.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 28, 2009, 12:27 PM
Go for launch! Less than 2 minutes.

Live on NASA TV Online (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 28, 2009, 12:29 PM
We have a launch... Go baby go!   8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 28, 2009, 12:38 PM
Quote
Liftoff! The Ares I-X Flight Test Begins
Wed, 28 Oct 2009 09:30:38 AM MDT

Rising into the Florida sky, the 327-foot rocket thunders away from the launch pad, marking the first time a new vehicle has launched from the complex since the first space shuttle launch in 1981.

The mission will last two minutes, during which constant data received from the rocket.

At about the T+2 minute point in the flight, the upper stage simulator and first stage will separate at approximately 130,000 feet over the Atlantic Ocean. The unpowered simulator will splash down in the ocean. The first stage will be fired for a controlled ocean landing with parachutes that will allow recovery by one of NASA's booster recovery ships, while the other ship tracks the upper stage.

Boom baby, success!   8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 28, 2009, 01:20 PM
Video up on the launch:  Ares I-X Rocket Test Flight Launch (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cDi2xSMJllk)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 4, 2009, 10:07 AM
Successful Flight Through Enceladus Plume (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/cassini/whycassini/cassini20091103.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/398915main_cassini20091103-a-516.jpg)

In this unprocessed image, sunlight brightens a crescent curve along the edge of Saturn's moon Enceladus and highlights its misty plume. The image was captured by Cassini's narrow-angle camera as the spacecraft passed about 190,000 kilometers (120,000 miles) over the moon. This image has not been validated or calibrated. A validated/calibrated image will be archived with the NASA Planetary Data System in 2010. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.

Fabulous! Enceladus Raw Flyby Images (http://spacefellowship.com/2009/11/03/fabulous-enceladus-raw-flyby-images/)

These raw, unprocessed images were taken during Cassini's close flyby of Enceladus on Nov. 2, 2009. The most recent Enceladus maps also are included here. (http://ciclops.org/view_event/119/Enceladus_Rev_120_Flyby_Raw_Preview?js=1)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 13, 2009, 12:17 PM
NASA Discovers Large Lunar Ice Field (http://www.ktvu.com/news/21605721/detail.html)

NASA'S LCROSS Impacts Confirm Water In Lunar Crater (http://www.prnewswire.com/news-releases/nasas-lcross-impacts-confirm-water-in-lunar-crater-69977192.html)

Got Water? Yes and a Whole Lot More! (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/LCROSS/main/prelim_water_results.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/402247main_LCROSS_results1_full.jpg)

The visible camera image showing the ejecta plume at about 20 seconds after impact.
Credit: NASA.

Sweet news, I'm thirsty.   :D  Hungry too...  :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on November 13, 2009, 02:47 PM
Disclosure (http://www.examiner.com/x-2383-Honolulu-Exopolitics-Examiner~y2009m10d21-Official-disclosure-of-extraterrestrial-life-is-imminent)   (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys/smiley-confused004.gif) (http://www.freesmileys.org/smileys.php)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on November 13, 2009, 03:05 PM
That reads like a really good fake news article.   ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 16, 2009, 12:07 AM
The skies above NASA's Florida spaceport look to be clear for tomorrow's planned launch of the space shuttle Atlantis.

Atlantis is slated to lift off at 2:28 p.m. EST (1928 GMT) on Nov. 16 from Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091014-sts129-rollout-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis atop the crawler-transporter makes its way up the steep incline to Launch Pad 39A on Oct. 14, 2009 for a planned Nov. 16 launch. Credit: NASA/KSC.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_atl-rss-425.jpg)

As the sun sets behind Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, the rotating service structure has been moved away from space shuttle Atlantis. Photo credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.

Six space shuttle flights remaining till...  :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 16, 2009, 09:27 AM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/402870main_image_1516_800-600.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis is seen on Launch Pad 39a of the NASA Kennedy Space Center shortly after the rotating service structure was rolled back, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2009, Cape Canaveral, FL. Atlantis is scheduled to launch at 2:28p.m. EST on the STS-129 mission to the International Space Station on Monday, Nov. 16, 2009. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls.


Leonid Meteor Shower tonight.  8)

One of the best annual meteor showers will peak in the pre-dawn hours Tuesday, and for some skywatchers the show could be quite impressive.

The best seats are in Asia, but North American observers should be treated to an above average performance of the Leonid meteor shower, weather permitting. The trick for all observers is to head outside in the wee hours of the morning – between 1 a.m. and dawn – regardless where you live.

The Leonids put on a solid show every year, if skies are clear and moonlight does not interfere. This year the moon is near its new phase, and not a factor. For anyone in the Northern Hemisphere with dark skies, away from urban and suburban lighting, the show should be worth getting up early to see.

"We're predicting 20 to 30 meteors per hour over the Americas, and as many as 200 to 300 per hour over Asia," said Bill Cooke of NASA's Meteoroid Environment Office. Other astronomers who work in the nascent field of meteor shower prediction have put out similar forecasts.

Urban dwellers and suburbanites will see far fewer, as the fainter meteors will be drowned out by local lights.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 16, 2009, 02:27 PM
The shuttle Atlantis has cleared the tower!  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jeff on November 16, 2009, 02:39 PM
Maybe this is old news, but I just found out about it this past weekend from a friend - the NASA App for the iPhone or iPod Touch.

I downloaded the app this past weekend.  You can get neat little updates (news, images, video) on the various programs and follow things live like the shuttle launch today.  Lots of fun and a nice time killer/waster.   :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 17, 2009, 08:45 AM
Nice, technology is a wonderful thing.  ;D

NASA Hails Fifth Shuttle Launch of 2009 (http://www.space.com/missionlaunches/091116-sts129-space-shuttle-record-launch-retirement.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091117-sts126-inspect-02.jpg)

A camera on the space shuttle Atlantis' external tank beamed this view of the spacecraft's heat shield to Earth during its Nov. 16, 2009 launch. Credit: NASA TV.

As for the Leonid Meteor Shower, it was clear for awhile last night till the wind picked up & blew the clouds in. Now that it is clear, I stepped outside for 10 mins before the sun hits & caught a couple of them zipping .  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 18, 2009, 01:02 PM
Atlantis Docked to Station:

At 11:51 a.m. EST, Commander Charlie Hobaugh backed space shuttle Atlantis into pressurized mating adapter #2 on the International Space Station’s Harmony node. The two spacecraft were flying 220 miles above Earth between Australia and Tasmania at the time they docked.

The shuttle and station crews will open hatches and hold the traditional welcome ceremony at 1:48 p.m. When hatches open, astronaut Nicole Stott’s tenure as a station Expedition 21 flight engineer will come to an end as she joins the Atlantis crew.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/403499main_sts129_rpm.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis performs a "backflip" during the Rendezvous Pitch Maneuver. Photo credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091118-sts129-docking1-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Atlantis is seen via a camera mounted to the exterior of the International Space Station as it arrives on Nov. 18, 2009 during NASA's STS-129 mission to deliver much-needed spare parts. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091118-sts129-predock-02.jpg)

The current configuration of the International Space Station as of Sept. 2009 at the end of NASA's STS-128 mission to deliver supplies and new gear. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on November 18, 2009, 01:36 PM
Wow... that station is getting big!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on November 18, 2009, 09:35 PM
Yup. It's almost the size of a small moon.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: jedi_master_sal on November 19, 2009, 10:10 AM
Yup. It's almost the size of a small moon.

That's no moon, it's a space station!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 19, 2009, 11:13 AM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/403499main_eva1_start.jpg)

STS-129 spacewalkers Mike Foreman (top) and Robert Satcher exit the International Space Station's Quest airlock, beginning the first spacewalk of the mission. Photo credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/404089main_image_1522_800-600.jpg)

Backdropped by the blackness of space, a partial view of Space Shuttle Atlantis' payload bay, vertical stabilizer, orbital maneuvering system pods and docking mechanism are featured in this image photographed by the STS-129 crew from an aft flight deck window. Credit: NASA.

Meteor Explosion Lights Up Sky Over Utah
 (http://www.space.com/scienceastronomy/091118-utah-meteor-fireball.html)

Great video footage in linky below.  8)

Meteor lights up early morning sky, alarms Utahns (http://www.ksl.com/?nid=148&sid=8714738)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darth_Anton on November 24, 2009, 09:17 AM
Maybe this is old news, but I just found out about it this past weekend from a friend - the NASA App for the iPhone or iPod Touch.

I downloaded the app this past weekend.  You can get neat little updates (news, images, video) on the various programs and follow things live like the shuttle launch today.  Lots of fun and a nice time killer/waster.   :)

Free?
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 16, 2009, 01:55 AM
Universe size comparison. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2FwCMnyWZDg)

How Small We Are (http://www.funnyphotos.net.au/images/how-small-we-are1.jpg)

Quote
Who are we? We find that we live on an insignificant planet of a humdrum star lost in a galaxy tucked away in some forgotten corner of a universe in which there are far more galaxies than people. The Cosmos is all that is or ever was or ever will be. Carl Sagan.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 17, 2009, 03:29 AM
Scientists spot nearby 'super-Earth' (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/12/16/super.earth.discovery/index.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091216-super-earth-02.jpg)

This artist's conception shows the newly discovered super-Earth GJ 1214b, which orbits a red dwarf star 40 light-years from our Earth. Credit: David A. Aguilar, CfA.

New NASA space telescope launched (http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2009/12/14/tech-space-wise-telescope-launch.html)

(http://a52.g.akamaitech.net/f/52/827/1d/www.space.com/images/091209-sky-mapper-02.jpg)

An artist’s concept of the Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer (WISE), a new NASA sky-mapper to scan the cosmos in infrared better than ever before. Credit: NASA/JPL.

Name the 2 movie soundtracks in the clip below.  :P

Star size comparison (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEheh1BH34Q)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on December 17, 2009, 02:35 PM


Name the 2 movie soundtracks in the clip below.  :P

Star size comparison (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HEheh1BH34Q)

The Black Hole and Blade Runner.  :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 18, 2009, 09:34 PM
NASA reveals first-ever photo of liquid on another world (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/12/18/saturn.titan.reflection/index.html)

(http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/multimedia/images/moons/images/PIA12481-br500.jpg)

This image shows the first flash of sunlight reflected off a lake on Saturn’s moon Titan. The glint off a mirror-like surface is known as a specular reflection. Credit: NASA/JPL/University of Arizona/DLR.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 31, 2009, 05:41 AM
Blue moon to shine on New Year's Eve (http://www.cnn.com/2009/TECH/space/12/30/blue.moon/index.html)

(http://i.space.com/images/070905_fullmoon_02.jpg)

A full moon is visible in this view above Earth's horizon and airglow, photographed by Expedition 10 Commander Leroy Chiao on the International Space Station.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Ryan on December 31, 2009, 08:02 PM
I went and saw Avatar (the 3D IMAX version) last night and caught an amazing preiew for an upcoming space flick. I'm spacing the name right now but it's a documentary about the crew that fixed Hubble, all in IMAX 3D. There were some AMAZING visuals. I'll definitely be checking that one out. :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on January 5, 2010, 01:05 PM
Remember those styrofoam solar systems we all made in fifth grade for science projects?

Turns out, they may have more accurate than we thought.

http://www.popsci.com/science/article/2010-01/nasa-finds-hotter-weirder-bodies-ever-sky?page=
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 29, 2010, 01:51 PM
Mars rover likely parked for good: NASA (http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2010/01/26/tech-space-mars-rover-spirit.html)

From Space.com:

NASA Abandons Escape Attempts for Stuck Mars Rover
By Tariq Malik
SPACE.com Managing Editor
posted: 26 January 2010
01:33 pm ET
 
This story was updated at 3:47 p.m. ET.

The roving days are over for NASA's Mars rover Spirit after more than six years rolling across the Martian surface, the space agency announced Tuesday.

NASA engineers have decided to abandon efforts to rescue the Spirit rover from the deep Martian sand that snared it in May 2009. Instead, they are trying to prepare the rover to survive the harsh winter ahead in Mars' southern hemisphere. If the rover survives, it will serve as a fixed science outpost, mission managers said.

"This is not a day to mourn Spirit. This is not a day of loss," said Doug McCuistion, director of NASA's Mars exploration program, in a teleconference. "Its driving days are likely over, however its contribution will continue."

Spirit is stuck up to its wheel tops in Martian sand and slightly tilted back in a spot on Mars that scientists have named "Troy." The rover got stuck on May 6, when its wheels broke through a hard crust covering the soft sand and sunk into the sand trap.

"Spirit has encountered a golfer's worse nightmare," McCuistion said.

Engineers at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) in Pasadena, Calif., spent months working on ways to extract Spirit from its sandy predicament. Those efforts - which began in November - have been unsuccessful. Making matters worse, two of the rover's six wheels are broken, hampering its escape attempts.

Spirit and its robotic twin Opportunity have been exploring different parts of Mars since they landed in January 2004. Since then, the long-lived rovers have far outlasted their initial 90-day mission plans and discovered new insights into the history of water on Mars. Opportunity is currently working fine and is studying an odd rock called "Marquette Island" – which appears to have been ejected from deep inside Mars during an impact – as it heads toward a giant crater called Endeavour.

McCuistion called Spirit's situation "inextractable." He didn't rule out that Spirit could free itself by accident, but that's not the goal anymore.

"Right now, our plan is to worry about getting through the winter," McCuistion said.

Recent attempts to drive Spirit backwards have made some improvement to its tilt toward the sun, which is vital for the rover's solar arrays to generate the power to stay alive.

During winters on Mars, the sun is low in the sky, so engineers try to perch Spirit and Opportunity on north-facing slopes to maximize the amount of sunlight their top-mounted solar panels can collect. NASA is hopeful that Spirit can be wiggled into a favorable position before the full brunt of winter arrives in a few months.

If successful, Spirit could continue to operate through the Martian winter, or possibly enter a hibernation-like mode until the season passes and springtime returns, bringing with it more favorable levels of sunlight.

"We have hope that Spirit will survive this cold, dark winter that we have ahead of us and be ready to do more science come springtime," said the rover mission's principal investigator Steven Squyres of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York.

Squyres said Spirit can still study the Mars dirt around Troy. There is also a tantalizing chance for scientists to determine if the core of Mars is liquid or solid iron. They could do that by using Spirit's radio signals to record the motion of Mars and deduce if the red planet's core is molten or not, he added.

"Totally new science," Squyres said.

But first, Spirit must survive the next winter on Mars.

Rover project manager John Callas of JPL said that, in the end, it will all come down to power. If Spirit does not find a good sunward tilt for the coming winter, it could experience a so-called "low-power fault" and shut down all non-essential systems.

"The rover will be like a polar bear, hibernating," Callas said. "It could be for many months...on the order of six months, that the rover will be in this state."

Unlike NASA's long-silent Phoenix Mars Lander in the Martian arctic, Spirit is designed to hibernate through winters on Mars and will experience frigid temperatures of minus 49 degrees Fahrenheit (minus 45 degrees Celsius), Callas said. But Spirit is not a new rover, so its systems could be susceptible to damage due to age, he added.

"There's no guarantee that the rover will be able to survive these colder temperatures," Callas said.

It will likely be frustrating for NASA engineers as they await word from Spirit to determine if the rover survives the coming winter. After all, NASA has spent $900 million on the Mars rover mission, and typically spends $20 million a year to support Spirit and Opportunity during their extended treks on the red planet.

"That'll be challenging for the team, but it's just something we'll have to be disciplined about," Callas said

(http://i.space.com/images/spirit-rover-100121-02.gif)

This 2-frame animation aids evaluation of NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during a drive on the rover's 2,147th Martian day on Jan. 16, 2010. The rover about 3.5 centimeters (1.4 inches) southward and a half-inch (1 cm) up. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

(http://i.space.com/images/091202-spirit-wheels-02.gif)

This blink comparison aids evaluation of a drive by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's 2,099th Martian day, or sol (Nov. 28, 2009). A stall by the right-rear wheel ended the drive partway through the first of two planned wheel spins. Most of the wheel movement was slippage. Click on the image to see the animated image. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech.

Cassini Takes New Images of Saturn's Moons

(http://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/browse/PIA12538.jpg)

Two of Saturn's icy moons pass each other in a mutual event recorded by the Cassini spacecraft.

The smaller moon Enceladus (504 kilometers, or 313 miles across) passes in front of the larger moon Rhea (1,528 kilometers, or 949 miles across). These three images were each taken a little more than a minute apart. Mutual event observations such as this one, in which one moon passes close to or in front of another, help scientists refine their understanding of the orbits of Saturn's moons.

The view was obtained at a distance of approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) from Enceladus and 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles) from Rhea.

The images were taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Nov. 15, 2009. Scale in the original images was 14 kilometers (9 miles) per pixel on Enceladus and 16 kilometers (10 miles) per pixel on Rhea. The images were contrast enhanced and magnified by a factor of 3 to increase the visibility of surface features.

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

(http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov/files/N00150210.jpg)

Looking for all intents and purposes like a celestial egg after a session in Saturn’s skillet, Prometheus displayed its pockmarked, irregular surface for NASA’s Cassini spacecraft on Jan. 27, 2010.

Prometheus is one of Saturn’s innermost moons. It orbits the gas-giant at a distance of 139,353 kilometers (85,590 miles) and is 86 kilometers (53 miles) across at its widest point. The porous, icy-bodied world was originally discovered by images taken by Voyager 1 back in 1980. You could say this latest “egg-cellent” view has the Cassini science team licking their chops at the thought of future Prometheus images.

This raw, unprocessed image of Prometheus [pro-MEE-thee-us] , taken in visible light, was obtained by Cassini’s narrow-angle camera at a distance of approximately 36,000 kilometers (23,000 miles).

(http://i.space.com/images/100128-dione-promethius-images2-02.jpg)

This unprocessed image of Dione was taken by Cassini on Jan. 27, 2010. The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on Jan. 27, 2010. The view was acquired at a distance of approximately 46,000 kilometers (29,000 miles) from Dione. Credit: NASA/JPL/Space Science Institute.

Oh...oh!   :-\

President Obama to Propose Abandoning NASA's Moon Plan
By Todd Halvorson and Bart Jansen
FLORIDA TODAY
posted: 28 January 2010
07:10 am ET

CAPE CANAVERAL — President Barack Obama will ask Congress to extend International Space Station operations through at least 2020 but abandon NASA's current plans to return U.S. astronauts to the moon, administration and NASA officials said Wednesday.

The president's 2011 budget request, due to be delivered to Congress on Monday, will direct NASA to invest in the development of U.S. commercial space taxi services to ferry American astronauts to and from the station.

The move is meant to reduce reliance on Russian crew transportation services after the retirement of America's aging shuttle fleet.

The administration will provide for a safe fly-out of five remaining shuttle missions – even if the final flights slip into 2011. But an option to extend shuttle operations through 2015 is being cast aside, officials said. Obama's aim is to turn NASA once again into "an engine for innovation," one that will spur the development of commercial industry in low Earth orbit.

The focus will be on developing technologies that would enable sustainable human expeditions beyond Earth orbit. But those journeys are not likely to take place before the early 2020s.

Despite a fiscal freeze on most discretionary programs, NASA's budget will be increased by $6 billion over the next five years for a total of $100 billion.

"Budgets are very tight," said former astronaut Sally Ride, who served on a presidential panel that determined NASA's current Project Constellation – the post-shuttle program – is on "an unsustainable trajectory."

"For NASA to be getting new money over the projections is to me an indication of how seriously this administration takes NASA and our goal of future innovations for this country."

The administration hopes to create 1,700 jobs in Florida and 5,000 jobs nationwide, helping to offset an anticipated loss of 7,000 jobs at Kennedy Space Center after the shuttle program's shutdown.

But some in Congress are not happy.

"My biggest fear is that this amounts to a slow death of our nation's human spaceflight program, a retreat from America's decades of leadership in space, ending the economic advantages that our space program has brought to the U.S. and ceding space to the Russians, Chinese and others," said U.S. Rep. Bill Posey, R-Rockledge.

"Until we have a clearer plan for the future, the only realistic and reasonable way to preserve America's leadership in space is to provide for a temporary extension of the shuttle," he said.

NASA since 2004 has invested $9 billion in developing the Constellation program's Ares I and Ares V rockets and the Apollo-style Orion crew capsule for missions to the moon, Mars and, in the event no commercial means becomes available, the International Space Station.

The agency also planned to develop a rocket stage to propel astronauts from low Earth to lunar orbit, and a lunar lander dubbed Altair.

The idea was to return American astronauts to the moon by 2020. But the presidential panel convened by Obama to review NASA's plans determined that a human lunar return was unlikely before 2028.

The panel favored the development of commercial crew transportation services, a move that would be a radical shift in national space policy. NASA since the late 1950s has developed rockets and spacecraft flown by U.S. astronauts.

"We really do believe it is time for American companies to come into this program in a way that they have on the cargo side for decades now," a senior NASA official said, speaking on condition of anonymity.

"This is a serious, serious effort that we believe will reduce the gap" between shuttle retirement and the first flights of successor craft, the official said.

So, what does all this mean for KSC? Here are some of the implications:

Commercial crew taxi services: One of the two companies now under NASA contract to launch cargo to the International Space Station -- SpaceX -- will be operating at Launch Complex 40 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station.
A competition presumably would be held to select a company to provide commercial crew transportation services, and it's almost certain that KSC and Cape Canaveral would be among the launch sites considered.

Senior administration officials said the commercial launch services – both cargo and crew – are expected to result in more new jobs and a higher launch rate on the Space Coast.

A higher launch rate would be good for business throughout Brevard County (which includes the Kennedy Space Center), particularly in the tourist industry.

Extending space station operations through 2020: NASA officials, U.S. Sen. Bill Nelson, D-Orlando, and others aim to secure payload processing business for extended station operations.
Scientific experiments and cargo all must be prepped for launch, and it makes sense to locate that business near the launch site.

No moon missions: The Obama administration aims to ramp up NASA's technology development programs, which have atrophied over the last several years, and make "strategic investments" at KSC, according to a senior administration space policy adviser.
The idea is to turn KSC into a "launch complex of the future," making it increasingly attractive to commercial space launch companies, the adviser said.

Technology development efforts, some of which might focus on building heavy-lift launch vehicles, would be conducted at KSC along with other endeavors that would enable eventual human expeditions beyond Earth orbit.

Obama's space plan will be a hard sell in Congress. Even ardent Obama supporters and some key space advisers are taken aback.

"If some of the reports about the president's plans for NASA's budget are correct, it would decimate the space program," a Nelson spokesman said.

NASA's planned return to the moon is behind schedule because about $12 billion budgeted for the project was not appropriated by Congress during the past six years.

But Project Constellation enjoys strong bipartisan support in both the U.S. House and the Senate, and Congress will have a big say in the plan for NASA.

The Joint Finance-Appropriations Committee passed legislation in December that requires broader congressional approval to change NASA's existing exploration program.

"I think that's the intent of the language," said U.S. Rep. Suzanne Kosmas, D-New Smyrna Beach. "It does give us hopefully some ability to weigh in."

Posey said, "This issue is far from over."

No Moon Trips: Obama's Space Vision a 'Paradigm Shift'
By Clara Moskowitz
SPACE.com Staff Writer
posted: 28 January 2010
03:07 pm ET

This story was updated at 5:41 p.m. ET.

President Obama's plan for America's space program, according to early reports, represents a fundamental shift for human spaceflight, some experts say.

The reports suggest the Obama administration intends to move toward relying on commercially-built spacecraft, rather than NASA's own vehicles, to carry humans to low-Earth orbit. The plan would also involve extending the International Space Station's lifetime and abandoning current plans to send astronauts on moon missions by 2020.

"This is definitely a paradigm shift in the way the country will go about its space program," said John Logsdon, a space policy expert and professor emeritus at George Washington University in Washington, D.C.

A spokesperson for NASA's Constellation program overseeing the moon mission work at the Johnson Space Center in Houston told SPACE.com that it would be premature to make any comments on the agency's future until after NASA's spending goals are announced next Monday in Washington, D.C.

Boost to the private sector

The new reliance on the commercial spaceflight industry to take over the duty of ferrying humans back and forth from the space station is particularly significant, experts say.

On Wednesday, a senior White House official told two Florida newspapers (Florida Today and the Orlando Sentinel) that the administration would ask for an additional $6 billion over the next five years to help private companies develop this capability. So far, no commercial company has ever independently launched humans into orbit in its own spacecraft.

"The $6 billion shows that they are very serious about making it a successful and safe program," said Brett Alexander, president of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation, a private industry group. "I think what they're putting in place is bold and exciting. Bringing commercial and private [companies] into it will reinvigorate human spaceflight."

Alexander said he's confident that industry can rise to the challenge and meet this new task, and others agree.

"I think the commercial outfits ought to be given a chance to succeed," said Leroy Chiao, former NASA astronaut and member of a blue-ribbon panel President Obama put together last year to review NASA's plans. "The technology to get into low-Earth orbit has been around for almost 50 years — it's nothing particularly new."

In fact, the Obama administration's plan is seen by some as following closely one of the possible paths put forward by the panel, which was headed by Norman Augustine, a retired Lockheed Martin chief executive.

The committee found that NASA was severely underfunded to accomplish its vision of replacing its space shuttle fleet with new Orion vehicles and Ares rockets. It also suggested that relying on commercially built spacecraft would allow NASA to focus on more ambitious human spaceflight missions, like expeditions to a nearby asteroid or the moons of Mars.

Sharp critics

Not everyone agrees with the new plan, though. Former NASA administrator Michael Griffin, now an eminent scholar at the University of Alabama, Huntsville, sharply criticized the decision, questioning whether a commercial vehicle will be ready to carry humans to the station anytime soon.

"Today we have in orbit a $75 billion International Space Station, a product of the treasure and effort of 15 nations, and the president is recommending that we hold its future utility and, indeed, its very existence hostage to fortune, hostage to the hope that presently nonexistent commercial spaceflight capability can be brought into being in a timely way, following the retirement of the Space Shuttle," Griffin said in a statement.

And others are unhappy that the Obama space plan would potentially cause the loss of many NASA jobs if the business of launching humans into space is handed over to the private sector after the space shuttles retire.

"For Florida it would be devastating in the short term," Roger Handberg, a political scientist at the University of Central Florida who has written extensively on space policy. "If NASA goes into relative decline or suspension of manned launches, we're going to be in a hole.

Florida senator Bill Nelson (D-Orlando) has also come out against the plan, and other politicians from states that would lose jobs are also likely to fight the proposal. President Obama intends to officially announce his plans for space when he submits his federal 2011 budget request Monday, which will include his request for NASA funding.

Some say to wait until then to judge the plan.

"Most of what we're reading in the media right now are rumors and I think we really would do a disservice to ourselves if we jumped to conclusions," Chiao said.

What about the moon?

One of the major questions about the new plan is what will happen to the goal of returning people to the moon. Opinion is split on whether or not Obama plans to completely scrap the Constellation program, which is NASA's current vision for space exploration. Under the program, work has already begun to design a new rocket, Ares I, and crew capsule, Orion, to carry astronauts to the moon and beyond. The first test launch of that booster went off successfully in October 2009.

"I think it would be premature to say that Constellation is going to end," Chiao told SPACE.com. "What I think would be more probable is that there would be some variation on current plans."

But others take a dimmer view.

"Constellation is dead," Logsdon said. Yet he emphasized that that doesn't mean America won't go back to the moon. It just won't go back on the schedule and vision laid out by President Bush in 2004.

"The 'vision' to return to the moon that has been guiding NASA since 2004 was always an inadequately funded fantasy," said Joan Johnson-Freese, chair of the Department of National Security Studies at the Naval War College in Newport, R. I. "One of the goals of the Obama space plan appears to be to give NASA the opportunity to build and use enduring hardware — rather than an impulsive and unrealistic return-to-the-moon on a shoestring plan."

While the shift in policy may take some adjusting to, some are hopeful that it will allow America to retain its leadership as a space-faring nation.

"Any large organization doesn't necessarily like change so it's not surprising that people are concerned and worried," Chiao said.

"But change always brings opportunity. I'm cautiously optimistic."
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 2, 2010, 08:33 AM
NASA's $100B moon program gets killed (http://www.usatoday.com/NEWS/usaedition/2010-02-02-space02_ST_U.htm?csp=34)

From Space.com

Quote
Obama Budget Scraps NASA Moon Plan for '21st Century Space Program'
By Tariq Malik
SPACE.com Managing Editor
posted: 01 February 2010
03:29 pm ET
 
President Barack Obama's 2011 budget request has effectively shut down NASA's five-year effort to return astronauts to the moon, leaving the U.S. space agency with lofty goals – but no firm deadlines – to once again send humans beyond Earth orbit.

The budget request, released today, would scrap NASA's Constellation program to build the Orion spacecraft and Ares rockets for new manned moon missions – a $9 billion investment to date. The request calls for $19 billion in funding for NASA in 2011, a slight increase from the $18.3 billion it spent in 2010.

The request does, however, pledge extra funding to extend the life of the International Space Station through at least 2020 and offers $6 billion over five years to support commercially built spaceships to launch NASA astronauts into space. The space agency's three remaining space shuttles are due to retire later this year.

The budget announcement occurred on the seventh anniversary of NASA's Columbia shuttle disaster on Feb. 1, 2003, in which seven astronauts were killed during re-entry due to wing heat shield damage. It came just days after the 24th anniversary of the Challenger shuttle accident that killed seven astronauts on Jan. 28, 1986.

NASA Administrator Charles Bolden, a former space shuttle commander, said that while the budget cancels the program building the agency's space shuttle replacement – the Orion crew vehicle – it is not trading away safety to embrace new, privately built spaceships to fly astronauts. It also paves the way for a "21st Century space program," he said.

"No one cares about safety more than I. I flew on the space shuttle four times. I lost friends in the two space shuttle tragedies. So I give you my word these vehicles will be safe," Bolden said. "They will fulfill a critical NASA need, spur industrial innovation, and free up NASA to do the bold, forward-leaning work that we need to do to explore beyond Earth."

Bolden said NASA has already made new agreements with several commercial spaceflight companies to spur their efforts. NASA and the White House Office of Science and Technology plan to make an announcement related to commercial spaceflight providers on Tuesday, NASA officials said.

"This new path is a big change. I realize that," Bolden told reporters in a teleconference. "But it is not a change from the guiding principles of NASA. It makes America stronger. It enables us to draw more strongly on the ingenuity of the commercial sector and create deeper ties with our international partners."

The new plan is not without its opponents, particularly in states that have traditionally been home to major NASA efforts.

"This is a crippling blow to America's human spaceflight program," said Congressman Pete Olson (R-Texas).  "It has taken over 50 years to build and develop America's ascension to its rightful place as the dominant player in human spaceflight. That dominance is apparently no longer desired."

Texas is home to NASA's Johnson Space Center, where astronauts train for space missions and the Mission Controls for the shuttle fleet and International Space Station are headquartered.

Scrapping Constellation

Announced in 2005, NASA's Constellation program aimed at retiring the space shuttle fleet this year and replacing it with new capsule-based vehicles (called Orion) designed to launch on Ares I rockets, with a larger heavy-lift rocket called Ares V launching lunar landers and rocket stages needed for moon-bound missions. The moon plan, announced by former President George W. Bush in 2004, was aimed at returning astronauts to the moon by 2020.

It would cost $100 billion, roughly the current price tag of the International Space Station. Cancelling the program will cost more than $2 billion in closing costs, NASA officials said.

Last year, an independent committee led by former Lockheed Martin CEO Norman Augustine reviewed NASA's moon plan and found it hobbled by severe underfunding and delays. NASA wouldn't make it back to the moon until 2028, and even then wouldn't have money to build the lander to set down on it, the committee found.

The committee submitted several options for the president, which included embracing commercially built spacecraft and pushing aside NASA's current spaceflight plan for bolder expeditions to the moon, asteroids or Mars.

"The plan released with the President's FY 2011 budget does appear to respond to the primary concerns highlighted in our committee's report," Augustine said in a statement.

Lori Garver, NASA's deputy administrator, told reporters today that the new budget request provides an overhaul of NASA's spaceflight exploration plan.

The request would set aside $369 million for vital technology development and test programs, with $183 million earmarked to support the International Space Station through 2020. The station was slated to be decommissioned in 2016, a year before the Augustine committee believed NASA's new Orion ship would be ready to ferry astronauts to it.

The new budget would set aside $3.1 billion in funding to develop better heavy-lift rockets and more advanced space propulsion technology to explore faster and farther out into the solar system, NASA officials said.

"What this program does is give us back the solar system," Garver said.

Garver and Bolden did not announce details for new vehicles, specific destinations or potential timetables for new manned missions beyond low-Earth orbit. But Garver did say that, if NASA's 2011 budget is approved, the agency could accomplish those goals well before the 2028 timeframe proposed by the Augustine committee.

The agency is hoping commercially built space ferries could be ready to fly astronauts by 2016, she added.

Beyond human spaceflight

President Obama's 2011 budget request for NASA also spotlights other areas within the space agency that have suffered in recent years due to the agency's focus on human spaceflight.

The request includes $170 million to replace NASA's lost Orbiting Carbon Observatory, a probe aimed at studying climate change, which was destroyed during a launch failure last year. About $3.2 billion is set aside for science research grants and missions, including a potential successor to the Hubble Space Telescope.

About $146 million – a $20 million increase – is allocated in the 2011 budget request to support education and public outreach. It is aimed at spurring interest in science, technology, mathematics and space among the American youth and general public, Garver said.

"There are so many wonderful things that can be done with NASA," Garver said. "It is the people's program and we're giving it back to them."

Any political comments can be made in some other area of the forum. Thanks. 

I'll just say, this ******* sucks!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on February 2, 2010, 08:37 PM
It won't stay dead.  I have a feeling it will be back in there really soon.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 3, 2010, 09:34 AM
Slam! Two Asteroids Suspected in Space Collision.

(http://i.space.com/images/asteroid-collide-100202-02.jpg)

A Hubble Space Telescope picture of a comet-like object called P/2010 A2 shows a bizarre X-pattern of filamentary structures near the point-like nucleus of the object and trailing streamers of dust. Scientists think the object is the remnant of an asteroid collision. Credit: NASA, ESA, and D. Jewitt (UCLA).

(http://i.space.com/images/100129-solar-eclipse-video-space-02.jpg)

The European Space Agency's sun-watching Proba-2 spacecraft recorded a video of the annular solar eclipse that took place on January 15, 2010. Credit: ESA.

Video: Solar Eclipse Seen From Space (http://www.space.com/common/media/video/player.php?videoRef=SP_100129_solar-eclipse-from-space)

NASA sets launch of Endeavour for next Sunday morning  (http://www.examiner.com/x-958-Cape-Canaveral-Space-Program-Examiner~y2010m1d31-NASA-sets-launch-of-Endeavour-for-next-Sunday-morning)

(http://i.space.com/images/100119-sts130-cargo-02.jpg)

A transport container (left) with the Tranquility module and Cupola is hoisted into position at Launch Pad 39A for installation inside the cargo bay of the waiting shuttle Endeavour on Monday, Jan. 18, 2010. Launch of the STS-130 mission is set for Feb. 7. Credit: NASA/KSC.

FY 2011 Budget Overview (387 Kb PDF) (http://www.nasa.gov/pdf/420990main_FY_201_%20Budget_Overview_1_Feb_2010.pdf)

Office of Management and Budget: FY 2011 NASA Fact Sheet (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/factsheet_department_nasa/)

NASA Budget Details From OMB (http://www.whitehouse.gov/omb/budget/fy2011/assets/nasa.pdf)

That's no moon!   :D

(http://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/1001/tethystitan_cassini.jpg)

What's that behind Titan? It's another of Saturn's moons: Tethys. The robotic Cassini spacecraft orbiting Saturn captured the heavily cratered Tethys slipping behind Saturn's atmosphere-shrouded Titan late last year. The largest crater on Tethys, Odysseus, is easily visible on the distant moon. Titan shows not only its thick and opaque orange lower atmosphere, but also an unusual upper layer of blue-tinted haze. Tethys, at about 2 million kilometers distant, was twice as far from Cassini as was Titan when the above image was taken. In 2004, Cassini released the Hyugens probe which landed on Titan and provided humanity's first views of the surface of the Solar System's only known lake-bearing moon. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darby on February 3, 2010, 10:20 AM
Beautiful.

I am really sore over the NASA situation.  I believe space exploration will continue, but our lack of national interest speaks to our lack of national ambition. 
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 6, 2010, 10:04 PM
NASA administrator concerned about potential job losses (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/02/06/nasa.jobs/index.html?hpt=T2)

Over 1000 jobs will be lost.. way to go Obama!  >:(

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/423818main_image_1584_800-600.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour is seen after the rotating service structure is rolled back on Saturday, Feb. 6, 2010 at Launch Pad 39A of the NASA Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Florida. Endeavour and the crew members of the STS-130 mission are set to launch on Sunday at 4:39 a.m. EST. Credit: NASA/Bill Ingalls.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_flag425.jpg)

Flags fly near Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida following the move of the rotating service structure from around space shuttle Endeavour. Image credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.

After traveling more than four million miles, and making 171 orbits around Earth on board space shuttle Atlantis, the Super Bowl XLIV opening-toss coin took a slight detour to the Pro Football Hall of Fame Museum in Canton, Ohio, on Jan. 27, before heading to the Super Bowl.

The coin was flown last November on STS-129 by crew members Commander Charlie Hobaugh, Pilot Barry Wilmore, and Mission Specialists Leland Melvin, Randy Bresnik, Mike Foreman and Bobby Satcher.

The astronauts stopped by the museum to return the silver-minted coin, as well as a few other space-flown memorabilia, including a football inscribed with the name of every member of the Hall of Fame. They also returned flown jerseys from the Detroit Lions and the Dallas Cowboys, the two teams Melvin played for in his short stint in the NFL.

After stopping at the Hall of Fame, the coin will journey to Sun Life Stadium in Miami Gardens, Fla., to be the one of the stars of the Super Bowl XLIV pre-game coin toss on Feb. 7.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/420397main_2010_00311_226x170.jpg)

This medallion, which was flown in space aboard space shuttle Atlantis, will be used for the official coin toss prior to the kickoff of Super Bowl XLIV. Credit: NASA/Glenn Research Center at Lewis Field.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/419871main_1574_946.jpg)

Members of the STS-129 shuttle mission present a specially minted silver medallion to National Football League officials on Wednesday, Jan. 27, 2010, at the Pro Football Hall of Fame in Canton, Ohio. The coin, which was flown in space during the November flight of Atlantis, will be used for the official coin toss prior to the kickoff of Super Bowl XLIV on Sunday, Feb. 7, 2010.

One member of Atlantis' crew, Leland Melvin, was drafted by the NFL's Detroit Lions in 1986. The crew also flew other NFL-related memorabilia, including jerseys and a football inscribed with the name of every member of the Hall of Fame.

From left: Astronauts Bobby Satcher, Randy Bresnik, and Charlie Hobaugh; Joe Horrigan, Vice President of Communications/Exhibits for the Pro Football Hall of Fame, Steve Perry, President/Executive Director of the Pro Football Hall of Fame; astronauts Berry Wilmore, Michael Foreman and Leland Melvin. Credit: NASA/Marv Smith.

New Hubble Maps of Pluto Show Surface Changes (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/pluto-20100204.html)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/421589main_p1006aw-540.jpg)

Quote
Date: Feb. 7
Mission: STS-130
Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle Endeavour
Launch Site: Kennedy Space Center - Launch Pad 39A
Launch Time: 4:39 a.m. EST
Landing: Feb. 19 - 11:14 p.m. EST
Description: Space shuttle Endeavour will deliver the final connecting node, Tranquility Node 3, and the Cupola, a robotic control station with six windows around its sides and another in the center that provides a 360-degree view around the International Space Station

Quote
Date: March 18 +
Mission: STS-131
Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle Discovery
Launch Site: Kennedy Space Center - Launch Pad 39A
Launch Time: 1:34 p.m. EDT
Description: Space shuttle Discovery will carry a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module filled with science racks that will be transferred to laboratories of the International Space Station.

Quote
Date: May 14 +
Mission: STS-132
Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle Atlantis
Launch Site: Kennedy Space Center - Launch Pad 39A
Launch Time: 2:28 p.m. EDT
Description: Space shuttle Atlantis mission will carry an integrated cargo carrier to deliver maintenance and assembly hardware, including spare parts for space station systems. In addition, the second in a series of new pressurized components for Russia, a Mini Research Module, will be permanently attached to the bottom port of the Zarya module.

Quote
Date: July 29 +
Mission: STS-134
Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle Endeavour
Launch Site: Kennedy Space Center - Launch Pad 39A
Launch Time: 7:51 a.m. EDT
STS-134 Description: Space shuttle Endeavour will deliver an EXPRESS Logistics Carrier-3 (ELC-3) and an Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS) to the International Space Station.

Quote
Date: Sept. 16 +
Mission: STS-133
Launch Vehicle: Space Shuttle Discovery
Launch Site: Kennedy Space Center - Launch Pad 39A
Launch Time: 11:57 a.m. EDT
STS-133 Description: Space shuttle Discovery will deliver the Express Logistics Carrier 4 (ELC4), a Multi-Purpose Logistics Module (MLPM) and critical spare components to the International Space Station.

God Speed Endeavour & her crew. If this launch is a go, then T-Minus 4 launches & counting left in the shuttle program.   :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 7, 2010, 08:18 AM
Weather forces NASA to scrub Endeavour launch (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/02/07/space.shuttle.endeavour/index.html?hpt=T1)

Quote
Low cloud ceilings forced NASA to scrub Sunday's launch of space shuttle Endeavour to the international space station.

"Next possible launch attempt is Monday at 4:14 a.m. ET," the agency said on its Web site.

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 8, 2010, 08:17 AM
Endeavour lifts off on two-week mission (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/02/08/nasa.shuttle.endeavor/index.html?hpt=T1)

(http://i.space.com/images/sts-130-launch-100208-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour roars off Launch Pad 39A on its STS-130 mission to deliver Tranquility and cupola to the International Space Station. Image credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/423920main_image_1585_946-710.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour lights up the night sky as it lifts off from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida. The primary payload for the STS-130 mission to the International Space Station is the Tranquility node, a pressurized module that will provide additional room for crew members and many of the station's life support and environmental control systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. The multi-directional view will allow the crew to monitor spacewalks and docking operations, as well as provide a spectacular view of Earth and other celestial objects. The module was built in Turin, Italy, by Thales Alenia Space for the European Space Agency. Credit: NASA/Jim Grossmann.

(http://i.space.com/images/tranquility-node-100204-02.jpg)

At Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, work is under way to close space shuttle Endeavour's payload bay doors around the Tranquility node. Tranquility, the primary payload for Endeavour's STS-130 mission, is a pressurized module that will provide room for many of the International Space Station's life support systems. Attached to one end of Tranquility is a cupola, a unique work area with six windows on its sides and one on top. The cupola resembles a circular bay window, and will provide a vastly improved view of the station's exterior. Credit: NASA/Kim Shiflett.

(http://i.space.com/images/station-cupola-100206-02.jpg)

An artist's concept of the new space station Cupola. Credit: NASA.

Endeavour to Deliver a Room With a View (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/shuttle/shuttlemissions/sts130/room_with_a_view.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on February 8, 2010, 09:43 AM
Sounds like Cupola is the make-out spot on the station.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 10, 2010, 07:13 AM
Endeavour docks with international space station (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/02/10/space.nasa.shuttle/index.html?hpt=T2)

(http://i.space.com/images/shuttle-dock-100209-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Endeavour is seen by a camera on the exterior of the International Space Station just before its midnight docking on Feb. 10, 2010 during NASA's STS-130 mission. Japan's giant Kibo laboratory is seen in the foreground. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://i.space.com/images/sts130-docked-100210-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Endeavour is seen docked at the International Space Station in this view taken by an exterior camera on Feb. 10, 2010. At top, the station's new Tranquility module and dome-shaped Cupola window addition can be seen in the shuttle's payload bay. Credit: NASA TV.

Solar observatory set for launch  (http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/8506140.stm)

The Solar Dynamics Observatory and its Atlas V rocket rolled out to the launch pad at Launch Complex 41 at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station in Florida. The Tuesday morning move sets the stage for a liftoff Wednesday at 10:26 a.m. EST.

Live coverage of the launch will begin at 7:15 a.m. Wednesday on NASA TV and NASA's Launch Blog (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sdo/launch/sdo_blog.html).

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/424458main_SDOrollout2_425x.jpg)

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with its Solar Dynamics Observatory payload is moved to the launch pad Tuesday in preparation for liftoff. Photo credit: United Launch Alliance/Pat Corkery.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 10, 2010, 11:05 AM
The Solar Dynamics Observatory launch is live on the NASA TV channel online.

NASA TV (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 10, 2010, 11:33 AM
NASA delays launch of rocket with solar probe (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/science/02/10/solar.dynamics.observatory/index.html?hpt=T2)

The launch is scrubbed for the day, they started the countdown at the 4 minute mark & a computer aborted at 03:59.

The clock is reset at the 5 minute mark & they are going for a 24 hr recharge for a 10:23am window for tomorrow.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 11, 2010, 08:35 AM
Shuttle and Station Crews Get to Work
Spacewalk preparations and water recovery system maintenance highlight the work schedule for the first full day of joint docked operations by the astronauts on space shuttle Endeavour and the International Space Station.

First up for Mission Specialists Nicholas Patrick and Bob Behnken will be time to configure tools they’ll take outside on the first spacewalk of the mission Thursday evening. Shuttle Commander George Zamka and station Flight Engineer Soichi Noguchi will resize a spare spacesuit for Behnken after a power harness on his original suit failed.

Station Commander Jeff Williams began his day by beginning the installation of a new Distillation Assembly and Flow Control Pump Assembly in the station’s Water Recovery System as part of the plan to reactivate the equipment that processes urine into drinking water for station crews. Flight Engineers Max Suraev and Oleg Kotov will continue to pack items in a Progress supply ship and T.J. Creamer is scheduled to be monitoring several scientific payloads. Shuttle Pilot Terry Virts and Mission Specialists Kay Hire and Steve Robinson will continue moving new equipment and supplies from Endeavour onto the station.

All 11 crew members are scheduled for some off duty time in the latter portion of their day before a spacewalk procedures review at 4:09 a.m. EST Thursday. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/425347main_image_1588_946-710.jpg)

This view of space shuttle Endeavour's aft section includes the three main engines and was taken by the Expedition 22 crew during the shuttle's approach vehicle prior to docking with the International Space Station. As part of the survey and part of every mission's activities, Endeavour performed a back-flip for the rendezvous pitch maneuver (RPM). The image was photographed with a digital still camera, using a 400mm lens at a distance of about 600 feet (180 meters). Credit: NASA.

SDO Team Continues Weather Watch as Launch Day Begins

The launch team for NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, or SDO, isn't working any issues that would prevent liftoff at 10:23 a.m. EST from Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, Fla. The only concern is the weather, which remains 60 percent "go."

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/425351main_sdo_day2_grab4_425.jpg)

A United Launch Alliance Atlas V rocket with its Solar Dynamics Observatory payload stands at Launch Complex 41 in preparation for liftoff. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 11, 2010, 10:21 AM
The Solar Dynamics Observatory is on the way, great launch.  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 13, 2010, 03:53 PM
(http://i.space.com/images/space-twitpic-100212-02.jpg)

The International Space Station's new Tranquility module is moved to the port side of the Unity node on the station during an overnight spacewalk that began Feb. 10, 2010 on NASA's STS-130 mission. Credit: NASA.

(http://i.space.com/images/spacewalkers-sts130-100211-02.jpg)

The International Space Station's new Tranquility node takes center stage in this view taken during an overnight spacewalk on Feb. 10, 2010 by STS-130 astronauts Robert Behnken and Nick Patrick. Here, the module is already installed on the ISS. The Cupola dome can be seen in the foreground. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://i.space.com/images/tranquility-open-100213-02.jpg)

Astronauts open the new Tranquility room at the International Space Station on Feb. 12, 2010 during the STS-130 mission aboard shuttle Endeavour. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://i.space.com/images/tranquility-room-100211-02.jpg)

This four-frame mosaic shows the delivery of NASA's new Tranquility module to the International Space Station during a Feb. 10, 2010 spacewalk by the STS-130 crew. Credit: NASA/collectSPACE.com

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/425427main_image_1589_800-600.jpg)

NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory, SDO, launched aboard a United Launch Alliance Atlas V from Space Launch Complex-41 at 10:23 a.m. EST on Thursday, Feb. 11, 2010. SDO is the first satellite of NASA's Living with a Star (LWS) program.
From its geosynchronous orbit, SDO will point its instruments at the sun, conducting groundbreaking research that is expected to reveal the sun's inner workings by constantly taking high resolution images, collecting readings from inside the sun and measuring its magnetic field activity. This data is expected to give researchers the insight they need to eventually predict solar storms and other activity on the sun that can affect spacecraft in orbit, astronauts on the International Space Station and electronic and other systems on Earth. Credit: Pat Corkery/United Launch Alliance.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/426214main_1592_800-600.jpg)

In a very unique setting over Earth's colorful horizon, the silhouette of the space shuttle Endeavour is featured in this photo by an Expedition 22 crew member on board the International Space Station, as the shuttle approached for its docking on Feb. 9 during the STS-130 mission. Image Credit: NASA
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 14, 2010, 08:11 PM
NASA extends shuttle mission by a day (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/02/14/shuttle.mission/index.html)

(http://i.space.com/images/sts130spacewalk2B-100214-02.jpg)

Endeavour shuttle astronauts Nicholas Patrick and Robert Behnken work outside the International Space Station during the second spacewalk of the STS-130 mission on Feb. 13 and 14, 2010. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/403499main_shuttlepic_425x291.jpg)

NASA astronauts Terry Virts (right), STS-130 pilot; Nicholas Patrick (left) and Stephen Robinson, both mission specialists, are pictured in the newly-installed Tranquility node of the International Space Station. Image credit: NASA.

Voyager Makes an Interstellar Discovery (http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/index.html)

This Valentine's Day is also the 20th anniversary of an iconic space photo taken by NASA's Voyager 1 probe during it tour of the solar system in the late 1970s and 1980s.

On Feb. 14, 1980, the deep space probe took an image of Earth from a distance of nearly 4 billion miles (6 billion km) as it headed outside our solar system.

The image showed Earth, home to billions of human beings, as little more than a point of light in a sea of other lights.

Voyager 1 also took snapshots of Neptune, Uranus, Saturn, Jupiter, a crescent of Mars, and Venus. Mercury was too close to the sun and Pluto was too dim.

But it was the probe's view of Earth that inspired the late famed astronomer Carl Sagan, then a Voyager 1 imaging team member, to call our home planet a "pale blue dot."

"It captured the Earth as a speck of light in the vastness of the solar system, which is our local neighborhood in the Milky Way galaxy, in a universe replete with galaxies," saidid Ed Stone, Voyager project scientist at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, Calif.

Voyager 1 and its twin Voyager 2 are still sending transmissions back to Earth. They launched in 1977.

Voyager 1 is currently more than 10 billion miles (almost 17 billion km) from the sun. It and Voyager 2 are headed for the boundary of a bubble created by sun that surrounds all of the planets in our solar system.

"We were marveling at the vastness of space when this portrait was taken, but 20 years later, we're still inside the bubble," Stone said. "Voyager 1 may leave the solar bubble in five more years, but the family portrait gives you a sense of the scale of our neighborhood and that there is a great deal beyond it yet to be discovered."

(http://i.space.com/images/voyager1-earth-bluedot-100212-02.jpg)

These six narrow-angle color images were made from the first ever 'portrait' of the solar system taken by Voyager 1, which was more than 4 billion miles from Earth and about 32 degrees above the ecliptic. These blown-up images, left to right and top to bottom are Venus, Earth, Jupiter, and Saturn, Uranus, Neptune. Credit: NASA/JPL.

(http://voyager.jpl.nasa.gov/mission/images/bubblebig.gif)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 17, 2010, 10:47 AM
(http://i.space.com/images/sts130-viewport-100217-02.jpg)

Spacewalker Nicholas Patrick works on the International Space Station's new Cupola lookout dome to remove locking bolts and allow its seven windows to be opened for the first time during an overnight spacewalk that began on Feb. 16, 2010. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://i.space.com/images/sts130-spacewalker-100215-02.jpg)

NASA astronaut Robert Behnken, STS-130 mission specialist, participates in the mission's second session of extravehicular activity (EVA) as construction and maintenance continue on the International Space Station on Feb. 13, 2010. Credit: NASA.

(http://i.space.com/images/cupola-space-view-100217-02.jpg)

The International Space Station's new Cupola observation dome is seen with all seven of its window shutters open on Feb. 17, 2010 after a spacewalk to unlock its launch restraints during NASA's STS-130 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/427087main_cupola_946-710.jpg)

Endeavour pilot Terry Virts opened the windows of the newly installed cupola one at a time early Wednesday, giving spacewalkers Robert Behnken and Nicholas Patrick an early look into the International Space Station's room with a view that they had helped install.

The cupola's fully opened windows look down on the Sahara Desert in this image that was 'tweeted' from space by JAXA astronaut and Expedition 22 flight engineer Soichi Noguchi. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on February 17, 2010, 11:22 AM
(http://www.theforce.net/swtc/Pix/books/sw2ij/tiex1cp2.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on February 17, 2010, 11:35 AM
That is where the Emporer's throne goes.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 18, 2010, 02:45 AM
This is ******* cool!   8)

Sonic Boom Meets Sun Dog (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SsDEfu8s1Lw)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 18, 2010, 02:49 AM
Shuttle does back flip so ISS crew can inspect the heat shield (http://www.njnnetwork.com/?p=32916)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 22, 2010, 08:20 AM
The Space Shuttle Endeavour lands safely in Florida.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/428677main_1598_946-710.jpg)

With landing gear down, space shuttle Endeavour approaches the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida after 14 days in space, completing the 5.7-million-mile STS-130 mission. Endeavour landed at 10:20 p.m. EST on Sunday, Feb. 21, after delivering the new Tranquility node and its seven-window cupola to the International Space Station. Returning to Earth aboard Endeavour are Commander George Zamka; Pilot Terry Virts; and Mission Specialists Robert Behnken, Nicholas Patrick, Kathryn Hire and Stephen Robinson. Credit: NASA.

(http://i.space.com/images/space-shuttle-land-100222-02.jpg)

This photograph, taken Feb. 21, 2010 by Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi, shows the space shuttle Endeavour performing an S-turn to slow its speed during landing, as seen from 220 miles up from the station's new Cupola lookout. Credit: Soichi Noguchi via Twitter.

(http://i.space.com/images/ig385-space-windows-07-02.jpg)

The sun rises over the limb of the Earth in this photo taken from the International Space Station's new Cupola observation deck on Feb. 18, 2010. A Russian Progress spacecraft, docked to the Pirs Docking Compartment, is visible at right. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/427006main_pia12832-c516.jpg)

The immense Andromeda galaxy, also known as Messier 31 or simply M31, is captured in full in this new image from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE. The mosaic covers an area equivalent to more than 100 full moons, or five degrees across the sky. WISE used all four of its infrared detectors to capture this picture (3.4- and 4.6-micron light is colored blue; 12-micron light is green; and 22-micron light is red). Blue highlights mature stars, while yellow and red show dust heated by newborn, massive stars.

Andromeda is the closest large galaxy to our Milky Way galaxy, and is located 2.5 million light-years from our sun. It is close enough for telescopes to spy the details of its ringed arms of new stars and hazy blue backbone of older stars. Also seen in the mosaic are two satellite galaxies, known as M32, located just a bit above Andromeda to the left of center, and the fuzzy blue M110, located below the center of the great spiral arms. These satellites are the largest of several that are gravitationally bound to Andromeda.

The Andromeda galaxy is larger than our Milky Way and contains more stars, but the Milky Way is thought to perhaps have more mass due to its larger proportion of a mysterious substance called dark matter. Both galaxies belong to our so-called Local Group, a collection of more than 50 galaxies, most of which are tiny dwarf systems. In its quest to map the whole sky, WISE will capture the entire Local Group. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/427008main_pia12833-c1-516.jpg)


This image from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, highlights the Andromeda galaxy's older stellar population in blue. It was taken by the shortest-wavelength camera on WISE, which detects infrared light of 3.4 microns. A pronounced warp in the disk of the galaxy, the aftermath of a collision with another galaxy, can be clearly seen in the spiral arm to the upper left side of the galaxy. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/WISE

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/427011main_pia12834-c2-516.jpg)

This image from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE, highlights the dust that speckles the Andromeda galaxy's spiral arms. It shows light seen by the longest-wavelength infrared detectors on WISE (12-micron light has been color coded orange, and 22-micron light, red).

The hot dust, which is being heated by newborn stars, traces the spidery arms all the way to the center of the galaxy. Telltale signs of young stars can also be seen in the centers of Andromeda's smaller companion galaxies, M32 and M110.

Andromeda, also called M31, is 2.5 million light-years away, and is the nearest large neighbor to our Milky Way galaxy. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/426996main_pia12830-a516.jpg)

Comet Siding Spring appears to streak across the sky like a superhero in this new infrared image from NASA's Wide-field Infrared Survey Explorer, or WISE. The comet, also known as C/2007 Q3, was discovered in 2007 by observers in Australia.

The snowball-like mass of ice and dust spent billions of years orbiting in the deep freeze of the Oort Cloud, a spherical cloud of comets surrounding our solar system. At some point, it got knocked out of this orbit and onto a course that brings it closer to the sun. On October 7, 2009, it passed as close as 1.2 astronomical units from Earth and 2.25 astronomical units from the sun (an astronomical unit is the distance between the sun and Earth). Now, the comet is leaving the warmer, more hospitable neighborhood of the solar system and heading back out to chillier parts.

In this view, longer wavelengths of infrared light are red and shorter wavelengths are blue. The comet appears red because it is more than ten times colder than the surrounding stars, for example, the bright blue star in the foreground. Colder objects give off more of their light at longer wavelengths. An ice cube, for example, pours out a larger fraction of its light at longer infrared wavelengths than a cup of hot tea emits.

A comet like this one can be thought of as a time capsule leftover from the formation of our solar system 4.5 billion years ago. After spending most of its long, lonely life in the darkest, coldest parts of our solar system, it warms up as it approaches the sun. The sunlight causes it to shed ices and dust in a long tail that trails behind it.
Comet Siding Spring, having experienced this "spring" awakening, is glowing in infrared light that WISE can see. Once it moves too far from the sun's warmth and light, it will disappear from view for the foreseeable future.

Astronomers will use these measurements to learn about the comet's size, composition, reflectivity, and the size and makeup of the dust particles in its coma (the hazy cloud surrounding its nucleus) and its tail. WISE data on this and other comets will help unlock clues that lay within these icy time capsules, teaching us about our solar system's evolution.

In this image, 3.4-micron light is colored blue; 4.6-micron light is green; 12-micron light is orange; and 22-micron light is red. It was taken on Jan. 10, 2010. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UCLA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on March 3, 2010, 03:08 PM
Most detailed photo of the earth, ever:

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/03/02/article-1254834-0887ABF6000005DC-617_964x930.jpg)

http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1254834/Nasa-reveals-detailed-images-Earth.html
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on March 3, 2010, 10:59 PM
Dude...I think I can see my house!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 6, 2010, 09:06 PM
Interesting reads from Space.com

Senator Proposes Bill to Extend Space Shuttle Program (http://www.space.com/news/space-shuttle-extension-proposed-100305.html)

New Rocket Engine Could Reach Mars in 40 Days (http://www.space.com/businesstechnology/rocket-engine-mars-trip-100305.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 23, 2010, 11:24 AM
Branson spacecraft completes test flight (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/03/23/virgin.space.flight/index.html?hpt=T2)

(http://i.space.com/images/070904_spcptamerica_ctwy_02.jpg)

This cutway of New Mexico's Spaceport America terminal details the multiple levels and hangar that will house Virgin Galactic's suborbital spaceliners. Credit: URS/Foster+Partners.

(http://i.space.com/images/091207-ss2-branson-rutan-02.jpg)

Virgin Galactic founder Sir Richard Branson (left) and SpaceShipTwo designer Burt Rutan pose with the first SpaceShipTwo suborbital spaceliner (center rear) and its White Knight Two mothership in a sneak preview to their Dec. 7, 2009 unveiling. Credit: Virgin Galactic/Mark Greenberg.

(http://i.space.com/images/first-flight-ss2-100322-02.jpg)

We have liftoff! Slung underneath the WhiteKnightTwo carrier plane, SpaceShipTwo took to the air for the first time. The maiden trek on March 22, 2010 from the Mojave Air and Space Port in California lasted some three hours, the first of numbers of flight tests of the craft. Credit: Bill Deaver.

(http://i.space.com/images/ss2-1st-flight-100322-02.jpg)

The VSS Enterprise, Virgin Galactic's first SpaceShipTwo suborbital spaceliner, makes its first captive-carry flight with its WhiteKnightTwo mothership Eve on March 22, 2010 above Mojave, Calif. Credit: Virgin Galactic/Mark Greenberg.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 30, 2010, 09:51 AM
Hadron Collider breakthrough as beams collide (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/science/03/30/large.hadron.collider/index.html?hpt=T1)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on March 30, 2010, 09:19 PM
Egon always said "Don't cross the streams!"
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on March 30, 2010, 09:29 PM
Egon always said "Don't cross the streams!"

Dr. Peter Venkman: Why?
Dr. Egon Spengler: It would be bad.
Dr. Peter Venkman: I'm a little fuzzy on the whole "good/bad" thing here. What do you mean, "bad"?
Dr. Egon Spengler: Try to imagine all life as you know it stopping instantaneously and every molecule in your body exploding at the speed of light.
Dr. Ray Stantz: Total protonic reversal!
Dr. Peter Venkman: That's bad. Okay. All right, important safety tip. Thanks, Egon.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 5, 2010, 03:49 AM
Countdown on for predawn launch of shuttle Discovery (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/04/05/shuttle.discovery.launch/index.html?hpt=T2)

(http://i.space.com/images/sts131-pad-100326-02.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery stands ready at Launch Pad 39A at Kennedy Space Center in preparation for its planned April 5, 2010 launch. Credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/435738main_image_1623_800-600.jpg)

A specialized transporter brought the payload canister to Launch Pad 39A in preparation for the STS-131 mission. The canister, which is the same dimensions as the shuttle's cargo bay, held the Leonardo supply module during the move from processing to the shuttle. Leonardo will be packed inside space shuttle Discovery for launch. In this image, the payload canister holding the Leonardo supply module is hoisted to the clean room at Launch pad 39A. Credit: NASA/Amanda Diller.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Hemish on April 5, 2010, 08:43 AM
I will never ever get tired of looking at that thing.
Sadly my kids dont quite get it, maybe one day they will
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on April 5, 2010, 12:48 PM
Yeah, it's still a beautiful machine.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 5, 2010, 01:14 PM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/438968main_image_1631_946-710.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery's engines ignited at 6:21 a.m. EDT Monday, April 5, for liftoff of the STS-131 mission from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center. The seven-member crew will deliver the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo, filled with supplies, a new crew sleeping quarters and science racks that will be transferred to the International Space Station's laboratories. The crew also will switch out a gyroscope on the station’s truss, install a spare ammonia storage tank and retrieve a Japanese experiment from the station’s exterior. STS-131 is the 33rd shuttle mission to the station and the 131st shuttle mission. Credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 6, 2010, 02:04 PM
(http://i.space.com/images/aurora-space-station-100406-02.jpg)

The International Space Station flies through Earth's aurora in this photo taken by Japanese astronaut Soichi Noguchi and posted on April 5, 2010. A Russian Soyuz spacecraft is visible docked to the station. Credit: Astro_Soichi.

(http://i.space.com/images/cassini-prometheus-100406-02.jpg)

The Cassini spacecraft team has digitally remastered this new image of Saturn's moon Prometheus, showing more clearly its oblong shape, as well as numerous craters over its 100-kilometer length. Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on April 6, 2010, 02:30 PM
That's no moon....It's a potato!   :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 6, 2010, 07:42 PM
From Space.com

Quote
NASA Signs New $335 Million Deal to Fly Astronauts on Russian Spaceships
By Clara Moskowitz
SPACE.com Senior Writer
posted: 06 April 2010
06:00 pm ET

NASA has signed a new $335 million contract with Russia to buy six extra seats on Soyuz spacecraft to launch  American and partner astronauts into space after the space shuttle fleet is retired, the space agency announced Tuesday.

The new deal allows NASA to pay the Russian Federal Space Agency for six round-trip rides to and from the International Space Station in 2013 and 2014. That averages to about $55.8 million per trip – a slight increase from the $50 million NASA paid for seats on the Russian-built Soyuz spacecraft through 2012.

After NASA's three-orbiter space shuttle fleet is retired this fall, American spaceflyers will have to rely on Russia for space transportation until U.S. commercial firms can build spaceships capable of carrying humans.

President Barack Obama is hoping the commercial ventures will come through.

In his 2011 budget request, President Obama proposed that NASA cancel its current plans for a post-shuttle space vehicle and instead invest in the private sector to encourage companies such as SpaceX, Virgin Galactic and others to develop spacecraft to carry astronauts to low-Earth orbit. That would free the agency to focus on more ambitious missions to the moon, asteroids or Mars, NASA officials have said.

The space shuttle Discovery is in orbit today on one of NASA's final four shuttle missions scheduled before the fleet retires.

The new contract with Russia doesn't mean that NASA is counting out the commercial spacecraft, said NASA spokesman John Yembrick from the agency's headquarters in Washington, D.C.

"We're having redundant services," he told SPACE.com. "We always plan on purchasing a Soyuz vehicle to make sure we have access to the space station while commercial is progressing toward cargo and eventually crew capability. We're making sure that we're going to have access."

Since no commercial firm has yet launched humans into space, NASA cannot be sure when to expect alternative options to be ready.

And Russia requires a good deal of advance notice to make sure it will have Soyuz seats available, Yembrick said.

The new contract provides for the six astronauts to launch on four Soyuz vehicles in 2013 and return on two vehicles in 2013 and two in 2014. That will allow for roughly the same number of NASA crew members on the space station in 2013 as there are now.

"Right now we're keeping the crew of six with our partners and Russia to the same level it is now," Yembrick said, explaining that future space station crews will be composed of roughly the same proportions of Americans, Russians, Europeans, Canadians, and Japanese as they are now.

The contract also covers necessary astronaut training and preparation for the flights, and crew rescue if it is needed. The fee allows each astronaut to pack about 110 pounds (50 kilograms) of cargo on the trip up to space, and about 37 pounds (17 kg) for the return trip, plus trash.

NASA already has contracts in place with two American companies to provide unmanned cargo shipments to the space station in upcoming years.

The space agency has agreed to pay the California-based company Space Exploration Technologies (SpaceX) a total of $1.6 billion for 12 cargo delivery flights to the station using its Falcon 9 rockets and Dragon space capsules. The first Falcon 9 rocket is targeted to fly a test mission on May 8.

SpaceX officials have said in the past that its Dragon capsule has been designed to function as a crewed vehicle as well.

NASA has also signed a $1.9 billion deal with Orbital Sciences of Virginia for eight cargo shipments using the company's unmanned Cygnus spacecraft and its Taurus 2 rocket. The first flight of a Cygnus vehicle is targeted for 2011.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Matt_Fury on April 7, 2010, 01:29 AM
I think I just threw up in my mouth a little.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 7, 2010, 10:30 AM
Shuttle Discovery docks with space station (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/04/07/shuttle.discovery.docking/index.html?hpt=T2)

(http://i.space.com/images/shuttle-flip-sts131-100407-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery comes out of its back flip maneuver underneath the International Space Station while flying over a coastline on Earth in this April 7, 2010 photo taken during NASA's STS-131 mission. This photo is a still from video cameras on the space station's hull. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://i.space.com/images/sts131-docking-100407-02.jpg)

This NASA still taken from a sequential video camera on Discovery shows the International Space Station as it appeared on April 7, 2010 just before the two spacecraft docked during NASA's STS-131 mission. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 8, 2010, 12:53 AM
From Space.com
NASA Begins Building New Spacecraft to Visit Jupiter
By Denise Chow
Space.com Staff Writer
posted: 07 April 2010
02:18 pm ET
 
NASA has begun assembling its new Juno space probe in preparation for a mission to Jupiter to help scientists understand the origin and evolution of the largest planet in our solar system.

The assembly, testing and launch preparations phase for the Juno spacecraft began on April 1 at Lockheed Martin Space Systems in Denver, Colo. Engineers and technicians will now spend the next few months fitting instruments and navigation equipment onto the spacecraft.

The mission, led by astronomer Scott Bolton of Southwest Research Institute in San Antonio, Texas., is slated to launch in August 2011 and reach Jupiter in 2016 [photos of Jupiter].

"We're excited the puzzle pieces are coming together," Bolton said. "We're one important step closer to getting to Jupiter."

Jupiter, a gas giant, is the largest planet in the solar system. Underneath its dense cloud cover, the planet safeguards secrets to the basic processes and conditions that governed out solar system during its formation.

As our primary example of a giant planet, Jupiter can also provide critical knowledge that will help scientists understand the planetary systems that are being discovered around other stars, mission scientists said..

NASA's Juno mission is the first dedicated mission bound for Jupiter since the Galileo probe launched in 1989. Galileo's flight ended in 2003, when the aging probe was intentionally crashed into the gas giant to be destroyed in the crushing pressure of its intense atmosphere.

Unlike Galileo, which was powered by a nuclear radioisotope thermal generator, Juno will draw power from wing-like solar arrays.

The new spacecraft will carry nine science instruments on board to investigate the existence of a solid planetary core, map Jupiter's intense magnetic field, measure the amount of water and ammonia in the deep atmosphere, and observe the planet's auroras.

"We plan to be doing a lot of testing in the next few months," said Jan Chodas, Juno's project manager based at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, Calif. "We want to make sure the spacecraft is ready for the long journey to Jupiter and the harsh environment it will encounter there."

Lockheed Martin Space Systems is building the spacecraft for NASA and the Italian Space Agency in Rome is contributing an infrared spectrometer instrument and a portion of the radio science experiment.

(http://i.space.com/images/jupiter-juno-100407-02.jpg)

(http://i.space.com/images/jupiter-juno-2-100407-02.jpg)

In these pictures, workers are readying the propulsion module for NASA's Juno spacecraft bound for Jupiter. Assembly began April 1, 2010, in Denver, Colo. Launch is set for August 2011. Credit: NASA/JPL/Lockheed Martin.

(http://i.space.com/images/081009-am-juno-jupiter1-02.jpg)

An artist's illustration of NASA’s Juno spacecraft at Jupiter. Credit: NASA.

(http://i.space.com/images/shuttle-cargopod-100407-02.jpg)

This view from a camera on the hull of the International Space Station shows the shuttle Discovery and its Leonardo cargo pod during transfer work on April 7, 2010 on NASA's STS-131 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_iss023e020043.jpg)

This nadir, 800mm view of the portside top part of Discovery's cabin was provided by one of the Expedition 23 crew members aboard the International Space Station. Image credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/440859main_image_1633_800-600.jpg)

The International Space Station flew across the face of the moon over NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida approximately 15 minutes before the launch of space shuttle Discovery on the STS-131 mission. Discovery successfully launched on April 5 and is now docked with the station. STS-131 will deliver the multi-purpose logistics module Leonardo, filled with supplies, a new crew sleeping quarters and science racks that will be transferred to the International Space Station's laboratories. The crew also will switch out a gyroscope on the station’s truss, install a spare ammonia storage tank and retrieve a Japanese experiment from the station’s exterior.
Credit: Photo courtesy of Fernando Echeverria.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 9, 2010, 02:23 AM
(http://i.space.com/images/space-moving-van-100408-02.jpg)

The cargo pod Leonardo, a multi-purpose logistics module for the International Space Station, is attached to the Earth-facing berth of the outpost's Harmony node on April 8, 2010 after being moved from shuttle Discovery's payload bay during the STS-131 mission. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/441787main_image_1634_800-600.jpg)

This view of the underside of the crew cabin of the space shuttle Discovery was provided by the Expedition 23 crew during a survey as STS-131 approached the International Space Station. As part of the survey and part of every mission's activities, Discovery performed a back-flip for the rendezvous pitch maneuver (RPM). The image was photographed with a digital still camera, using a 400mm lens at a distance of about 600 feet (180 meters). Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 9, 2010, 02:27 PM
NASA unveils sweeping new programs (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/04/09/cnet.nasa.new.programs/index.html?hpt=T2)

(http://i.space.com/images/sts131-first-spacewalk-100409-02.jpg)

STS-131 Mission Specialist Rick Mastracchio exits the Quest airlock on the International Space Station on April 9, 2010 to begin the first of three spacewalks. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/442283main_image_1635_946-710.jpg)

The Expedition 23 crew photographed this view of the aft portion of space shuttle Discovery, including the three main engines, during a survey of the approaching vehicle prior to docking with the International Space Station. As part of the survey and part of every mission's activities, the STS-131 Discovery crew performed a back flip as part of the rendezvous pitch maneuver. The image was photographed with a digital still camera, using a 400mm lens at a distance of about 600 feet, or 180 meters. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 12, 2010, 10:45 AM
(http://i.space.com/images/sts131-2nd-spacewalk-tank-100411-02.jpg)

Discovery astronauts Rick Mastracchio and Clayton Anderson perform a spacewalk on April 11, 2010, the second of their STS-131 mission, to install a new ammonia coolant tank on the International Space Station. The old, empty ammonia tank they replaced is seen at the end of the station's robotic arm at left. Credit: NASA TV.

Comet Eaten By the Sun As Spacecraft Watches

The destruction of a comet as it approached the sun was caught on camera Saturday by a long-lived space observatory. The comet, a stranger to astronomers, is now doomed to anonymous obscurity.

The comet's death plunge was recorded by the sun-watching Solar and Heliospheric Observatory (SOHO) as the previously unknown icy wanderer barreled down on the sun from cosmic parts unknown, according to Spaceweather.com, a Web site dedicated to monitoring space weather.

The comet appeared in SOHO images on Friday but by early this morning it had disappeared entirely, Spaceweather.com reported.


(http://i.space.com/images/comet-sun-soho-100410-02.jpg)

This image, taken early April 10, 2010 by the NASA-ESA SOHO sun observatory, shows a newfound comet just before it is annihilated by the sun. Here, the comet is extremely bright as seen by SOHO. Shortly afterward, it dims noticeably and later disappears entirely. Credit: Spaceweather.com/NASA/ESA/SOHO.

(http://i.space.com/images/soho-comet-100312-02.jpg)

This SOHO image taken on March 12, 2010 clearly shows a sun-grazing comet closing in on the sun and headed for an encounter it will likely not survive. The sun's glare is blotted out by a disk in this view, which was taken by SOHO's LASCO 3 instrument. Credit: NASA/ESA/SOHO.

Apollo 13 Mission Manual: For the Armchair Astronaut Who Has Everything (http://news.discovery.com/space/apollo-13-mission-manual-for-the-armchair-astronaut-who-has-everything.html)

Apollo 13 badge sells for $23k (http://www.paulfrasercollectibles.com/section.asp?catid=79&docid=1061)

The Space History Sale
580 Madison Avenue, New York, 13 Apr 2010 at 13:00  (http://www.bonhams.com/cgi-bin/public.sh/pubweb/publicSite.r?sContinent=USA&screen=Catalogue&iSaleNo=17778)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 13, 2010, 05:44 AM
The world would be better if everyone watched this. (http://gizmodo.com/5513783/the-world-would-be-better-if-everyone-watched-this-video)

(http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/7/73/Pale_Blue_Dot.png)

Quote
"Look again at that dot. That’s here. That’s home. That’s us. On it everyone you love, everyone you know, everyone you ever heard of, every human being who ever was, lived out their lives. The aggregate of our joy and suffering, thousands of confident religions, ideologies, and economic doctrines, every hunter and forager, every hero and coward, every creator and destroyer of civilization, every king and peasant, every young couple in love, every mother and father, hopeful child, inventor and explorer, every teacher of morals, every corrupt politician, every “superstar,” every “supreme leader,” every saint and sinner in the history of our species lived there – on a mote of dust suspended in a sunbeam" - Carl Sagan
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on April 14, 2010, 11:12 AM
Picture of Discover's launch from Walt Disney World.

(http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/4/2010/04/500x_ssc001128small.jpg)

It left a nice Dragon cloud.

(http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/4/2010/04/500x_disney-825x1040.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 15, 2010, 03:53 AM
Pretty cool pic's.  8)

This should be interesting today  :-\

Coverage of President Obama's Visit and Space Conference (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/spaceconf.html)

Apollo astronauts decry Obama space plans (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TECH/space/04/14/us.space.program/index.html?hpt=T2)

2 days ago was the 40th anniversary of Apollo 13.

A new computer simulation reveals what would have happened if NASA and astronauts on the Apollo 13 mission had been unable to change their spacecraft's course during the ill-fated April 1970 mission. Credit AGI. (http://www.space.com/common/media/video/player.php?videoRef=SP_100412_apollo-13)

China Shifts Space Station Project Into Overdrive  (http://www.space.com/news/china-prepares-for-space-station-100415.html)

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scott on April 16, 2010, 12:12 AM
A meteor flew over MN last night...I heard the boom but missed the lights :-\
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 16, 2010, 04:12 AM
This might be the meteor Scott.

Massive Fireball Lights Up Wisconsin Sky  (http://www.space.com/news/meteorite-burst-wisconsin-100415.html)

The "Major," Green Meteor Lights Midwest Night Sky  (http://news.nationalgeographic.com/news/2010/04/100415-meteor-in-wisconsin-fireball-sky/)

NASA And Other Experts Provide Explanation Of Meteor NASA Estimates Meteor Was 3 Feet Wide (http://www.wisn.com/news/23167880/detail.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 18, 2010, 01:06 AM
Nasa embarks on a voyage into the unknown (http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/rupert-cornwell/rupert-cornwell-nasa-embarks-on-a-voyage-into-the-unknown-1947675.html)

President Speach at NASA (http://www.nasa.gov/about/obamaspeechfeature.html)

Discovery Undocks, Cleared for Monday Landing

Space shuttle Discovery undocked from the International Space Station at 8:52 a.m. EDT. Shuttle Pilot James P. Dutton, Jr. performed a fly around of the station, enabling his crewmates to conduct a photo survey of the complex.

Weather permitting, the deorbit burn is planned for 7:43 a.m. Monday, leading to a landing at 8:51 a.m. at Kennedy Space Center’s Shuttle Landing Facility.

The crew was notified that the Mission Management team has cleared space shuttle Discovery’s thermal protection systems for entry. The MMT did not work any other major issues.

(http://i.space.com/images/red-sea-nile-shuttle-100414-02.jpg)

The aft section of the docked space shuttle Discovery and the station's robotic Canadarm2 are featured in this image photographed by an STS-131 crew member on the International Space Station. The Red Sea, Sinai Peninsula (center) and Nile River (left) are seen approximately 215 miles below. Credit: NASA.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_shuttle_undocked.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery is seen from the International Space Station shortly after undocking. Image credit: NASA TV.

Volcano's Ash No Threat to Space Shuttle Landing (http://www.foxnews.com/story/0,2933,591205,00.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 19, 2010, 12:28 PM
Discovery landing nixed due to weather (http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/04/19/shuttle.landing/index.html?hpt=T2)

Discovery will have five landing opportunities available on Tuesday; two in Florida and three in California. The first Kennedy Space Center opportunity would occur at about 7:33 a.m. EDT (1133 GMT) with a second chance at about 9:08 a.m. EDT (1308 GMT). The first Edwards AFB opportunity would be at about 9:00 a.m. EDT (1300 GMT), the second at about 10:36 a.m. EDT (1436 GMT) and the final opportunity at about 12:11 p.m. EDT (1611 GMT).
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 20, 2010, 02:08 AM
Touchdown! Welcome back Discovery.  :)

T-minus 3 flights & counting...  :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 20, 2010, 02:39 AM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_131_land_425.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery lands at Kennedy Space Center in Florida, completing the STS-131 mission to the International Space Station. Credit NASA TV.

(http://i.space.com/images/sts131-descent-100420-02.jpg)

This view from a NASA camera shows the space shuttle Discovery during its Tuesday morning descent just before landing at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., on April 20, 2010 to end the STS-131 mission. Credit NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darby on April 22, 2010, 09:30 AM
Wow. (http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/04/21/solar.observatory.images/index.html?hpt=C1)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 22, 2010, 09:35 AM
Nice, cool beans Darb. Break out the smellows!  :D

More on the NASA site.

NASA's New Eye on the Sun Delivers Stunning First Images (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/sdo/news/first-light.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 23, 2010, 02:18 PM
Top-secret U.S. spacecraft launches (http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2010/04/23/tech-air-force-plance-launches.html)

(http://i.space.com/images/x-37b-launch-100422-02.jpg)

A United Launch Alliance Atlas 5 rocket with the Air Force’s Orbital Test Vehicle (OTV) launches from its Space Launch Complex-41 launch pad at 7:52 p.m. EDT on April 22, 2010. Credit: Pat Corkery/United Launch Alliance.

(http://i.space.com/images/X37b-spaceplane-100416-02.jpg)

Diagram of the U.S. Air Force's X-37B Orbital Test Vehicle. Some new details have emerged on the secretive space plane's April 2010 launch test flight. Graphic by Karl Tate.

(http://i.space.com/images/x-37b-runway-100419-02.jpg)

The X-37B space plane prototype is seen on a runway during flight tests in this undated photo released by the U.S. Air Force. Credit: USAF.

Boeing X-37 (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Boeing_X-37)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 24, 2010, 11:08 AM
Starry-Eyed Hubble Celebrates 20 Years of Awe and Discovery (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/hubble/science/hubble20th-img.html)

Change in Experiment Will Delay Shuttle’s End (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/04/24/science/space/24nasa.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Darby on April 24, 2010, 12:46 PM
This is a very sad time for a space junkie.   :(   I can only hope there are more delays.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 14, 2010, 03:37 AM
Space shuttle set for Friday liftoff (http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/05/14/space.shuttle/index.html?hpt=T2)

(http://i.space.com/images/atlantis-100511-02.jpg)

Morning breaks over Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida following the arrival of space shuttle Atlantis in preparation for its final flight, the STS-132 mission in May 2010. Credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_132_rollback3_430.jpg)

At NASA Kennedy Space Center's Launch Pad 39A, space shuttle Atlantis is revealed Thursday evening after retraction of the pad's rotating service structure. Image credit: NASA/Jack Pfaller.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 14, 2010, 02:34 PM
The last mission of the Shuttle Atlantis is on the way.  8)  :'(

How Big Is the International Space Station?... ******* big! (http://www.lifeslittlemysteries.com/how-big-is-the-international-space-station-0776/)

(http://www.lifeslittlemysteries.com/images/stories/iss-how-big-100511-02.jpg)

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 15, 2010, 06:32 PM
(http://i.space.com/images/ig400-sts132-launch-gallery-05-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis has just cleared the launch tower in this image, taken May 14, 2010. The successful launch marked the final planned liftoff of the 25-year-old shuttle and the start of the STS-132 mission to the ISS. Credit: collectSPACE.com

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/453941main_image_1665_800-600.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis soars to orbit from Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida on the STS-132 mission to the International Space Station at 2:20 p.m. EDT on May 14. The third of five shuttle missions planned for 2010, this was the last planned launch for Atlantis. Credit: NASA/Kenny Allen.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 26, 2010, 09:08 AM
Atlantis... retired!  :'(

Atlantis returns from final space mission (http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/05/26/atlantis.landing/index.html?hpt=T2)

Shuttles for sale: Less than 130 million miles, new paint (http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/05/25/space.shuttles.retirement/index.html?iref=allsearch)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_land132_425x335.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis lands at Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Credit: NASA TV.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/449262main_132_land_690.jpg)

Atlantis and the STS-132 landed at 8:48 a.m. EDT at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida, after delivering the Russian Rassvet module to the International Space Station.

T-Minus 2 launches & counting!  :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on June 22, 2010, 07:18 AM
Photo of the aurora australis from space!

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/06/21/article-1288284-0A218E7C000005DC-13_964x640.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on June 24, 2010, 05:12 PM
It looks like the Death Star just took a shot at us.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on August 4, 2010, 11:12 AM
Northern Lights over Michigan (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-1300175/SOLAR-TSUNAMI-Northern-Lights-seen-far-Michigan-Suns-flare.html)

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2010/08/04/article-1300175-0AAF4E5D000005DC-999_964x441.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on September 23, 2010, 08:15 AM
UFOs disabled nuclear weapons according to former soldiers. (http://www.reuters.com/article/idUS166901+15-Sep-2010+PRN20100915)

The truth is out there...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 1, 2010, 09:40 AM
1,200 NASA workers to be laid off (http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/10/01/nasa.layoffs/index.html?hpt=T2)

Well we new it was going to happen so all I can say is ******* kak!

After attending CV in Orlando, we took the day tour of the Kennedy Space Center. In the afternoon was a bus tour out to the launch pads & due to lightning strikes in the 5 mile safe area we were not allowed off the bus so I took pics through the windows. We were very close to the pads & it was awesome...  8)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Celebration%205/ShuttlePad39-A.jpg)

This is launch pad 39-a, this is the only operational pad left.

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Celebration%205/ShuttlePad39-B.jpg)

Launch pad 39-b... or what's left of it. It's being dismantled & it's a done deal.  :'(

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Celebration%205/OrionLaunchTower.jpg)

The Orion launch tower on the crawler-transporter, built & soon to be dismantled. ****!  :'(

1 person on this planet will walk on the moon again or Mars, that person will be Chinese... kak!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on October 14, 2010, 10:53 AM
Scienists close to creating Death Star (http://www.gearlog.com/2010/10/the_largest_laser_on_earth_may.php)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 15, 2010, 02:16 PM
Experts: Huge space tourism expansion just months away (http://www.cnn.com/2010/TRAVEL/10/15/space.tourism/index.html?hpt=C1)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 30, 2010, 07:00 PM
Space shuttle Discovery to take off Wednesday (http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/10/30/space.shuttle.discovery/index.html?hpt=T2)

(http://i.space.com/images/space-shuttle-discovery-launch-pad-101020-02.jpg)

Space shuttle Discovery is prepared for its final launch into space, which is now scheduled for Nov. 3, 2010 from the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla. Credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 4, 2010, 11:50 AM
Discovery launch delayed by a day over weather concerns (http://www.cnn.com/2010/US/11/04/space.shuttle.discovery/index.html?hpt=Sbin)

Spacecraft has closest encounter ever with comet (http://www.cnn.com/2010/WORLD/americas/11/04/comet.close.encounter/index.html?hpt=C1)

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/495293main_epoxi-1-4x3_946-710.jpg)

EPOXI Mission's Close-Up Views of Comet Hartley 2: This close-up view of comet Hartley 2 was taken by NASA's EPOXI mission during its flyby of the comet on Nov. 4, 2010. It was captured by the spacecraft's Medium-Resolution Instrument. Image credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/UMD.

Epoxi Latest Images (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/epoxi/images/version1/index.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on November 29, 2010, 10:38 AM

(http://cache.gawkerassets.com/assets/images/4/2010/11/340x_x37b_sln2010-580x379.jpg)
X-37B Shuttle's Super Secret Mission to End Soon (http://gizmodo.com/5700656/x+37b-shuttles-super-secret-mission-to-end-soon)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on December 1, 2010, 01:30 PM
I thought this (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2010/nov/HQ_M10-167_Astrobiology.html) might be of interest to this crowd.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 1, 2010, 02:00 PM
I thought  might be of interest to this crowd.
 (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2010/nov/HQ_M10-167_Astrobiology.htmlthis[/url)

Page not found... this it be...  The Invasion will begun (http://www.nasa.gov/home/hqnews/2010/nov/HQ_M10-167_Astrobiology.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Keonobi on December 1, 2010, 02:07 PM
Yes, if I could type properly....   :-[
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on December 1, 2010, 05:57 PM
"...and these are our new friends Blip and Blop."
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on December 2, 2010, 11:14 AM
NASA find new type of lifeform (on earth) (http://gizmodo.com/5704158/nasa-finds-new-life)

It's a bacteria whose basic building block is arsenic.

"This changes everything" - or so they're saying.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 2, 2010, 03:28 PM
It's life, Jim, but not as we know it, not as we know it, not as we know it;
it's life, Jim, but not as we know it, not as we know it, Captain.  :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on December 14, 2010, 01:09 PM
Voyager leaving our solar system (http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=CNG.b97f22024bc6db2a202c8cbfa569513d.101&show_article=1)

It'll be another few centuries before VGER returns with a vengeance.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 27, 2011, 10:41 AM
Hubble Finds Granddaddy of Ancient Galaxies (http://www.time.com/time/health/article/0,8599,2044517,00.html?hpt=T2)

(http://img.timeinc.net/time/daily/2011/1101/hubble_galaxy_0126.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 28, 2011, 08:53 AM
Never forget!  :(

Day of Remembrance (http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/dor11/)

NASA struggles with direction 25 years after Challenger crash (http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2011/01/28/f-challenger-crash-nasa-25-years-later.html)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/NasaMemorial.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 22, 2011, 10:35 AM
Technicians Load Discovery's PRSD for Flight. Liquid oxygen and liquid hydrogen will be loaded into Discovery's Power Reactant Storage and Distribution system today as the countdown for the STS-133 mission continues. Discovery is to lift off Thursday, Feb. 24, at 4:50 p.m. EST.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_launchdaysign2daysx425.jpg)

Signs Kennedy Space Center in Florida indicate the upcoming launch of space shuttle Discovery. Credit: NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on February 24, 2011, 02:26 PM
Live coverage of the last flight of Discovery on the NASA feed (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Weather forecasters call for a 90 percent chance of acceptable conditions at launch time.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on February 24, 2011, 09:48 PM
Go Discovery! :D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jayson on March 2, 2011, 04:47 PM
Giant chamber on the moon discovered, perfect for a future base (http://dvice.com/archives/2011/03/giant-chamber-o.php)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 4, 2011, 05:50 AM
More space shots for shuttle fans (http://cosmiclog.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2011/03/03/6182388-more-space-shots-for-shuttle-fans)

New Views of Discovery's Launch from Shuttle's Solid Rocket Boosters  (http://www.youtube.com/user/NASAtelevision#p/a/u/0/fvSRnOJ8x38)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 9, 2011, 10:26 AM
Discovery's Payload Bay Doors are Closed
Wed, 09 Mar 2011 06:22:36 AM MST

Space shuttle Discovery’s payload bay doors are closed and everything continues to proceed on schedule for this morning’s landing attempt.

Weather currently is both forecast and observed “go.” Astronaut Rick Sturckow is flying weather reconnaissance at Kennedy Space Center, where winds are forecast to be high, but within limits for runway 15. Sturckow will fly runway approaches to assess conditions for Discovery’s landing. The winds from the southeast (130 degrees) are forecast to be 15 knots, peaking to 23 knots, providing a 10 knot crosswind and 21 knot headwind.

At this time, winds are only six knots, peaking to 12 knots. End of mission weather flight rules state that daylight crosswinds may not exceed 15 knots, headwinds may not exceed 25 knots and tailwinds may not exceed 15 knots. Also, peak winds may not be greater than 10 knots over the average wind.

At 8:22 a.m., Mission Control is expected to give a “go” for Discovery’s computers to begin running the Ops 3 entry software. At 8:52 a.m. a “go” is expected for crew suit up. The “go” for deorbit burn is expected by 10:32 a.m.

The deorbit burn is scheduled for 10:52:09 a.m. and will lead to a landing at 11:57:44.

Watch Discovery's landing here (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)  <------------- NASA live feed link.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/524438main_image_1888_800-600.jpg)

The space shuttle Discovery is seen from the International Space Station as the two orbital spacecraft accomplish their relative separation on March 7. During a post undocking fly-around, the crew of each vessel photographed the opposing craft. Credit: NASA.

Also the crew got a nice wake up call the other day from none other than Cpt. James T. Kirk... William Shatner...  :D

"Capt. Kirk" Wakes Discovery Crew  (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g8okqWukoaU)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 9, 2011, 12:01 PM
Discovery & her crew are home safe & sound... Discovery: August 30, 1984-March 9, 2011.  :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on March 10, 2011, 09:29 AM
27 years and it didn't blow up. That's better than Charlie Sheen. >:D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on April 11, 2011, 11:56 AM
Secret FBI memo proves Roswell cover-up. (http://uk.ibtimes.com/articles/132521/20110410/ufo-fbi-secret-memo-flying-saucer-disc-1947-roswell-new-mexico-1947-landing-aliens-dead-bodies-crash.htm)

I want to believe.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scott on April 11, 2011, 12:21 PM
Or maybe not (http://www.ibtimes.com/articles/132868/20110411/fbi-hottel-memo-reveals-ufo-hoax.htm)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on April 11, 2011, 12:26 PM
Spoilsport. 
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: McMetal on April 11, 2011, 03:47 PM
"Chariots of the Gods...they practically own South America."
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 12, 2011, 03:45 AM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/200097main_rs_image_feature_800A_800x600.jpg)

On April 12, 1961, the era of human spaceflight began when the Cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin became the first human to orbit the Earth in his Vostock I spacecraft. The flight lasted 108 minutes.

Twenty years later, on the morning of April 12, 1981, two astronauts sat strapped into their seats on the flight deck of Columbia, a radically new spacecraft known as the space shuttle.

Astronaut John Young, a veteran of four previous spaceflights including a walk on the moon in 1972, commanded the mission. Navy test pilot Bob Crippen piloted the mission and would go on to command three future shuttle missions.

Space Shuttle astronauts John Young and Robert Crippen (in tan space suits) are greeted by members of the ground crew moments after stepping off the shuttle Columbia following its maiden flight. Credit NASA.

The Space Shuttle Era: 1981-2011.   :'(

Cities, space centers, museums want to be shuttles' final landing spot (http://www.cnn.com/2011/US/04/11/shuttles.homes/)

(http://i.space.com/images/i/9086/original/NASA-sts1-prep.jpg)

The space shuttle Columbia, NASA's first orbiter, is showered with lights in this nocturnal scene at Launch Pad 39A at the Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla., during preparations for the first flight (STS-1) of NASA's new reusable spacecraft system. This photo was taken in March 1981 ahead of Columbia's April 12, 1981 launch. Credit NASA & Space.com.

(http://i.space.com/images/i/9093/original/NASA-sts1-liftoff.jpg)

The space shuttle Columbia begins a new era of space transportation when it lifts off from NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Cape Canaveral, Fla, on April 12, 1981. The reusable orbiter, its two fuel tanks and two solid rocket boosters (SRB) has just cleared the launch tower. Credit NASA & Space.com.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/146038main_sts1_landing750.jpg)

Space Shuttle Columbia's first landing was at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center, Edwards Air Force Base, Calif. (Photo courtesy of the Edwards AFB History Office).
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BrentS on April 12, 2011, 07:55 AM
Weird seeing the big booster (sorry I don't know the techno term) painted all white again.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 12, 2011, 02:08 PM
That would be the external tank...  ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 12, 2011, 02:12 PM
NASA announces new homes for space shuttles

NASA's space shuttles are bound for New York, Los Angeles, the Washington area and Cape Canaveral, Florida, the space agency announced Tuesday.

Space shuttle Discovery will go to the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Steven F. Udvar-Hazy Center in Virginia. Discovery's last mission ended March 9. The shuttle is undergoing a decommissioning process in which all toxic materials are removed and the orbiter is prepared for display.

Currently on display at the Udvar-Hazy Center is the Enterprise, the prototype shuttle built but never flown in space. Enterprise was used to fly approach and landing tests and also for vibration tests on the ground. It will go to the Intrepid Sea, Air and Space Museum in New York.

Space shuttle Atlantis will go to the Kennedy Space Center Visitor's Complex in Florida. Atlantis' last flight is scheduled for June 28.

Space shuttle Endeavour, NASA's youngest orbiter, will go to California Science Center in Los Angeles. Endeavour's last flight, which is scheduled for April 29, will be commanded by Mark Kelly. His wife, Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, was injured in a mass shooting in January in Tucson, Arizona, but she reportedly has said she hopes to attend the launch.

Space shuttles Challenger and Columbia and their crews were lost in service in 1986 and 2003, respectively.

The announcements come on the 50th anniversary of Soviet cosmonaut Yuri Gagarin's historic flight as the first person in space, and the 30th anniversary of the first shuttle flight.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BrentS on April 12, 2011, 05:39 PM
That would be the external tank...  ;)

Yes, very technical  ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on April 12, 2011, 08:07 PM
I remember they were saving money by not painting it since they had to paint it after every mission.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 1, 2011, 03:05 AM
Welcome home Endeavour, awesome landing... an end to an era...  :'(

Endeavour's rich history of service to humanity over 19 years spanned 122,883,151 miles traveled, 4,677 orbits of the planet and 299 days aloft.

Altlantis in on the launch pad for July 8th & it's final mission...  :'(

Launch Time: 11:40 a.m. EDT .
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 1, 2011, 05:19 AM
(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/555113main_1963_1024-768.jpg)

A vapor trail follows space shuttle Endeavour as it approaches Runway 15 on the Shuttle Landing Facility at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida for the final time. Endeavour landed at 2:35 a.m. EDT on Wednesday, June 1, 2011, wrapping up the STS-134 mission. During the 16-day mission, Commander Mark Kelly and crew delivered the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer to the International Space Station. Credit: NASA/Chuck Tintera.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 8, 2011, 03:40 AM
Hopefully today is the day for an end of an era...   :'(

The countdown is continuing for launch of the final space shuttle mission at 11:26 a.m. EDT (1526 GMT). But stormy weather at the Florida spaceport means only a 30 percent chance of acceptable conditions at Atlantis' planned liftoff time.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/567168main_rollback-m_800-600.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis is revealed on Launch Pad 39A at NASA's Kennedy Space Center in Florida following the move of the rotating service structure (RSS).

The structure provides weather protection and access to the shuttle while it awaits liftoff on the pad.

RSS "rollback" marks a major milestone in Atlantis' STS-135 mission countdown. Credit: NASA/Troy Cryder.

(http://sts135.files.wordpress.com/2011/05/finalflightatlantis21.jpg)


Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 8, 2011, 09:45 AM
Live on NASA HD-TV @ Ustream (http://www.ustream.tv/nasahdtv#utm_campaign=synclickback&source=http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2011/07/watch-space-shuttle-launch/&medium=6540154)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 8, 2011, 11:50 AM
She's a thing of beauty  8)! 

(http://i2.cdn.turner.com/cnn/2011/images/07/08/t1larg.lift.off.nasatv.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Symposium on July 8, 2011, 04:22 PM
I think it's rather short sighted not having the replacement for the space shuttle program in place before the last flight. Of course it could just be me wanting more shuttle launches/flights etc. I guess this means the ESA has to step up to the plate now...... bwhahahaha  ;D *calling Beagle 2, come in Beagle 2*  :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on July 9, 2011, 11:49 PM
Well, you all wanted change. How is the change working for you? >:D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Dave on July 10, 2011, 01:53 PM
I was looking at the paper the other day with photos of the last space shuttle launch when my 3 year old asked me if we could go ride "the rocket ship".

Without getting in the politics of the space program, funding, etc - I think its a shame we wont have another significant manned space flight for at least another ten years, and likely longer.

Growing up in the '70s I loved everything space.  They still had moon landings in the early 70s and were quickly transitioning to the space shuttle.  It was an awesome thing to think about and see.  I can remember my first trip to FL included a stop at Cape Canaveral, right after Disney.  I remember being so excited to see all the stuff and remember a presentation on the ceramic tiles they were going to put on the space shuttle to dissipate the heat or re-entry.

Its sad to think my oldest son isn't going to see a significant launch until in to his teenage years at the earliest.  I'm also cynical that after a few more administrations and changes at NASA its going to be 20+ years before we do anything other than ride a Russian rocket to the *yawn* international space station.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 14, 2011, 09:30 AM
RIP Discovery...  :'(

Discovery leaves hangar to make room for Atlantis (http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts133/rollovergallery/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Symposium on July 14, 2011, 10:48 PM
I wouldn't say RIP as you'll be able to see it at the Smithsonian also I believe they'll be swapping it with Enterprise which will get to fly again when they move it to its new location ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 21, 2011, 06:05 AM
Welcome home Atlantis & her crew! End of an era. Thank You NASA & all those involved for 30 years of the Shuttle program!    :'(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 21, 2011, 07:24 AM
Since STS-1 launched on April 12, 1981, 355 individuals from 16 countries flew 852 times aboard the shuttle. The five shuttles traveled more than 542 million miles and hosted more than 2,000 experiments in the fields of Earth, astronomy, biological and materials sciences. The shuttles docked with two space stations, the Russian Mir and the International Space Station. Shuttles deployed 180 payloads, including satellites, returned 52 from space and retrieved, repaired and redeployed seven spacecraft.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/153212main_shuttle_072111_430.jpg)

Space shuttle Atlantis lands for the final time at NASA’s Kennedy Space Center in Florida. Credit: NASA TV.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 15, 2011, 10:35 PM
Planet Like 'Star Wars' Tatooine Discovered Orbiting 2 Suns (http://news.yahoo.com/planet-star-wars-tatooine-discovered-orbiting-2-suns-181404397.html)

(http://l.yimg.com/os/152/2011/09/15/kepler2_215946.jpg)

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 10, 2011, 08:27 AM
Total lunar eclipse (http://events.slooh.com/) happening now & you can see it online for those that can't see it live. This is the second total eclipse of the moon this year. The next total lunar eclipse will occur in April 2014.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on December 10, 2011, 08:31 AM
Well I was watching it live - had to come in for a few minutes...went back out and the moon was gone.  Got swallowed up by a bunch of clouds it seems.  Oh well.  First time almost seeing one "in person"
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 10, 2011, 09:24 AM
It's pretty cool, can see it out my backyard... just a tad cool out so the batts in the cam are going down.... hopefully the shots turn out... hard to get good pics when I am shivering...  :(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 10, 2011, 05:36 PM
Best I got from my backyard. 

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/Moon1.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/Moon2-1.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/Moon3.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/Moon4.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/Moon5.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Spacewalk%20China/Moon6.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on December 10, 2011, 10:57 PM
I hate it when the shadow of that Reptilian mothership blocks out the moon.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 28, 2012, 10:31 PM
26 years ago today, January 28, 1986 at 11:38 am EST.   Never Forget!

Quote
"We will never forget them nor the last time we saw them this morning as they prepared for their journey and waved goodbye and 'slipped the surly bonds of earth to touch the face of God.' "

(http://spacekate.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/Challenger-Crew-pic.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scott on January 28, 2012, 10:44 PM
That week was the sickest I ever was in my life...104+ temp for a week straight.  I was home when it blew..and I had scary sickness nightmares all week...RIP
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Symposium on January 29, 2012, 02:11 AM
That's one of those moments in time that if you were alive to see it, you never forget.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: McMetal on January 29, 2012, 03:45 PM
I seem to remember watching this in elementary school for some reason.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on March 15, 2012, 02:12 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2aCOyOvOw5c&feature=youtu.be

 :o

Buckle up.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: iFett on March 15, 2012, 03:43 PM
That was a fun ride!    ;D
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on March 15, 2012, 05:51 PM
"Benny Burtt" is credited with sound design?  Looks like Ben Burtt's son might be following in the family business.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 15, 2012, 10:47 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2aCOyOvOw5c&feature=youtu.be

 :o

Buckle up.

I have seen the vids of the SRB's coming back to slashdown but that lift off view is the fricken" cat's ass!  That DVD when it comes out is definitely on my list!   8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on March 15, 2012, 10:59 PM
How's this for space exploration? (http://news.yahoo.com/record-seeking-skydiver-makes-13-mile-test-jump-233204849.html)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 16, 2012, 02:16 AM
More like getting yer nut sack jammed in yer throat going at that speed!   ;D

I think he will break the record, has a lot of good people & tech behind him...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on March 18, 2012, 10:49 PM
More like getting yer nut sack jammed in yer throat going at that speed!   ;D

You are a poet with words.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on April 17, 2012, 11:39 PM
NASA’s Discovery shuttle wows Washington in 45-minute flyover (http://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/space-shuttle-discovery-wows-washington-in-45-minute-flyover/2012/04/17/gIQAKkgFOT_story.html)

Space Shuttle Discovery Flies Over Washington DC (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aHhBKNvEV9g&feature=related)

(http://i.space.com/images/i/16703/i02/shuttle-discovery-piggyback-flight-takeoff.jpg)

(http://www.universetoday.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/04/discovery-dc.jpg)

Second cloud to the right...and straight on till morning.   8)
(http://i.space.com/images/i/16702/original/shuttle-discovery-piggyback-flight-outline.jpg?1334668336)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 20, 2012, 08:28 PM
Solar Eclipse (http://events.slooh.com/) is happening now & you can view it safely online.   8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on May 20, 2012, 09:06 PM
I went outside to see. Now I'm blind! Thanks DSJ!  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 20, 2012, 10:36 PM
I went outside to see. Now I'm blind! Thanks DSJ!  8)

LMAO!  :P

I did take a few pics & this was the best from them... the cloud cover really helped!   8)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Solar%20Eclipse%20May%2020th%202012/023.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on May 21, 2012, 01:55 PM
Space X had their saturday launch from the Kennedy Space Center cancelled due to weather.  It's been rescheduled for tomorrow.  And IIRC, this may be the first commercial space launch to go to the International Space Station.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 21, 2012, 03:44 PM
Space X had their saturday launch from the Kennedy Space Center cancelled due to weather.  It's been rescheduled for tomorrow.  And IIRC, this may be the first commercial space launch to go to the International Space Station.

Not weather, computers aborted the countdown a half-second before launch Saturday due to high pressure in one of the Falcon 9 rocket's nine first stage engines. Engineers opted to replace a check valve in the first stage's center engine - engine No. 5 - after inspections.

SpaceX has swapped out a faulty check valve on a Merlin engine on the Falcon 9 rocket and approved plans for a second launch attempt at 3:44 a.m. EDT (0744 GMT) Tuesday.

Yes, it is the 1st commercial adventure... hopefully this all works out, they need this.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Rob on May 21, 2012, 04:45 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/KGt3h.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 22, 2012, 01:49 PM
Very nice Rob.   8)

Quote
SpaceX's Falcon 9 rocket radiantly rose into a serene predawn sky over Florida on Tuesday, successfully launching a privately-owned capsule named Dragon into orbit on a seminal test flight to the International Space Station.

The grapple is scheduled for approximately 8:06 a.m. EDT (1206 GMT) Friday. The space station crew will guide the Dragon spacecraft on the robotic arm to a port on the Harmony module.

The station residents will open hatches leading to the Dragon on Saturday, beginning work to unload nearly 1,150 pounds of bonus supplies hauled into space inside the Dragon, including food, crew provisions, student-developed experiments, and computer equipment.

The crew will install experiment hardware, broken parts, and used spacewalking gear into the Dragon's pressurized cabin for return to Earth.

The capsule is due to depart the station and fly to a parachuted splashdown in the Pacific Ocean on May 31.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on May 31, 2012, 01:30 PM
Quote
Six days after arriving at the International Space Station on a demonstration flight, SpaceX's Dragon spacecraft departed the complex today and returned to Earth. Splashdown in the Pacific Ocean occurred at 11:42 a.m. EDT (1542 GMT).

Congrats SpaceX...  :)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on May 31, 2012, 03:19 PM
I hear next week we get two celestial events. June 4th is a partial lunar eclipse. Then on June 5th "There's a little black spot on the Sun today". Venus will transit across the Sun's face.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jesse James on May 31, 2012, 11:43 PM
Thought Dale might find these interesting...

1:18 Space Figures By Dragon

(http://i1120.photobucket.com/albums/l488/AMERICAN_GRENADIER/LR-DSC03342-2.jpg)

Dragon's small scale stuff isn't poseable, but it's really sharply sculpted, and usually can be posed a little bit or parts are interchangeable.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 5, 2012, 09:17 PM
Cool beans Jesse... Dragon make great ****!  I have the Saturn V & Shuttle from them, very well made.  8)

Happening now, the live webcast of Venus transit across the Sun (http://venustransit.nasa.gov/webcasts/nasatv/)

Not going to happen again in our lifetime.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on July 23, 2012, 06:58 PM
RIP Sally! Godspeed!   :'(

Sally Ride, America's first woman in space, has died (http://www.spaceflightnow.com/news/n1207/23ride/)

(http://top-people.starmedia.com/tmp/swotti/cacheC2FSBHKGCMLKZQ==UGVVCGXLLVBLB3BSZQ==/imgSally%20Ride3.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Tracy on July 23, 2012, 08:59 PM
I was just out of High School when she first went into space.  I remember the media coverage surrounder her shuttle flight.  She was truly an inspiration to me as a young woman.  R.I.P. Sally Ride.   :(
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 5, 2012, 01:09 AM
In just over 24hrs from now, the 7 Minutes of Terror will begin! Go Curiosity go!  8)

Touchdown is expected at 1:17 a.m. EDT (GMT-4) Monday, but it will take radio signals confirming the event 13.8 minutes to cross the 154-million-mile gulf between Earth and Mars. That translates to 1:31 a.m. "Earth-received time."

(http://www.videomaker.com/community/videonews/files/2012/08/7Minutes-of-Terror_logo.jpg)

(http://i.ytimg.com/vi/65HIuz0AkcU/0.jpg)

(http://media.trb.com/media/graphic/2012-08/71581742.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: efranks on August 5, 2012, 01:05 PM
I haven't really checked all the news channels, but has anyone heard if there will be live coverage of this available somewhere?

And, does anyone think this sky crane is going to work?  I'm hoping for the best but kind of skeptical.  The airbags on the previous attempts seemed more like a more solid method and less to go wrong.

   E...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Rob on August 5, 2012, 02:15 PM
I doubt there will be live coverage... but the Science Channel is airing a special tonight. 

Here's a cool read detailing the landing site:

http://www.latimes.com/news/science/la-me-nasa-mars-rover-landing-site-20120805,0,827905.story
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 5, 2012, 03:57 PM
Ahem!  Live coverage will be broadcast!  ;)   

The space agency will begin its live coverage Sunday evening at 8:30 p.m. PT / 10:30 p.m. ET.

NASA TV Channel (http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/nasatv/index.html)

Spaceflight Mission Status Center (http://spaceflightnow.com/mars/msl/status.html)

Curiosity Cam, Ustream.TV (http://www.ustream.tv/nasajpl)

Video explanation of the 7 Minutes of Terror (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=h2I8AoB1xgUl)

The arrival of the Curiosity rover on Mars may well be the biggest, boldest extraterrestrial landing for NASA since Apollo 11 settled down on the moon on a summer's night in 1969.

This will be NASA's finest hour in space-age technology! God Speed Curiosity!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Rob on August 5, 2012, 04:24 PM
Sorry, I was confusing live coverage with some sort of delayed video feed from the actual rover when I said it was doubtful.

Yes, of course there is coverage from NASA.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on August 5, 2012, 06:33 PM
Yeah, I know what you mean Rob.  When NASA had the lunar impactor mission a few years back, a lot of people thought they'd get to see HD video of this thing flying into the surface of the moon.  But it wound up looking more like black & white time lapse images. 

Sending a video stream over those kinds of distances is really prohibitive.  Satellites that provide video service are at an altitude of 23,000 miles over the Earth's equator, and you've got to have very precise azimuth and elevation adjustments in order to receive signal, let alone transmit.  Doing that from the moon, which is over 10 times that distance was a challenge in 1969. 

Transmitting live video from Mars would be even more difficult, and the problem is twofold:  precision delivery of the signal, plus the power that would be required to do so.  The space craft probably doesn't have enough onboard power to transmit video.  And that's likely why NASA muxes together their telemetry with data from the onboard instruments and still cameras.  It's a lot more efficient from a power standpoint.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 5, 2012, 07:20 PM
Then again...

Lasers, Cameras and Particle Detectors: Mars Rover’s Super High-Tech Science Gear (http://www.wired.com/wiredscience/2012/08/instruments-mars-rover/)

Quote
From the moment the rover hits the Martian atmosphere it will start taking data. Studded in 14 locations around the probe’s heat shield are devices known as the Mars Science Laboratory Entry Descent and Landing Instrument (MEDLI). This equipment will provide information about Mars’ atmosphere and the dynamics of the rover’s descent, analyzing Curiosity’s trip to the surface and providing information helpful in designing future Mars missions.

Additionally, a special camera, the Mars Descent Imager (MARDI) will be watching the view as the ground rushes up at Curiosity. By taking high-resolution color video during the probe’s landing sequence, MARDI will provide an overview of the landscape during descent and allow geologists back on Earth to determine exactly where Curiosity lands.

Curiosity has plenty of eyes to take in the view on the ground. Perched atop its head is the MastCam, two cameras capable of taking color images and video, as well as stitching pictures together into larger panoramas. One of these two cameras has a high-resolution lens, allowing Curiosity to study the distant landscape in detail.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: efranks on August 5, 2012, 10:26 PM
When I asked about live coverage I wasn't talking about a feed from Mars but more along the lines of the control room as info is coming back. I'm assuming they'll get some info as it approaches then, as the graphic says, after the landing they're hoping for a signla back.

   E...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 5, 2012, 11:26 PM
Broadcasts will soon be live!

Jet Propulsion Laboratory Linky (http://mars.jpl.nasa.gov/msl/)

Hot Wheels toy maker Mattel, Inc., says it is preparing to release a 1:64 scale version of NASA's Curiosity rover after it lands on Mars Aug. 6.

(http://cdn.ph.upi.com/sv/i/UPI-22481343854881/2012/1/13438539966315/Mars-rover-Curiosity-to-be-Hot-Wheels-toy.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 6, 2012, 12:35 AM
0431 GMT (12:31 a.m. EDT)
One hour, just 60 minutes from Curiosity touching down on Mars! The rover currently is 9,446 miles from the planet, closing at 9,572 mph.
At the landing time, it will be mid-afternoon -- around 3 p.m. local -- in Gale Crater. It is late winter there in the southern hemisphere, about two thirds of the way from winter solstice to spring equinox.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 6, 2012, 01:25 AM
7 Minutes of Terror has begun!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 6, 2012, 01:33 AM
OMFG!   They did it! 

Congratulations to NASA & all those involed with the landing of Curiosity on Mars, truely NASA's finest hour in space-age technology since landing a man on the moon! KUDO'S!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 6, 2012, 01:48 AM
First image from the Curiosity on the surface of Mars. Credit Spaceflight.com

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Kubricks%202011/FirstimagefromtheCuriosityonthesurfaceofMars.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 6, 2012, 01:53 AM
Curiosity's shadow!   8)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Kubricks%202011/CuriositysShadow.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Rob on August 6, 2012, 03:46 PM
(http://i.imgur.com/GZUt9.png)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on August 6, 2012, 04:47 PM
Here is the real first picture the rover took.

(http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_hk_cayNIONo/SxChLESc7HI/AAAAAAAARXY/63Ul3nN_2eA/s1600/marvin-the-martian.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 6, 2012, 05:09 PM
Another great shot of Curiosity & its parachute taken from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on the descent.

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Kubricks%202011/561184_370877372981668_448884675_n.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: CloneF13Y35 on August 6, 2012, 11:29 PM
Another great shot of Curiosity & its parachute taken from the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter on the descent.

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Kubricks%202011/561184_370877372981668_448884675_n.jpg)

that is just so freaking awesome! glad the thing arrived safe and sound, now let's get to doing some scienc-y stuff!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 7, 2012, 12:40 AM
(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Kubricks%202011/Irony.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jesse James on August 7, 2012, 01:53 AM
That was our galactic F U to all the life out there.  We beat them to the punch.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 7, 2012, 01:43 PM
Scene of a Martian Landing
The four main pieces of hardware that arrived on Mars with NASA's Curiosity rover were spotted by NASA's Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter (MRO). The High-Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) camera captured this image about 24 hours after landing. The large, reduced-scale image points out the strewn hardware: the heat shield was the first piece to hit the ground, followed by the back shell attached to the parachute, then the rover itself touched down and finally, after cables were cut, the sky crane flew away to the northwest and crashed. Relatively dark areas in all four spots are from disturbances of the bright dust on Mars, revealing the darker material below the surface dust.

Around the rover, this disturbance was from the sky crane thrusters, and forms a bilaterally symmetrical pattern. The darkened radial jets from the sky crane are downrange from the point of oblique impact, much like the oblique impacts of asteroids. In fact, they make an arrow pointing to Curiosity.

This image was acquired from a special 41-degree roll of MRO, larger than the normal 30-degree limit. It rolled towards the west and towards the sun, which increases visible scattering by atmospheric dust as well as the amount of atmosphere the orbiter has to look through, thereby reducing the contrast of surface features. Future images will show the hardware in greater detail. Our view is tilted about 45 degrees from the surface (more than the 41-degree roll due to planetary curvature), like a view out of an airplane window. Tilt the images 90 degrees clockwise to see the surface better from this perspective. The views are primarily of the shadowed side of the rover and other objects. Credit: NASA/JPL-Caltech/Univ. of Arizona.

(http://www.nasa.gov/images/content/674236main_PIA16001-43_800-600.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: CloneF13Y35 on August 7, 2012, 05:20 PM
that is so awesome!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on August 10, 2012, 12:57 AM
Morpheus Lander go BOOM! (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-hvlG2JtMts)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on August 30, 2012, 05:29 PM
http://www.theonion.com/articles/william-to-debut-new-song-on-mars,29351/
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on September 7, 2012, 09:50 AM
Space Station Repaired....Ron Howard and Tom Hanks, take note. (http://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2012/09/behold-the-toothbrush-that-just-saved-the-international-space-station/262035/)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: McMetal on September 7, 2012, 10:32 AM
Where's the inanimate carbon rod when you need it?

 ;)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 21, 2012, 04:26 PM
End of a era for the Shuttle Endeavour & the Space Shuttles!  :'(

(http://spaceflightnow.com/shuttle/sts134/120921lax/full1.jpg)
Credit: Walter Scriptunas II/Spaceflight Now.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on September 21, 2012, 07:29 PM
We saw that fly by the office today. I can't wait to see it on display!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 13, 2012, 11:16 PM
Anyone been watching or has gone out to see the 12 mile procession of the shuttle Endeavour through LA? I watched the Toyota Tundra haul it over the Manchester Boulevard bridge crossing the 405 freeway, heck of a site.

Toyota Tundra Tows Shuttle Endeavour Space Shuttle Video (http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=player_embedded&v=VawVPO45HX8)

(http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/.a/6a00d8341c630a53ef017c327f9637970b-640wi)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 14, 2012, 11:44 AM
We are live for the world record breaking attempt high altitude jump. Also on this date, Chuck Yeager became the first man to break the sound barrier flying in an experimental rocket-powered airplane. Baumgartner is aiming for freefall at supersonic speeds without the aid of an aircraft and provide another milestone in aerospace exploration, to make future space travel safer.

God Speed Felix Baumgartner!

Redbullstratos Live Link (http://www.redbullstratos.com/live/)

(http://images.enstarz.com/data/images/full/6145/felix-baumgartner.jpg?w=614)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on October 14, 2012, 12:44 PM
Anyone been watching or has gone out to see the 12 mile procession of the shuttle Endeavour through LA? I watched the Toyota Tundra haul it over the Manchester Boulevard bridge crossing the 405 freeway, heck of a site.


Even the Space Shuttle has to deal with LA traffic!
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 14, 2012, 02:20 PM
Felix Baumgartner has done it, home safe & sound. 
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scott on October 14, 2012, 06:29 PM
That was awesome to watch...great TV
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 14, 2012, 08:16 PM
It's official, he broke the sound barrier record... 833.9 mph, or Mach 1.24.   8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 15, 2012, 09:55 AM
Headcam footage of Felix Baumgartner's jump 128k feet from space World Record [HQ]  (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qGlF4Wtf1WM)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on January 27, 2013, 03:46 PM
(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/PhotoShop/fallenheroespatch_zps916bc566.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on March 12, 2013, 01:35 PM
NASA Rover Finds Conditions Once Suited for Ancient Life on Mars (http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/news/news.php?release=2013-092)

Quote
An analysis of a rock sample collected by NASA's Curiosity rover shows ancient Mars could have supported living microbes. Scientists identified sulfur, nitrogen, hydrogen, oxygen, phosphorus and carbon -- some of the key chemical ingredients for life -- in the powder Curiosity drilled out of a sedimentary rock near an ancient stream bed in Gale Crater.

(http://i.space.com/images/i/000/026/080/original/mars-rover-curiosity-1st-sample-drill-hole.jpg?1360433374)

In an activity called the "mini drill test," NASA's Mars rover Curiosity used its drill to generate this ring of powdered rock for inspection in advance of the rover's first full drilling (Feb. 6, 2013). Image released Feb. 7, 2013.CREDIT: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS  & Space.com

(http://i.space.com/images/i/000/026/402/original/first-curiosity-drill-sample-scoop.jpg?1361391683)

This image from NASA's Curiosity rover shows the first sample of powdered rock extracted by the rover's drill. The image was obtained by Curiosity's Mast Camera on Feb. 20, or Sol 193, Curiosity's 193rd Martian day of operations. CREDIT: NASA/JPL-Caltech/MSSS & Space.com
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: JediJman on March 12, 2013, 04:17 PM
Took me a minute to figure out that the rover drilled the hole.  I was thinking "forget the chemcical compounds, something on Mars drilled a perfect circle in the rock!!!  No more boozing at work for me...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on June 24, 2013, 02:32 AM
Took these pic's at midnight, stupid clouds just keep rolling in.

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Storm/001_zps0ab9f1a3.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Storm/002_zps6c847983.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Storm/004_zpsc4a4928e.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: name on June 24, 2013, 09:36 AM
Needs a NSFW(erewolves) warning, next time.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scockery on June 24, 2013, 07:47 PM
I missed the Super Moon but I heard it was beaten this weekend by zombies and monsters. Super Moon still made millions, though I've heard it's not that good. Previous Super Moon was a let down for many people, so maybe expectations were too high.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on September 12, 2013, 02:32 PM
Voyager 1 probe becomes first man-made object to leave solar system (http://www.nasa.gov/mission_pages/voyager/voyager20130912.html#.UjIFc8ZwqSo)

(http://previous.presstv.ir/photo/20121204/hall20121204033156463.jpeg)

(http://i.i.cbsi.com/cnwk.1d/i/tim/2012/09/05/540485main_pia14113-43_800-600_610x458.jpg)


 :D    That's one giant leap! Unlucky frog photobombs NASA rocket launch (http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-2418836/Thats-giant-leap-Unlucky-frog-photobombs-NASA-rocket-launch.html)   ;D

(http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2013/09/12/article-2418836-1BC69319000005DC-254_634x778.jpg)

So much for that frog, he croaked!   :P
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Scockery on September 12, 2013, 06:07 PM
He shouldn't have left his pad.

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: efranks on September 13, 2013, 01:06 AM
It'll probably be our luck that it'll be some hipster ******bag alien that finds Voyager, sees the record, which is so 24th century, and dismisses the entire greetings thing we worked so hard to put together.

   E...
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Master_Phruby on September 13, 2013, 09:27 AM
or it gets blown up by Klingons.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: dave in the basement on September 19, 2013, 12:56 PM
Han Solo has been spotted on Mercury: http://ca.news.yahoo.com/han-solo-spotted-on-mercury-by-nasa-probe-114501120.html

 :o
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on October 30, 2013, 10:57 AM
Canadian astronaut Chris Hadfield kicked out of screening of "Gravity" for loudly heckling the movie (http://www.thebeaverton.com/chris-hadfield-ejected-from-movie-theatre-for-loudly-heckling-gravity.htm).
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on October 30, 2013, 11:44 AM
Apparently that site is the Canadian version of The Onion.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on October 30, 2013, 12:09 PM
Apparently that site is the Canadian version of The Onion.

Seriously?

And here I thought that the only Canadian with a sense of humor was John Candy (RIP).

Oh.  And Brent.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: BillCable on October 30, 2013, 01:10 PM
Seriously?

And here I thought that the only Canadian with a sense of humor was John Candy (RIP).

Oh.  And Brent.

Yep.  Check the other headlines:

Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on October 31, 2014, 05:53 PM
Authorities: 1 dead, 1 injured in SpaceShipTwo test flight failure (http://www.cnn.com/2014/10/31/us/spaceshiptwo-incident/index.html?hpt=hp_t1)   :-\

(http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-apps/imrs.php?src=http://img.washingtonpost.com/rf/image_908w/2010-2019/Wires/Images/2014-10-31/Reuters/2014-10-31T203925Z_01_WAS407_RTRIDSP_3_SPACE-CRASH-VIRGIN.jpg&w=1484)

Wreckage from Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo. (Still from KNBC-TV via Reuters via Washington Post)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on October 31, 2014, 10:36 PM
Damn.  And to happen this week when that Antares rocket exploded just after liftoff from that launch facility in Virginia.  At least in that accident there weren't any fatalities.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 12, 2014, 10:20 AM
Rosetta mission: Philae lander is on its way for comet touchdown (http://www.cnn.com/2014/11/12/world/comet-landing-countdown/index.html?hpt=hp_t2)

Rosetta #CometLanding webcast (http://new.livestream.com/esa/cometlanding)

ROSETTA MISSION SELFIE AT 16 KM

(http://www.esa.int/var/esa/storage/images/esa_multimedia/images/2014/10/rosetta_mission_selfie_at_16_km/14968938-1-eng-GB/Rosetta_mission_selfie_at_16_km_node_full_image_2.png)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on November 12, 2014, 11:10 AM
Touchdown! Philae the space probe is on the comet & all seems to be working, it's talking back! 310 million miles from Earth & a 10 year journey... way to go European Space Agency (ESA). Congrats!  8)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jeff on December 2, 2014, 11:55 AM
Humans are going to Mars (http://www.nasa.gov/content/nasas-journey-to-mars/#.VH3uYjHF98E).

Putting an asteroid in orbit around the moon?  Crazy.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Jesse James on December 2, 2014, 08:20 PM
(http://www.i-mockery.com/minimocks/total-recall/16.gif)

I'm in.
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: DSJ™ on December 5, 2014, 12:36 PM
A big Congrats to NASA for the 4 hour 24 minute test flight of the Delta 4 with the Orion Spacecraft's milestone journey of a new era of manned space exploration leading to Mars & beyond era!  8)

Orion Soars on First Flight Test (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UEuOpxOrA_0#t=37)  <-------- Video of the launch.

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/1415793269335_wps_3_Orion_graphic1_PNG_zps0ae59ca3.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/10177219_10152849321411772_8311086482654990920_n_zpsc5d9cb2d.jpg)
(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/10384462_727836600619408_6650029103546565271_n_zps823ce462.jpg)

Earth from Orion!   8)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/EarthfromOrion_zps1ae17707.jpg)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/10170703_758599994209402_7045339926984826067_n_zps06aa7579.png)

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/10432490_758603587542376_7338498754290652934_n_zps4d70b262.png)

I am also proud to be a part of this text flight by having my name on a dime-sized microchip & also will be on future exploration flights & missions to Mars. Damn! I have 60k in space thus far, starting to be like that Howard guy!  :D  ;D

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/OrionBoardingPass_zpsd1b30020.jpg)

Remember kids, Never judge a book by it's cover!

(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/tumblr_m8bo9u1AAC1ryu1hbo3copy_zps2886edbd.jpg) (http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/10427312_765614880159939_4copy_zpse76dc737.jpg)
(http://i75.photobucket.com/albums/i306/DSJcdn/Anaheim/mars_rover_landing_zpsd14a4fa7.jpg)
Title: Re: The Official Space Exploration Thread
Post by: Nicklab on December 5, 2014, 01:06 PM
Very beautiful flight.  I watched a good portion of it live on NASA TV. 

My one gripe?  There have been MASSIVE technological improvements in this type of spacecraft since the Apollo program.  Especially in terms of computing power.  A Commodore 64 had more computing power than Apollo 11's onboard computer.  But w